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DOCUMENT RESUME 



ED 439 719 



IR 057 813 



AUTHOR 

TITLE 

INSTITUTION 

PUB DATE 
NOTE 
PUB TYPE 
EDRS PRICE 
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IDENTIFIERS 



McCleary, Linda C., Ed. 

Read from Sea to Shining Sea. Arizona Reading Program. 
Program Manual. 

Arizona Humanities Council, Phoenix.; Arizona State Dept, of 
Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix. 

2000 - 00-00 
414p . 

Guides - Classroom - Teacher (052) 

MF01/PC17 Plus Postage. 

Cooperative Programs; Games; Learning Activities; *Library 
Planning; Library Services; * Reading Motivation; *Reading 
Programs; State Programs; Youth Programs 
* Arizona 



ABSTRACT 



This year is the first for the collaborative effort between 
the Arizona Department of Library, Archives and Public Records, and Arizona 
Humanities Council and the members of the Arizona Reads Committee. This 
Arizona Reading Program manual contains information on program planning and 
development, along with crafts, activity sheets, fingerplays, songs, games 
and puzzles, and bibliographies grouped in age specific sections for 
preschool children through young adults, including a section for those with 
special needs. The manual is divided into the following sections: 

Introductory Materials; Goals, Objectives and Evaluation; Getting Started; 
Common Program Structures; Planning Timeline; Publicity and Promotion; Awards 
and Incentives; Parents/Family Involvement; Programs for Preschoolers; 
Programs for School Age Children; Programs for Young Adults; Special Needs; 
Selected Bibliography; Resources; Resource People; and Miscellaneous 
materials. ( AEF) 



Reproductions supplied by EDRS are the best that can be made 
from the original document. 



Read from Sea to Shining Sea 

Arizona Reading Program 



Program Manual 



By 

Linda C. McCleary, Ed. 



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© 




PERMISSION TO REPRODUCE AND 
DISSEMINATE THIS MATERIAL HAS 
BEEN GRANTED BY 

Ann-Mary Johnson 



TO THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES 
INFORMATION CENTER (ERIC) 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
Office of Educational Research and Improvement 

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION 
CENTER (ERIC) 

[£ This document has been reproduced as 
received from the person or organization 
originating it. 

□ Minor changes have been made to 
improve reproduction quality. 



• Points of view or opinions stated in this 
document do not necessarily represent 
official OERI position or policy. 



2 

BEST COPY AVAILABLE 



Arizona Reading Program 

A project of Arizona Reads, a collaboration between the Arizona Humanities Council and the Arizona Department of Library, Archives and Public Records. 



PROGRAM MANUAL 



3 





State of Arizona 
DEPARTMENT OF 

LIBRARY, ARCHIVES AND PUBLIC RECORDS 

GladysAnn Wells, Director 




November, 1999 



Dear Reading Friends: 

Welcome to the beginning of our second successful 25 years of promoting 
reading in Arizona. 

While the media often seems to comment on the negative, let us not forget 
that everywhere life is full of accomplishments and often real progress. Our 
reading programs, now strengthened through our partnership with the 
Arizona Humanities Council, are among the positive stories overlooked in 
all our worry. 

I welcome you to sit back with a favorite book and occasionally look up and 
think about the joy and wonder of reading. We celebrate that joy with you! ! 

It has been said that our country’s greatest contribution to the world society 
is the ubiquitous free public library. 

Always remember ... Arizona Reads! 

Sincerely, 




jladysAnn Wells 
Director 



STATE CAPITOL 

1700 W. Washington - Room 200 • Phoenix, Arizona 85007 • HomePage: http://www.dlapr.lib.az.us 
Phone: (602) 542-4035 • FAX: (602) 542-4972 • E-Mail: gawells@dlapr.lib.az.us 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 






January 2000 



Q 



Dear Friends of the Book: 

I am extremely honored to add my letter to the other messages of welcome in this publication. 

For a quarter century, the Arizona Reading Program has celebrated the joys of reading in libraries 
across the state. The program has been, and will continue to be, one of the most successful tools 
for introducing libraries — and the treasures they contain — to children and their families. 

To begin the next twenty-five years of programming, the Arizona Department of Library, Archives 
and Public Records is partnering with the Arizona Humanities Council to further develop the 
Arizona Reading Program. We hope, for example, to expand the program’s offerings teyond the 
usual summer activities — to truly make it a year-round activity. 

One step in this development is adding the Arizona Reading Program to an overall statewide 
emphasis on literacy and reading called “Arizona Reads,” conducted jointly by AHC and DLAPR. 
In addition to the Arizona Reading Program, “Arizona Reads” offers libraries and related 
organizations two other projects: Motheread®, a national literacy effort that teaches parenting skills 
and literacy simultaneously; and the Community Book Discussion Program, which provides books 
and facilitators for local discussion activities. Combined with the Arizona Reading program, these 
two new activities will help nurture “a state that reads.” 

We at the Arizona Humanities Council are pleased to join with the Arizona Department of Library, 
Archives and Public Records to offer these worthwhile programs. We look forward to a 
continuing relationship with DLAPR, and we also look forward to working with libraries 
throughout the state to foster an appreciation of the, book in Arizona. 



Executive Director 




BEST COPY AVAILABLE 



Arizona Humanities Council 

The Ellis-Shackelford House • 1242 North Central Avenue • Phoenix, AZ 85004-1887 
602/257-0335 • Fax: 602/257-0392 • www.azhumanities.org 



READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA INTRODUCTORY MATERIALS | 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 




INTRODUCTORY MATERIALS v 

Introduction vi 

Acknowledgments vii-viii 

Arizona Reading Program History ix 



GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND EVALUATION, 1 

Goals... 1 

Objectives 1 

Setting Priorities 1 

Examples 2-3 

Evaluation 4 

Suggested Areas of Evaluation 4-5 

Quantitative and Qualitative Evaluations 5 

Evaluating Your Program: a Bibliography 6 

Reproducible Reading Program Surveys 7 

Summer Reading Program Survey 9-10 

Cuestionario del Programa de lectura de verano 1 1-12 

Preschool Story Hour Survey 13 

Cuestionario de la Hora de Cuentos para los Ninos Preescolares 14 



GETTING STARTED 15 

Facilities 15 

Staff 15 

Participants lb 

Collection lb 

Scheduling lb 

Budget lb 

Miscellaneous ^ 17 



COMMON PROGRAM STRUCTURES 19 

Structured Programs 19 

Nonstructured Programs 19-20 

Contracts or Individual Goal Setting 20 

Read-To-Me Programs 20 

Program Outline 21 

Basic Guidelines for Selecting Reading Material to Read Aloud 21 

A Word (or 2) for Parents 22 



PLANNING TIMELINE 23 

4-5 Months Prior to Beginning 23 

2-3 Months Prior to Summer 23 

1 Month Prior to Summer 24 

2-3 Weeks Prior to Summer 24 

Planning Calendars 25-34-B 



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PUBLICITY AND PROMOTION 35 

Preparing Printed Matter 35 

The Importance of an Information Form 35 -36 

Person to Person Contact 36 

Handling the Media 36-38 

Letter to Parents 39 

Kids Sportcard Show 40 

Sample News Releases 41-46 

AWARDS AND INCENTIVES 47 

Awarding Certificates 47 

Incentives 47-48 

Games 48 

An Alternative View 48 

PARENTS/FAMILY INVOLVEMENT 49 

Parental Program Tips 49-50 

Suggested Titles for use by Parents 51 

Parent / Family Program Activities 51-52 

Senior Citizens 53 

Nursing Homes and Retirement Centers 53 



PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOLERS 

BULLETIN BOARD/IDEAS/CLIPART 

Moving Across America Storytime & Clipart 54-64 

DISPLAY IDEAS 65-71 

Down By the Sea 65-69 

A School of Rainbow Fish 70-7 1 

STORYTELLING 72-78 

Three Silly Fishermen 72-73 

Sea to Shining Sea Storytime 74 

Going to the Beach Storytime 75-78 

GAMES 79-81 

Dolphin Riddle 79-80 

Dolphin Fish Pattern 81 

SONGS 82-86 

The Gentle Manatee 82 

I’m a Great Big Whale 82 

The Octopus 83 

She Waded in the Water 83-84 

Down By the Sea 85-86 

Patterns for “Down by the Sea” 87-89 

FINGERPLAYS 90-92 

A Day at the Beach 90 

The Fish Who Wished He Could Fly 91 

Flying Fish Pattern 92 

CRAFTS 93-97 

Sunny Day Beach Sculptures 93 

Pirate Hat 94 

Milk Carton Boats 95 

Make a Quilt of America 96 

Flag Magnet 96 

Floor Map 97 




9 



RECIPES 

Gelatin Ocean 

ACTIVITIES 

Regional Activities Explanation 
CRAFTS 



Quilt Designs 

Pretend Fireworks 

Patriotic Headbands 

Car Litter Bags 

Whoopee Pinwheels 

Sand Painting 

Ojo DeDios 

Flower Leis 

Windchimes 

Drums 

Rubber Band Banjo 

Kazoo 

Cultural Party 

PRESCHOOL SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 
RECOMMENDED RESOURCE 



.98 

.98 

. 99-101 
. 99-101 
102-116 
102-103 

104 

105 

106-107 

108-109 

110 

111 

112 

113 

114 

115 

115 

116 

117-128 

129 



PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN 

DISPLAY AND BULLETIN BOARD IDEAS 



Travel Through Time 
Registration Station... 
Postcard Display 



Chalk Walk.... 
State Patterns . 
ACTIVITIES 



Snake Alley Band 

Marble Contraptions 

Marbleized Masterpieces 

Marble Tournaments 

State Name Scramble 

Name That Capitol 

Beach Scramble 

United States Landmarks 

Sister City Pen Pals 

Camping Program 

Paper Chains 

Books Ahoy 



SONGS & FINGERPLAYS .. 

This Little Bird 

I Had an Old Coat 

Ocean Shell 

I Walked to the Beach 

On a Day at the Beach .... 
Pirates On the High Sea .. 
Ideas for Older Children . 

CRAFTS 

Tin Can Fiddle 

Cup Popper 

Pie Plate Cymbals 

String Instrument 

Triangle 

Harvest Com Dollies 



130-136 

130 

130 

131 
131 

132-136 

137-155 

137-142 

143 

143 

144 

145-146 

147-148 

149-150 

151-152 

153 

153 

153 

154-155 

156 - 165 
156 

157 - 162 
163 
163 

163 

164 

165 

166-168 

166 
166 
167 
167 

167 

168 




10 



Quick Trip Crafts 169 

Mosaics 169 

White Sails 169 

Felt Travel Box 170 

Paper Towel Airplane 170 

Half-Gallon Bus 170 

Fantasy Maps 170 

Mountain Landscape 170 

Rocket Windsock 170 

Expanding Horizons 171 

Candy Train 171 

Make a Ship 171 

Make a Suitcase 171 

Transportation Day 171 

Dramatic Play Travel Center 171 

The Great Transportation Race 171 

Soap Box Derby 171 

Scavenger Hunt 171 

Literary Scavenger Hunt 171 

A Whale of a Tale 172 

Rainbow Fish 172 

Bubble Program 173 

Charts 173 

Popsicle Stick Raft 174 

Three Men in a Tub 174 

Jaws 174 

Yo Ho Ho and a Bottle of Milk 175 

CLIP ART 176 

All American Reader 176 

Books to Share 177 



PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTS 

Summer Reading For Young Adults, General Goals And Objectives, Establishing Young 



Adult Programs 178 

Budget 179 

Publicity 179 

ACTIVITIES & PUZZLES 180-207 

Summer Pow Wow 1 180 

The Rush for Gold 181 

A Deep Sea Tale 182 

Discover Your Heritage 183 

Interview Questions/ Suggestions 184 

Oryx Press Family Tree Series 185 

Family Tree 186 

Historical Fiction-Immigration to America 187 

Match the Name with the Meaning 188-189 

Match the Invention with the Inventor 190-191 

State Birds Crossword Puzzle 192-193 

US Facts & Figures Crossword Puzzle 194-195 

Word Search 196-197 

Naval Vessels 198-199 

American Sign Language Puzzle 200-201 

Create Your Own Postcard 202 

Bold is Beautiful 203 

Dance Program 204 

Bird Program 205 



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IV 



11 



Music Program 206 

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 207-214 

SPECIAL NEEDS 215-244 

Special Needs Children and The Arizona Reading Program 215 

Talking Book/Braille Service Overview 216 

Some Additional Ideas 217 

Parent Guides 218 

Reproduction of Materials Distributed at Serving the Disabled Workshop 219-222 

Suggestions on Serving the Disabled 223-224 

Purpose of PALS 225-226 

Mainstreaming Special Needs Children in Public Library: Bibliography 227 

Resources in Maricopa County for the Physically Challenged 228 

Deaf Culture 229 

Special Electronic Devices 230 

Deafness 231 

Exchange Sites 232 

Assistive Listening Devices 233 

County Resources 234 

Where to order Assistive Device Catalogs 235 

Arizona Relay Service 236 

Arizona Directory of Sign Language / Oral Interpreter 237-244 

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 245-264 



RESOURCES 265-270 

Blank Forms 266-267 

Categories for Resource People 268 

Resource People Listed by Category 268-270 

RESOURCE PEOPLE 271-312 

Resource People Index 313-315 

RESOURCE COMPANIES 316-318 

RESOURCE MATERIALS 319 

Librarians Favorites: The Best Books For Planning Reading Programs 320-321 




MISCELLANEOUS 

Master Copy of Reading Log 

2000 Arizona-Reading Program Evaluation 





v 



READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



INTRODUCTION | 



Introduction 

The collaborative efforts of the Arizona Department of Library, Archives and Public Records, the Arizona 
Humanities Council and the members oflhe Arizona Reads Committee have been extraordinary for this year’s 
manual! This year is the first for the collaborative effort and it has been an overwhelming success! 

Collaboration began prior to the Arizona Reading Program (ARP) workshop in September 1999 and has 
continued. The Humanities Council is coordinating the Arizona Reads Program which includes the summer 
reading program, the Arizona Book Festival and Book Discussions. The Arizona Reads Committee members 
have submitted the articles, crafts, plays and activities for the manual and the Department has edited the 
manual. The collaborative effort is now in your hands! We hope that you enjoy! 

The Arizona Reads Committee members come from all over Arizona: from large, metropolitan libraries to 
small, rural libraries with only a few staff members. My profound thanks to each Arizona Reads Committee 
member who provided the material for this manual! You are all very special people! 

From the suggestions gathered from years’ worth of ARP evaluations, the Arizona Reads Committee members 
chose Read from Sea to Shining Sea as the theme for the 2000 reading program. The committee thought that 
the children of Arizona would he tired of the millennium theme by summer 2000, so reading, across country 
sounded enticing to them. Thus, the theme. The result of this ’’corporate thinking” is in your hands! Another 
terrific manual full of programs from preschool to young adults and a section for those with special needs! 

In this manual, you will find all programs, crafts, activity sheets and bibliographies grouped in age specific 
chapters. Each age group has its own chapter for these ideas. 

We hope you enjoy this year’s theme of Read from Sea to Shining Sea. If you have any suggestions or 
questions, please don’t hesitate to contact the Arizona Humanities Council in Phoenix at 602-257-0335, FAX: 
602-257-0392. Enjoy your summer program! 



Funded in part by the Institute of Museum & Library Services under the Library Services and Technology Act. 



READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS | 



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I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



acknowledgments! 



Dear Librarians: 

Fm sending a huge THANK YOU to all the members of the Arizona Reading Program committee! !! 



Louisa Aikin 


Maricopa County Library District 


Amber Bruno 


Tucson-Pima Public Library 


AnnaDel Paxton 


Flagstaff City-Coconino County Public Library 


Margaret Jesus 


Payson Public Library 


Deborah Kearns 


Cottonwood Public Library 


Kami Krenz 


Braille and Talking Book Library 


Carla Fite 


Civic Center Library 


Cheri Jean Brown 


Charles C. Royall Public Library 


Cathy Coffman 


Sunrise Mountain Branch Library 



Their hard work and creative ideas are the meat of this manual. Their willingness to share their ideas and time 
is what makes this program work. We are deeply indebted to each of you. 

The committee members have contributed the games, crafts, decoration ideas, activity sheets, and graphics that 
you will use in creating your summer programs. They are a wonderful group of people to work with, and I feel 
privileged to have met each of them. They are creative, enthusiastic, dedicated and always willing to share. 
They are very inspiring just to be around. 

Another mainstay of this project is Gloria Rojel of the LED Staff. Her dedication and thorough work is what 
pulls all the chapters of the manual into a good looking, cohesive unit. She works for months on the typing and 
revisions each year. We couldn’t do without her contributions, 

Gloria, and all my committee members, thank you for all your hard work. 



Linda C. McCleary 

Public Library Development Consultant 
Library Extension Division 

Arizona Department of Library, Archives and Public Records 



16 



READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



ABOUT OUR ARTIST 

The artwork used throughout the Arizona Reading Program materials was created by Ericka Cero Wood, 
proprietor of Cero Wood Graphic Design in Scottsdale. Though Ericka has worked in the graphics field for 
over 12 years, she received her Associates of Applied Science Degree at Gateway Community College in 
Advertising Art in 1994 and opened her freelance business in 1995 where she produces an array of desktop 
publishing items such as brochures, annual reports, and advertisements. 

In 1996 Erica won the T-shirt contest sponsored by Sedona Jazz on the Rocks and has recently worked with the 
Arizona Humanities Council on their graphic items. While digital art is her primary work, her real passion is 
hand illustration and painting. 

She enjoys hiking with her husband Ryan throughout Arizona and creating new art using a variety of materials. 



IREAD: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA HISTORY 1 



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READ; FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



HISTORY | 



Arizona has had successful reading programs for over twenty-five years. Many children have enjoyed the 
following themes, which have been used statewide. 



Arizona Reading Program Themes 



1974 

1975 

1976 

1977 

1978 

1979 

1980 

1981 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 

1987 

1988 

1989 

1990 

1991 

1992 

1993 

1994 

1995 

1996 

1997 

1998 

1999 

2000 



“Monster Zoo” 

“Arizona Round-Up” 

“Our Country” 

“Wizard Of Oz” 

“Star Ship To Adventure” 

“Open The Elfin Doors” 

“Ready, Set, Go!” 

“Stake Your Claim” 

“Lions & Tigers & Books” 

“Bone Up On Books Be A Bookasaurus” 
“Your Own Adventure” 

“Bite Into Books” 

“Unlock Your Universe With Books” 

“Sakes Alive— We're 75” 

‘Time Travel— You Are There” 

“Books Give Us Wings” 

“Have Books, Will Travel” 

“Read Arizona” 

“Rainbow Earth” 

“Libraries; The Greatest Show on Earth” 
“Get A Clue At The Library” 

“Pandamonium At The Library” 

“Every One A Winner” 

“Book A Trip To The Stars” 

“Readers Of The Round Table” 

“Read Arizona” 

“READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA” 





Planning Children's Programs: 

a manual 



compiled and edited by 
Linda C. McCleary 

Public Library Development Consultant 
Department of Library, Archives and Public Records 



Funded by the Library Services and Technology Act. 



21 



IREAD: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND EVALUATION | 



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I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND EVALUATION | 



Goals* 

Goals are general statements of mission or purpose. Written goals for the library guide the staff in determining 
the philosophy of the library and the role of the library in the community. Goals serve as tools for planning 
the directions of all library activities. Therefore, if the library has no written goals, they should write some. 
Since childrens services are unique and require special consideration, the general library goals should 
specifically include children’s services. 

Individual programs have written goals. Consider the library's general goals when writing program goals. 
Program goals help the programmer to coordinate a specific activity with the library's overall goals and to set 
priorities for service. Program goals may also justify staff time and budget distribution. Goals for a Reading 
Program should answer the question, "Why have a Reading Program?" 

Objectives* 

After determining the goals, develop the objectives. Objectives are specific, measurable statements that show 
how the goals will be achieved. When forming objectives, you must think ahead to the evaluation. Since the 
evaluation will try to determine if the objectives have been met, the objectives must be measurable and within 
the possibility of the library staff. For example, an objective may read, "Children participating in the Reading 
Program will maintain or improve their reading levels during the summer months." That sounds like a good 
objective and one that would be worthy to achieve. However, unless you take steps to test each child before 
and after the Reading Program, it will be impossible to determine if this objective has been met. 

The objectives that will be easiest to evaluate and compare from year to year are the ones that require counting 
and/or calculation. Objectives may include statistics such as program registration, number of children who 
completed their requirements for the program, circulation of juvenile materials, or numbers registered from 
each grade and from each school. These numbers compared to the previous year's statistics are saved to 
compare with the following year's. To determine what percentage of children from each grade in each school 
participated in the program, use these statistics. Several day's circulation figures can be compared with several 
similar days from the previous year using care to assure samples are statistically valid. To maintain or improve 
any or all of these statistics, write objectives. 



Setting Priorities 

After goals for the overall program have been determined, write objectives for each phase of the program. The 
Reading Program may be long and complex, so before the planning begins set priorities. This is especially 
important if the library has limited staff and resources. Take into account the following when setting the 
priorities for your program: advance planning, publicity, incentives and rewards, follow-up activities, and any 
other items that you feel are an integral part of your program. 

rev. 10/94 



* Used with permission from the State Library of Pennsylvania from Evaluating Summer Reading 
Programs. © 1987. 



BEST COPY AVAILABLE 

*24 



I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND EVALUATION I 



EXAMPLES 

Following are examples of three general goals for a Reading Program, objectives relating to them, and possible 
strategies to implement the objectives: 



GOAL 1. 

THE READING PROGRAM WILL ENCOURAGE CHILDREN TO READ DURING THE SUMMER. 
OBJECTIVES: 

A. Increase Reading Program registration by 5% over last year's. 

B. Include book talks and bibliographies in 10 Reading Program activities. 

C. Increase circulation of the children's collection during the Reading Program by 10% as compared with the 
circulation statistics from the previous year. 

STRATEGY 1. 

Plan several months in advance to design or use a Reading Program with a popular theme. Develop publicity 
fliers, worksheets, membership cards, and certificates that are attractive and well done. 

STRATEGY 2. 

Distribute Reading Program materials as widely as possible. Publicize the Reading Program with fliers and 
posters. Visit schools and organizations to promote the program. Use the local media to publicize the program. 

GOAL 2. 

THE READING PROGRAM WELL ENCOURAGE CHILDREN TO READ MORE WIDELY BY 
SUGGESTING A VARIETY OF BOOKS FROM DIFFERENT SUBJECTS. 

OBJECTIVES: 

A. 50% of Reading Program participants will read nonfiction as well as fiction books. 

B. Increase circulation of juvenile literature by 10%. 

STRATEGY 1. 

Require that the participants read a certain number of specific types of books. 

STRATEGY 2. 

Create and distribute specific subject area bibliographies: lists of nonfiction and fiction books that relate to this 
year's theme. 

rev. 10/94 



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GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND EVALUATION | 



STRATEGY 3. 

Use a game format such as Book Bingo or Random Choice, library maps or reading guides so that children 
must read a variety of subject areas to complete the requirements. 



GOAL 3. 

ENCOURAGE READING ALOUD AT HOME BY DEVELOPING A PRESCHOOL AGE READING 
PROGRAM COMPARABLE TO THE SCHOOL AGE READING PROGRAM. 

OBJECTIVES: 

A. 25% of the preschool population will register for the Read-To-Me program. 

B. 75% of the preschoolers attending story-time will be enrolled in the Read-To-Me program. 

STRATEGY 1. 

Plan several months in advance to design a Read-To-Me program. Develop colorful, attractive and well 
produced fliers, membership cards, and certificates. 

STRATEGY 2. 

Advertise the Read-To-Me program to the parents of story time participants and preschoolers. Use the media to 
promote the program. Distribute fliers in the library and in the community. 



REMEMBER: It is important to choose goals appropriate to your library — those that reflect community 
needs and the overall goals of the library. Any staff involved with children's services, as well as the library 
director, should participate in their development. If time and money are not available to work toward 
achieving all goals, pick the most important ones and work toward them. 



rev. 10/94 



£6 



I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND EVALUATION! 



Evaluation 

Evaluation is the final step of any program and the beginning step for the next one. Evaluation helps to refine or 
develop goals based on reality. The objectives you set for your program will determine the areas to be 
evaluated. 

There are many types of evaluations all of which are useful in different ways. The following list will give you 
some suggestions for areas to evaluate. 



Suggested Areas Of Evaluation 



Quantitative Measures 

1. CIRCULATION STATISTICS: Tabulate juvenile circulation statistics separately from the adult 
circulation statistics. This will enable you to determine if the Reading Program has increased total juvenile 
circulation, and it will enable you to compare circulation figures from year to year. 

2. CHANGES IN SUBJECT AREAS READ: Differences can often be seen in the type of materials 
circulating. Changes can be the result of the effectiveness of book talks, bibliographies or games used. 

3. TOTAL NUMBER OF READING PARTICIPANTS: This can measure the impact of publicity, school 
visits and program format. 

4. ACTIVE PARTICIPATION IN THE READING PROGRAM: Define active as reading a minimum 
number of books. This statistic will tell you how appealing your program was and if it kept the children 
interested. 

5. REGISTRATIONS: Use registration figures to determine the number of new users as an indication of the 
success of your publicity and the effectiveness of your programs. 

Qualitative Measures 

6. FOCUS GROUPS: Bring together a group of 8 to 12 people representing your target group. With 3 to 5 
prepared questions, open a discussion which will generate the information you desire.** 

7. PEER EVALUATION: Involve colleagues, community members, and/or other interested individuals in 
formal or informal evaluations of your program. This can be done through: 

UNOBTRUSIVE OBSERVATION, (assigning individual(s) to unobtrusively observe the program, 
clientele reactions etc., during the actual presentation. The emphasis here 



rev. 10/94 

is on observing the quality of the reactions, not the quantity (of attendees, numbers served, etc.). 

FORMAL QUESTIONNAIRES. PANEL DISCUSSIONS, OR FORMAL REPORT WRITING , are 
other methods of peer evaluation.** 



** Adapted from Evaluating Library Programs and Services: Tell Itl Training Manual. Edited by 
Douglas Zweizig with Michele Besant. Madison, WI; School of Library and Information Studies, 
University of Wisconsin, 1993 . 




4 



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I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND EVALUATION | 



8. FAST RESPONSE SURVEYS: Are used to gather baseline data on a new program or service, and to make 
informed, quick decisions used to adjust programs, when existing data is unavailable. Fast response 
surveys are given to a small sample group and contain few 

questions. Generally these surveys are done in questionnaire format, but focus groups are another 
alternative.** 

9. ATTITUDINAL MEASUREMENT: Used to determine feeling states of mind regarding your program, 
and especially valuable when you are collecting and comparing users and non-users. Attitudinal 
measurement assesses levels of satisfaction, predisposition towards certain actions or reactions, and assists 

sit i|{ 

in predicting future behavior. All of these can be valuable in improving your programs. 



Quantitative and Qualitative Evaluation 

When evaluating a program or service, collecting some type of statistics is considered mandatory. Statistics are 
your QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION. For instance, you may collect 

statistics showing changes in circulation during your reading program, or members of youngsters in attendance 
at the program. In the list above: “Suggested Areas of Evaluation' 1 , items 1-5 are examples of quantitative 
measures. 

Combined with quantitative evaluations, most libraries are also using QUALITATIVE EVALUATIONS. 
Examples of qualitative evaluations include fast response surveys, focus groups, peer evaluations and 
observations. (Items 6 through 9 on the “Suggested Areas of Evaluation" list.) 

Qualitative measures are a valuable complement to the statistical measures collected, especially when presented 
to people outside your library staff such as county or city leaders, funding agencies, or library trustees. 
Statistics can be dry and relatively meaningless to these individuals because they don't have the basis to 
compare these numbers over time. However, statistics combined with quotations and examples gleaned from 
surveys or focus groups, have been found to a very effective to demonstrate the value of library programs. 

We hope you begin to use some of the qualitative evaluation measures and follow up by presenting them in 
your program reports to your library director, board members, funding agencies, and to the State Library in 
your Arizona Reading Program Evaluation this year. 

rev. 10/94 



** Adapted from Evaluating Library Programs and Services: Tell ft! Training Manual. Edited by 
Douglas Zweizig with Michele Besant. Madison, WI; School of Library and Information Studies, 
University of Wisconsin, 1993. 



I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND EVALUATION | 



Evaluating Your Program: A Bibliography 

Baker, Sharon, L. and Wilfrid F. Lancaster. The Measurement and Evaluation of Library Services, 2nd ed. 
Arlington, VA: Information Resources Press, 1991. 

Bookstein, Abraham. "Questionnaire Research in a Library Setting." Journal of Academic Librarianship. 1 1 
(March 1985): 24-28. 

Evaluating Library Programs and Services: TELL IT! Training Manual , ed. Douglas Zweizig. Madison, WI, 
School of Library and Information Studies, University of Wisconsin, 1993. 

Greenbaum, Thomas L. The Practical Handbook and Guide to Focus Group Research. Lexington, MA: D.C. 
Heath, 1988. 

Henerson, Marlene E., Lynn L. Morris, and Carol J. Fitz-Gibbon. How to Measure Attitudes. Newbury, Park, 
CA: Sage, 1987. 

Hutton, Bruce, and Suzanne Walters. "Focus Groups: Linkages to the Community." Public Libraries 27 (Fall 
1988): 149-52. 

Powell, Ronald R. Basic Research Methods for Librarians, 2nd ed. Norwood, NJ: Ablex, 1991. 

Robbins, Jane and Douglas Zweizig. Are We There Yet?: Evaluating Library Collections, Reference Service, 
Programs and Personnel. Madison, WI; School of Library and Information Studies, University of Wisconsin, 
1988. 

Robbins, Jane, et al. Evaluation Strategies and Techniques for Public Library Children's Services: a 
Sourcebook. Madison, WI; School of Library and Information Studies, University of Wisconsin, 1990. 

Sandler, Mark. "Qualitative Research Methods in Library Decision-Making." In Qualitative Research in 
Information Management, eds. Jack D. Glazier and Ronald R. Powell. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited, 
1992. 

A Stakeholder Evaluation Handbook: A Focus on Evaluation. (Prepared and revised by Sharon Granger, 
Donald Leaf, and Charles Wolfe and edited by Jeff Johnson of the Library of Michigan.) Lansing, MI: Library 
of Michigan, [1993]. 

Swisher, Robert and Charles McClure. Research for Decision Making: Methods for Librarians. Chicago: 
American Library Association, 1984. 

Walter, Virginia A. Output Measures for Public Library Service to Children. Chicago, ALA, 1987. 



rev. 10/94 



REPRODUCIBLE 

READING 

PROGRAM SURVEYS 



Source: 

Output Measures for Public Library Service to Children by: 
Virginia A. Walter 
Chicago, ALA, 1992 



Summer Reading Program Survey* 



Please take a few minutes and answer these questions. Your answers will help us improve the Summer 
Reading Program next year! 



1 . 

2. 

3. 



4. 



How old are you? . 



Are you a boy or a girl? Circle the right answer. BOY GIRL 

Make a check mark in front of any of these activities that you took part in this summer. 

Summer school 

Family vacation 

Swimming lessons 

Other lessons 

Camp 

How did you hear about the Summer Reading Program? Please check the right answer. You can 
check more than one answer. 

My mother or father told me about it. 

My teacher told me about it. 

The librarian told my class about it. 

I heard about it at the library. 

Some other way. 

I don't remember. 



More questions on the next page... 



* Survey from: Walter, Virginia A. Output Measures for Public Library Services to Children . Chicago, 
ALA, 1992. 



O 

ERIC 



31 



Summer Reading Program Survey* (continued) 



5. Make a check mark in front of the library activities that you took part in this summer. Draw a 
happy face after the activities that you especially enjoyed. 

Reading books 

Story hours 

Awards ceremony 

Magic show 

Film programs 

6. What did you think of the prizes this summer? Check the right answers. You can check more than 
one answer. 

I didn't get any prizes. 

Great! 

Okay. 

Dumb. 

I don't care one way or the other. 

7. What did you think of the theme of the Summer Reading Program? Check the right answer. 
I didn't pay any attention to the theme. 

I liked it. 

I didn't like it. 

I don't care one way or the other. 

8. Tell us anything else you think we should know about the Summer Reading Program. You may 
write on the back of the page. 

Thank you for answering our questions. Please give this form to the librarian today. 



* Survey from: Walter, Virginia A. Output Measures for Public Library Services to Children. Chicago, 
ALA, 1992. 




32 



)] 

Cuestionario del programa de lectura de verano 



Por favor toma unos minutos para contestar las siguientes preguntas. Tus respuestas nos ayudar&n a mejorar 
el programa de lectura de verano en el prdximo ano. 



1 . 

2. 



^Cudntos anos tienes? . 



^Eres un nino o una nina? Pon un circulo alrededor de la respuesta correcta. 

Nino Nina 

Pon una marca al costado de las actividades en que participaste este verano. 

Escuela de verano. 

Vacaciones de familia. 

Clases de natacidn. 

Otro tipo de clases. 

Campamento. 

^Como te enteraste del programa de lectura de varano? Por favor marca la respuesta correcta. Tu 
puedes marcar mas de una respuesta. 

Mi madre o padre me lo dijo. 

Mi maestro(a) me lo dijo. 

El/la bibliotecario(a) se lo dijo a mi clase. 

Me enterd de ello en la biblioteca. 

Amigos me lo dijeron. 

Me enterd de otra manera. 

No me acuerdo. 



Mas preguntas en la prdxima pdgina... 



* Survey from: Walter, Virginia A. Output Measures for Public Library Services to Children. Chicago, 
ALA, 1992. 




33 



Cuestionario del programa de lectura de verano * (continuar) 

5. Marque las actividades de la biblioteca en que participaste. Dibuja una cara sonriente al costado de 
las actividades que m<£s te gustaron. 

Leer libros. 

Horas de cuento. 

Ceremonia de premios. 

Programa de magia. 

Programas de pelicula. 

6. 6Q u ^ te parecieron los premios de este verano? Marca las respuestas correctas. Tu puedes marcar 
mas de una respuesta. 

No recibf ningun premio. 

jEstupendo! 

Bueno. 

Tonto. 

No me importa. 

7. iQu€ tal te parecid el tema del programa de lectura de este verano? Marca la respuesta correcta. 
No me fijd del tema. 

Me gustd. 

No me gusto. 

No me importa. 

8. Cudntanos cualquier otra cosa que necesitamos saber acerca del programa de lectura de verano. 
Puedes escribir al otro lado de esta p£gina. 

Gracias por haber contestado nuestras preguntas. Por favor entregue este forma a el/la 
bibliotecario(a) hoy dfa. 



* Survey from: Walter, Virginia A. Output Measures for Public Library Services to Children. Chicago, 
ALA, 1992. 




34 



Preschool Story Hour Survey* 



Please take a few minutes to answer these questions. We are interested in knowing how you and the child 
you bring to the library respond to Preschool Story Hour. 



1. How old is the child you bring to Preschool Story Hour? 

2. Approximately how many times did you attend Preschool Story Hour this year? _ 

3. Do you check out books for your child when you come to Preschool Story Hour? Circle the best 
answer. 

Always Never Sometimes Don't Know 

4. Does your child remember and repeat the rhymes and finger plays that he or she hears at preschool 
story hour? Circle the best answer. 

Always Never Sometimes Don't Know 

5. Does the content of the Preschool Story Hour seem appropriate for your child? Circle the best 
answer. 

Always Never Sometimes Don't Know 

6. Do you use the follow-up activity sheet with your child? Circle the best answer. 

Always Never Sometimes Don't Know 

7. Would you recommend that a friend bring his or her child to Preschool Story Hour? Circle the best 
answer. 

Yes No Maybe Don't Know 



Is there anything else you'd like to tell us about your experience with Preschool Story Hour? 
Please feel free to use the back of the page. 



Thank you for answering our questions. Please leave this form with the librarian today. 



* Survey from: Walter, Virginia A. Output Measures for Public Library Services to Children. Chicago, 
ALA, 1992. 



35 



o 



Cuestionario de la hora de cuentos para ninos preescolares* 

Por favor tome unos cuantos minutos para contestar estas preguntas. Nosotros estamos interestados en saber 
como usted y el/la nino(a) que usted trae a la biblioteca reaccionan a la hora de cuentos para ninos 
preescolares. 

1. ^Cuantos anos tiene el/la nino(a) que usted trae a la hora de cuentos? 

2. ^Aproximadamente cuantos veces han asistido a la hora de cuentos este ano? 

3. ^Saca libros para su nino(a) cuando vienen a la hora de cuentos? Pon un circulo alrededor de la 
major respuesta. 

Siempre Nunca A veces No se 

4. ^El/la nino se acuerda y repite las rimas y los juegos de dedos que el o ella escucha en la hora de 
cuentos. 

Siempre Nunca A veces No se 

5. ^Es el contenido del la hora de cuentos apropriado para su nino(a)? 

Siempre Nunca A veces No se 

6. <i,Usa las hojas de actividades de proseguimiento con su nino(a)? 

Siempre Nunca A veces No se 

7. ^Recomendarfa a un amigo(a) a que traiga a su nino(a) a la hora de cuentos? 

Si No Quizas No se 

8. /,Hay algo que quisiera contarnos acerca de su experiencia con la hora de cuentos? Sientase libre 
de escribir en el otro lado de esta pagina. 



Gracias por haber contestado nuestras preguntas. Por favor deja este cuestionario con el/la 
bibliotecario(a) hoy dia. 



Survey from: Walter, Virginia A. Output Measures for Public Library Services to Children. Chicago, 
ALA, 1992. 



READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA GETTING STARTED! 



CO 

CO 



i- 

00 




IREAD: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



GETTING STARTED | 



Opinions vary among librarians as to the structure and formats of reading programs. Some libraries present a 
highly structured Reading Program during the summer; some have no formal structure at all; and most fall 
somewhere between these two extremes. 

For instance, one library discovered that having a required reading list and requiring that a minimum number of 
books be read This turned off the children in their program to the point that only 45% finished the program and 
received certificates. However, the children still seemed to enjoy the oral reports portion of their program, so 
the library changed the program to a contract system. Oral reports were given in a group sharing situation or 
two children shared a book they had recently read, with others in the group. 

Another library totally abandoned any type of structured program and provided various activities in which the 
children could freely participate. A third library was very successful with a formal structured program in which 
the children were required to read a certain number of books to receive a certificate. 



These varied program philosophies appear to result from the reasons why librarians do a Reading Program. To 
find out which is best for, you must first review your philosophy of programming, and in particular your 
philosophy on Reading Programs. 

When you have reviewed your philosophies, ideas, and experiences, consider the following items that may also 
affect your program: 



A. 

B. 

C. 

D. 

E. 

F. 

A. 

B. 

C. 

D. 

E. 



Facilities 

What amount of space is available and for what size group? 

What size is your group? 

Will the excessive noise level disturb other patrons using the library or is a separate room available for 
busy activities? 

Is there a play area available for outdoor activities? Is a local park available for opening or closing parties? 
How long will the programs be, and how often will they meet? 

Will decorations and displays be put up in the area? 

Staff 

How large is the staff? 

Does regular or volunteer staff, increase or decrease in size during the summer months? Are older youths 
used as volunteer helpers for your program? 

How much time does staff, and volunteers have to participate in the program? Is it a key time for staff 
vacations? 

Can parents of participants help with activities or perhaps provide refreshments? 

rev. 10/95 

What special talents can staff, parents, and volunteers contribute to the program? (i.e., musical, arts & 
crafts, and drama) 




15 



[READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA~ 



GETTING STARTED | 



Participants 

A. What is the maximum number of children you can accomodate? 

B. Will there be age limitations? 

C. Are participants broken up into groups based upon age, reading skills, grade level, or do they participate as 
one large group? 

D. Will a Read-to-Me program for pre-schoolers be offered? 

Collection 

A. Does the library need to purchase materials from the bibliography provided in the Arizona Reading 
Program (ARP) manual, collection? 

B. Will bibliographies of your local resources be printed for the participants as supplemental handouts to 
the program? 



Scheduling 

A. Decide when and how registration for the program will begin in the library. 

B. Contact local newspapers, radio stations, and possible television stations to find out what their deadlines 
are for publicity. 

C. What kind of school visit, if any, will there be? (i.e., thematic skit given, book talks, handout flyers or a 
short narrative on the program?) 

D. Alert all other library staff as to the dates of the programs and the special events. 



Budget 

A. What arts and craft supplies do you have or can you purchase? 

B. What craft materials, prizes or incentives can be donated by local merchants? 

C. Will participants be asked to provide their own supplies for certain activities? 

D. Will it be necessary to purchase promotional materials in addition to those which the state provides free? 

E. Is it necessary to ask for additional money for performer's fees, overhead costs — rental space, or additional 
publicity (flyer)? 

rev. 10/95 

F. Is it possible to have a fundraising project to add to the available revenue for the program? Can your 
Library Friends group help? 



40 

o 

ERIC 



16 



I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



GETTING STARTED | 




Miscellaneous 



A. Can field trips be planned and completed? 

B. How can you use guest speakers, musicians, artists, and story tellers in your program? 

C. What kind of support might you obtain from various merchants and civic groups for the program? 

D. Has anyone else developed an activity or idea that had great success that could be used in the program? 

Questions like these, along with an understanding of your personal interests and philosophy and the particular 
needs of your community, will help build the foundation on which the structure of your Reading Program will 
be based. 




rev. 10/95 




ERIC 




READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA COMMON PROGRAM STRUCTURES 



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CM 

" 3 1 




IREAD: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA COMMON PROGRAM STRUCTURES | 

Structured Programs 

Formally structured programs format allow the librarian more control over the participants' reading. However, 
they require a larger staff and a larger collection of material. Below are some items to consider in setting up a 
structured program. 

1 . Set age limits for children participating. 

It is desirable to offer something for all age groups. If you only have time for one program, then try to reach an 
age group not normally served during the rest of the year. For example, if there is a story time during the winter 
for pre-schoolers, offer something for school age children during the summer. 

2. Determine the number of books/number of minute’s children must read to get a certificate. 

Try not to set the requirement so high that it will discourage children from reading or encourage "cheating" by 
way of reading below their level. It is important to remember that the slow reader, the learning disadvantaged 
and the handicapped child needs to feel that they belong. If you decide you want to require a certain number of 
books/number of minutes to be read by the participants, keep the number within a reasonable limit. Determine 
the length of your program and the average reading ability among your patrons. Make special provision for 
those children who are poor or non-readers to earn a certificate in some other way. 

3. Create required reading lists. 

Compile a list of books that reflect the theme of the Arizona Reading Program. 

4. Avoid competitive programs. 

If a library's main thrust is to reward the child who reads the most books, then the interest of the poor reader is 
lost. It is as great an accomplishment if the slow reader gets through one or two books as it is if the bookworm 
gets through 50 to 100. Make sure rewards are available to everyone. 

5. Encourage oral or written reports. 

Oral reports, while very time consuming, give the librarian and the child time to discuss books and gives the 
librarian an opportunity to determine in which direction to guide the child in future reading. Written reports 
stimulate the thinking and writing skills of the child. 

NOTE: Be careful not to exclude any child because of handicap, reading ability, noncompetitive attitude or 
even part-time status in the program. 



Nonstructured Programs 

This format works best for small libraries with limited staff or volunteer resources. It is marvelous for the child 
who is looking for a non-classroom type summer activity. 

1 . Any child may participate. 

2. There is no required reading list or minimum number of reports. 



44 



IREAD: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA~ 



COMMON PROGRAM STRUCTURES] 



Any child who has participated by reading at least one book or by participating in one activity may receive a 
certificate. 

Design displays and special interest lists, but allow children to choose their own books from the library 
collection. 



3. Children keep their own reading records for personal satisfaction. 

4. If the child moves or goes on vacation to another part of the state and the local library there has a summer 
reading program, the child may continue the program with them. 

Contracts or Individual Goal Setting 

1 . Do not require a minimum or maximum number of books to be read. 

2. Children set personal goals of how many books to read. 

3. Draw up individual contracts between the children and the librarian delineating the agreed goal. 

4. Sign contracts before beginning the program or when the children read their first books. 

5. Do not quiz children on the books they have read. 

6. Make no restrictions on the type of literature to be read. Encourage children to read at or above their 
current reading level. 



Read-To-Me Programs 

Although Summer Reading Programs have traditionally been directed at children who have learned to read, in 
recent years many libraries have also offered Read-To-Me programs for preschool children. Offer these in 
conjunction with the Summer Reading Program using the same or a different theme or at a different time of the 
year as a separate promotional activity. 

A Read-To-Me program involves parents and children reading together. Children get credit for each book read 
to them. Award a certificate or other small prize upon completion of a certain number of books. The library 
may issue reading records and/or have a bulletin board or display where children keep track of the number of 
books read. 

The Read-To-Me program can be an excellent activity to implement with groups of preschoolers who attend 
story hour in the library or whom the librarian visits at a child care center. Center staff could introduce the 
program to parents and encourage them to join and use the library to complete the program. The library and 
center could give a joint certificate. This could be a good way to reach those parents who may not read to their 
children or be regular library users. 





20 



1 READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



COMMON PROGRAM STRUCTURES] 



PROGRAM OUTLINE 



A. Audience: 

Preschoolers (3-5 years) and their parent(s) / caregiver(s). 



B. Step-by-step mechanics: 



PLANNING 

Provide a "club" for these preschoolers and their parents or caregiver(s). Plan the club several months in advance. 
Write an invitational letter to the caregiver(s) to explain the "club". Organize an initial meeting for the caregiver(s). 
Provide the handout to caregiver(s), How to Read Aloud With Your Child (see below). 

Invite caregiver(s) by letter to attend a story hour. Also, make the letter available at the librarian’s desk. Caregiver(s) 
should also receive a pamphlet about summer reading and a list of recommended books for the child. 

PRESENTATION 

Hold a meeting before the beginning of the program. Acquaint the caregiver(s) with the program and schedule 
individual meetings with the caregiver(s). 

Caregiver(s) and child select books each week. At home, the caregiver(s) read the books to the child several times 
duing the week. This is done until the child has "learned" the stories. Encourage caregiver(s) to discuss the stories, 
the illustrations, and any concepts related to the stories with the child. The caregiver(s) and child return to the library 
where the child may tell the story to the librarian, using the book. The caregiver(s) is / are present in case the child is 
bashful and needs prompting. 

C. Supplies 

A reading log to list the books each child reads. Distribute copies of You Can Encourage Your Child to Read and 
How to Read Aloud With Your Child. Prepare certificates and posters. 



1. You must like the story. You are more likely to draw an emotional reaction, if you are involved with the story 
yourself. 

2. Books well written have vivid characterization and the pace is fairly fast — more action, and less description. 

3. Five to ten minutes may be plenty of time to read to your child, because most pre-schoolers have short attention 
spans. 

4. The real test of a good book is its ability to give pleasure to both parent and child. Listening provides natural 
opportunities for development of vocabulary and an acquaintance with English syntax. 

MOST IMPORTANTLY, you help your child to know good books and poems in a relaxed, warm atmosphere. 



On the following page are two lists of tips for parents. You may wish to photocopy them and provide them to parents when they 
register their children for the Reading Program. 



Basic Guidelines For Selecting Material To Read Aloud 




21 



READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



COMMON PROGRAM STRUCTURES 



A Word (or 2) For Parents 
How to Read Aloud With Your Child 

1. PLAN AHEAD. Choose a time when there will not be interruptions; if possible have a regular time each day. 

2. SELECT A QUIET, COMFORTABLE PLACE. Sit so your child can see the pictures easily-on your lap or 
near you. 

3. SELECT SEVERAL BOOKS ahead of time that you think he/she will enjoy; read through them, yourself before 
sharing them so you can read smoothly. 

4. TRY TO READ IN A NATURAL VOICE that’s soft, low and interested. 

5. BEGIN WITH THE FAMILIAR such as Mother Goose, finger plays, songs, poems, etc. 

6. PAUSE AT INTERVALS. This gives your child a chance to react to the story and the illustrations. 

7. RESPECT YOUR CHILD'S MOOD. Boredom or restlessness perhaps indicate the book or time isn't right. If 
he/she doesn't want to discuss the pictures, don't step-up the pace. Your child may want to turn several pages to 
finish more quickly. Let her/him. 



DOs 

Take advantage of your child's interests, e.g., dinosaurs, trucks, etc. 

Keep books around even if he/she shows little interest in them right now. 

Ask questions as you read. 

Encourage your child to make up his/her own stories to go with the pictures. 

As your child reaches school age, begin to include longer stories that can be read one episode or chapter at a time. 
An example is Graham s The Wind in the Willows. 



DONTs 



Use story time to teach reading. 

Compare your child to another who loves reading. 

Be surprised if your child wants to hear the same book repeatedly. The high interest and repetition will be good for 
him/her. 



47 



22 



IREAD: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA PLANNING TIMELINE~| 



CD 




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o 

ERLC 



I REAP: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



PLANNING TIMELINE* 1 



The following list of tasks can be used to build a timeline. Remember to keep a monthly calendar with 
important dates marked. Planning calendars are included at the end of this chapter. 

4 -5 Months Prior to Beginning of Summer 

1 . Review the manual thoroughly. Read over the activity sheets to plan for required materials. 

2. Choose dates, structure and procedures of the program. 

3. Check State Library Reading Program materials request form to be sure an accurate number of items has 
been ordered. 

4. Create a calendar for tentative scheduling of programs. 

5. Look for local talent and volunteers. Staff and patrons may have special talents and interests to share. 

6. Order books to enrich the theme and order any media for programs. Check bibliography against holdings. 
Consider paperbacks to supplement where needed. 

7. Send letters to Friends of the Library and community organizations asking for donations. 

2-3 Months Prior to Summer 

1 . Finalize program schedules. Plan alternate programs in case of cancellations. 

2. Confirm films, performers and craft dates. You may want to "kid test” crafts. 

3. Order material for crafts. 

4. Check AV equipment and repair as necessary. Buy extra lamps. 

5. Prepare flyers with information about the program. Distribute to children and parents at schools and at the 
circulation desk. 

6. Prepare bulletin board materials. 

7. Prepare needed materials for volunteers. 

8. Send letters to Friends of the Library and community organizations asking for volunteer helpers. 



3*0 



I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



PLANNING TIMELINE*] 



1 Month Prior to Beginning of Summer 

1. Place posters in the community and in the library. 

2. Visit newspapers, radio and TV stations to explain your publicity needs and take your first press release. 
This approach is advisable only in smaller communities. 

3. Arrange and make school visits. Do not forget private and church schools in the area. It may be necessary 
to concentrate on certain grades due to time limitations. Distribute flyers during your visits and ask to have 
notices put in the school's last newsletter or in flyers sent' home with report cards. Remember the parent 
groups or organizations like Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts and day care groups in your community. 

2-3 Weeks Prior to Summer 

1. Have staff meetings about the programs planned and pass out schedules. 

2. Begin decorating the library. 

3. Make packets for registration. Try to include reading records, schedule of events and membership cards. 

Remember to write these schedules and events on the calendar. How many weeks will the Reading Program 
run? What day will you clear school visits with the principal and the librarians of each school? When does 
school end? What are the other events in town? (For example when does the pool open, camps begin, or little 
leagues have play-offs?) When will registration for the library reading program begin? End? What are the print 
deadlines for local school newspapers, community newspapers, church bulletins, community or civic club 
newsletters? When will you put up posters in the schools, in the community? What days will you have special 
activities? Will there be a special opening event and closing celebration? What is the staffs’ vacation schedule? 
Will you have an orientation for staff, volunteers and friends group? 

When you have developed your timeline and finish as many of the reading programs dates as possible, 
publicize them in your opening announcements. Be sure everyone knows about the events happening in the 
library, so other activities won't be scheduled that will compete with the library. It is a good idea to include a 
list of activities in newspaper publicity throughout the reading program to remind other program planners of 
your schedule.* 



* Adapted with permission from the Tennessee State Library and Archives from Cool Cats/Hot Books Summer 
Reading Program Manual ©1989. 




24 



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IREAD: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA PUBLICITY & PROMOTION | 



I''" 




co 

I s - 



o 

ERLC 



I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



PUBLICITY AND PROMOTION | 



Preparing Printed Matter* 

Face-to-face public relations and promotion for specific programs are a much easier job when accompanied by 
something tangible to hand out. Printed matter always helps underscore the message and leave a physical 
reminder of the program. Publicity pieces for the Arizona Reads Program can be as simple as a bookmark or 
flier. Reproduction by a quick printer for large quantities or a good copier for smaller needs is inexpensive. 



The clip art for the Arizona Reads Program is yours to adapt and use however you like. Reduce it, enlarge it, 
reposition it, cut it up, color it, whatever. 

Use a variety of techniques to prepare professional-looking custom information on printed matter. If you have 
access to a copier that reduces and enlarges, transform simple typewritten copy into a larger, bolder version, 
ready to paste-up in a layout. 

Art or graphic supply stores, and quite a few stationers, carry a wide variety of "rub-on" lettering. One or two 
sheets of lettering should be enough to see you through all your printed pieces. It is relatively easy to use the 
letters. Suggestion: apply the letter to a separate sheet of white paper, then cut the set type out and past it to 
the layout. Set type line-by-line, cutting out and placing each line of type individually in relation to the other 
lines of type. This technique prevents tragic and unsightly placement of letters directly on a layout, and lets you 
play with your arrangement a little before you commit it to glue. 

Professional typesetting is not terribly expensive. Take just a few headlines, your library’s name, address, the 
pertinent facts of your program to be set, and then photocopy the additional copies and sizes you need at the 
library. Nearly any mechanical means of typesetting, including typewriter copy, looks more professional than 
hand-done lettering. UNLESS YOU’RE A WHIZ CALLIGRAPHER, RESIST THE TEMPTATION TO 
HAND-LETTER! 



The Importance of an Information Form 

When you solicit monetary support for your program, be it in kind support, museum passes, ice cream coupons 
or a feature story in the newspaper, include a business-like fact sheet in addition to your printed publicity 
pieces. The fact sheet should include: 

• the purpose of the Arizona Reads Program 

• who will be involved in the program, and how participants will benefit 

• dates, times, and locations 

• this year’s theme 

• special plans for the summer 

• what kind of help the library needs 

• who to contact at the library for more information 

• statistics from previous years* past programs and themes 



* Adapted with permission from the Tennessee State Library and Archives Cool Cats/Hot Books Summer 
Reading Program Manual , ©1989. 



o 



35 



I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



PUBLICITY AND PROMOTION | 



Having a background sheet that includes details lets potential sponsors, helpers and reporters know that you're 
serious and organized about your program. It can save much time for you in terms of answering philosophical 
questions or explaining the reasons for the program. 



Person to Person Contact 

Nothing makes people more likely to come to the library than a personal invitation. Failing a personal 
invitation, a judiciously posted flier can work wonders. If you can possibly spare the time to get out in the 
community, you'll find that your efforts are worth it. Arm yourself with bookmarks and visit the classrooms to 
talk with kids. If you can’t spare the time, use the mail! Write a peppy cover letter and mail bookmarks to the 
school principal for distribution to the students. Ask to speak to PTA groups and for announcement space in 
their newsletters. Catch kids and parents where they are: send library staff home with fliers to post at their 
neighborhood stores. Take a pile of bookmarks to your local bookstore and ask them to give bookmarks out 
with purchases. Call upon all those organizations who post notices at the library to post notices for you, or to 
mention your program in their newsletters. Freely mail your information to any adult who seems interested, and 
of course, use it if you're soliciting goods or money. 

Perhaps the best public relations you do at the library itself are promoting the programs to the parents and 
children who use the library. These are the most likely candidates for your program. Inform your staff of every 
last detail of the Arizona Reads Program and spend several weeks letting everybody who walks through the 
door with Arizona Reads Program information and encouragement. Post fliers and posters generously around 
the library and put your reading sign-up station in a conspicuous spot. Create a splashy display. Post the kids' 
names as they join. Attract attention and encourage questions. 



Handling the Media 

The library has many allies in the community, and media people are among them. Don't be shy about asking for 
coverage. Assume you're on friendly ground and tell your story around! 



Newspaper Features 

Newspaper stories are wonderful program packers. No other medium allows you so much time and space to tell 
your story. You can usually get in all your nitty-gritty details and still have time to philosophize about the 
greater meaning of the Arizona Reads Program. Drop off a packet of information materials (your information 
form and other pertinent pieces) to the newspaper. With a small community newspaper, call the editor and talk 
about doing a feature article. Include a news release, written in narrative form, that explains your program 
briefly. 

Double space your news release, and begin typing your copy on the lower half of the page, continuing your 
narrative on succeeding pages, if necessary. It is best to keep to one page and add a fact sheet. This spacing 
allows room for editorial comments, notes, and other comments. Make it clear in a cover letter that the 
materials are adaptable and that the paper is free to use them in any way they see Fit. Many community papers 
will use your writing verbatim; others will adapt the writing or write their own feature articles. Make it easy for 
editors to find you or your contact person for interviews or to answer questions. Many papers are glad for you 
to come in and talk to them personally; find out on the phone what they prefer. If your paper gives you a feature 
story on the Arizona Reads Program at the beginning of the summer, ask them then about doing a follow-up 
story at the end of the summer. How programs turn out interests most newspapers. 

Whenever possible, include a photograph with your press release. Photos are always more eye-catching than 
just text, and editors love them because photos of local people (especially kids) sell papers! Send clear black- 
and-white pictures. 



79 




36 



I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



PUBLICITY AND PROMOTION | 



Radio Public Service Announcements 

Never underestimate the power of the radio. People listen. All radio stations, to maintain their broadcast 
licenses, are obligated to run public service announcements (PSAs) regularly, free of charge to community 
organizations. Most are more than happy to receive PSAs and graciously give good airplay to them. Most 
stations would prefer to receive a typed PSA that announcers can read off the cuff at various intervals instead of 
a produced, taped spot that they must plan to use. Ask the station for a taped or live on-air interview about your 
program. If interviews are featured regularly on your station, you might just want to pursue this. All you need to 
do to get a PSA on the air is to mail it in. Call the stations switchboard to find out the name of the Public 
Service Director and mail your announcement to that person. A simple cover letter requesting support for the 
program assures air-time. A few rules of thumb govern the writing of PSAs: 

Always include, at the top of your PSA, the following information: 

DATE: (Date you’re sending the announcement out) 

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT RE: (Brief description) 

PROGRAM DATE: (Date your program starts) 

AIR DATES: (Choose a time period over which you want announcement made) 

FOR MORE INFORMATION: (Your contact person’s name & telephone) 

TIME: (10 sec., 20 sec., 30 sec., etc.) 

Double-space your announcement for easy reading. Use ALL CAPS for the same reason. Make sure your 
announcement and header information (above) all fits on one page. You may want to send in several PSAs of 
varying lengths, to give the announcers a choice. Send each one on a separate sheet, each with the same header 
information. 

Keep your messages within the 10-, 20-, or 30-second limit. Time it yourself, reading at a normal pace, to make 
sure. Always include the pertinent information in your announcement: Who, What, When, Where, and How to 
get more information. There’s no time in a 30-second announcement to get to the Why — spend your remaining 
seconds on a catchy invitation. 



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Television Announcements 



Television stations must provide public service time, too. Many have noon or morning "magazine" shows that 
include a regular segment of time for community announcements. All you need to do to get your 
announcements read during these times is call the station to find out who coordinates announcements for the 
show, and mail your information to that person. 

Getting a stand-alone public service announcement on television (one that is run in a string of commercials 
during regular programming) is a little more complicated. You must call the Public Service Director at the 
station to arrange this. Taped public service announcements must be shot on 3/4" videotape (home cameras use 
1/2" tape), and are difficult for most libraries without studios to produce. You may be able to talk your local 
station's Public Service Director into filming a spot for you and duplicating it for other stations in the area. 
Before approaching a station about doing this, you must have a script and scene in mind. It's much easier for 
them to make a decision if they have some idea what it’s going to involve. If a taped PSA is out of the question, 
most stations will accept a slide and an announcement. They will hold the slide on screen while they run a taped 
voice-over of your announcement. Wording should be similar to radio spots— nothing longer is appropriate. 
Your slide can be a "reproduction" of the Arizona Reads Program artwork. Make it colorful. When shooting 
slides for television, remember to leave a very wide border around your actual copy. Not all of slide or picture 
shows on a television screen. Do not use white as a background color; white shimmers and glares on TV. Slides 
of library activities might also be appropriate for PSAs: keep your main visual idea restricted to the center area 
of the slide. 

*A MAJOR WORD OF CAUTION ABOUT TELEVISION ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Television is an incredibly regional medium. Always bear in mind the impact your announcement will have on 
other libraries than your own. Your announcements may be seen by viewers over many counties — and 
everybody’s library has a different thing going regarding program specifics such as dates, events, awards, and 
so forth. Keep your TV PSAs generic enough so they won't cause heartbreak or utter chaos in somebody else's 
library. Call around to other libraries in your viewing area and get their feelings on the issues before you 
approach the TV people. 



TV News Coverage 



Gtj) for it! If you have an event (an event, not a summer-long program) that’s newsworthy, call the News 
Director at your station. Be very specific about what a camera might see, how many people are expected to be 
there, and how many kids participate. Paint a colorful picture and tempt the news people with a good ’’parting 
shot” on the nightly news. Tell the News Director you’ll drop off some background information at the station, 
then do it. (Include your information for the Arizona Reads Program, and any other pertinent materials you 
have on hand.) Add a separate sheet that gives details on the event you’re wanting covered: time, place, what’s 
happening when, and what good visuals they might find. News people can never commit to coverage ahead of 
time (you’re up against national news and local house fires) but most are willing to seriously consider library 
stories, especially when kids are involved. 




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Letter to Parents 



Dear 

Each summer the Public Library provides a summer reading program for the children of the 

community. It is an important program designed to help children in our community maintain their reading skills 
during the summer recess from school. Studies have shown that unless a special effort is made to prevent it, 
there is a substantial loss of reading skills during the summer vacation. 

Another goal of summer reading is to help the children discover the pleasure of recreational reading. We are 
constantly looking for ways to entice the non-reader and low level reader to read since the best way to improve 
a child’s reading ability is to get them to read. Our program is designed to be fun as well as educational. 

We are asking for your help in providing this important program for the children of 

We are asking businesses and individuals to contribute to help pay for the reading incentives 

the children earn by reading books. Your donation will be used for things such as purchasing tee shirts for 
children participating, prizes for children who read the most books and other incentives to encourage children 
to read, read, read! 

We have an exciting program planned for this year and we hope that you will want to help make it happen. 
Please feel free to contact (Librarian ) at (Phone Number) if you have any questions or if 

you would like more information. We would appreciate a response by (date) , so that we may plan 

accordingly. 

Thank you for your time and consideration. 



Sincerely, 



(Name) 

(Library) 



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PUBLICITY AND PROMOTION 



"KIDS SPORT CARD SHOW* 



Finally a card show just for kids. All spaces are reserved for kids. 
Adults are welcome to come and buy. 

Sponsored by - Your Library 

Date - 
Time - 
Place - 

Cost- 1. can be time spent reading 

2. number of books read 

3. or a fee 

BUY SELL OR TRADE - The money is yours to keep 



Summer Reading Program 



All you SPORT CARD FANS come out and support these kids. 



Please run this article through (DATE) 

Any Help You Can Give Us Will Be Greatly Appreciated. 

Thank you! 

Sincerely, 



(Librarians Name) 
Children’s Librarian 



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PUBLICITY AND PROMOTION 


SAMPLE NEWS RELEASE 






From: 


(Library) 


Date: 


(Current Date) 




(Street) 


Contact: 


(Name) 




(City/State/Zip) 




(Phone) 


RE: 


Reading Program 


Release Date: 



READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



At the Public Library, we are gearing up for a summer of learning about America’s regional 

differences, & exploring bridges across America. READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA, covers everything 

from songfests to crafts and games. If you are between the ages of and , join the Arizona 

library "readers" at (name of library) . You will read great books, play exciting games, and 

see musicians, storytellers and magicians. You will have a simply stupendous time this summer! Call or come 
by the public library for more information. 



SAMPLE NEWS RELEASE II 



From: 


(Library) 


Date: (Current Date) 




(Street) 


Contact: (Name) 




(City/State/Zip) 


(Phone) 


RE: 


Reading Program 


Release Date: 



SUMMER READING PROGRAM RETURNS 

The Arizona Reads Program is back again this summer at (name of library) This year, our theme is 

READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA. Kids ages to are invited to join the library staff in a 

whole new adventure revolving around America’s cultural diversity. Enjoy a summer filled with crafts, games, 

puzzles, performers, artists, movies, stories and more! Come by (name of library) or call us at 

to sign up for READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA. 



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PUBLICITY AND PROMOTION 



SAMPLE NEWS RELEASE III 



From: (Library) 

(Street) 

(City/State/Zip) 
RE: Reading Program 



Date: 

Contact: 



(Current Date) 

(Name) 

(Phone) 



Release Date: 



READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 

READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA, activities with a local twist, is the theme for this year's Arizona 

Reads Program at the Public Library. Open to children ages to this weekly program 

encourages and emphasizes the joys of reading, through educational and fun summer activities. Every child will 
be a winner with reading! 



The children may begin to register for the program on 



j, activities begin 



The 



Public Library is located at 



and you may telephone 



(coordinator) at 



for additional information about the program. 



O 

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FOLLOW-UP NEWS RELEASE 



From: 


(Library) 


Date: (Current Date) 




(Street) 


Contact: (Name) 




(City/State/Zip) 


(Phone) 


RE: 


Reading Program 


Release Date: 



READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



More than young people participated in READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA, the Arizona 

Reads program held at the (name of library) . The program provided by the Arizona 

Department of Library, Archives and Public Records, the Arizona Humanities Council, and local libraries, was 
a huge success! Performers who gave presentations at the library were (list names and their specialty). 

Librarian reports that children's programming will continue this fall with (indicate 

plans and dates). ^ 




1 



Adapted with permission from Dorothy White, State Library of Louisiana, Summer Reading Program. 




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SAMPLE PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT I 



From: (Name of Library) 


Date: 


(Current Date) 


RE: Reading Program 


Air Dates: 


Time Period for 
Announcement 


Program Date: (Date Program Starts) 


Contact: 


(Name) 

(Telephone Number) 


Time: 







READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA is this year's Arizona Reads Program theme. Because it is a 
millennium summer, the library is sponsoring its own millennium style events. Here are some of the activities 
that will be taking place at the public library: (list here) 



Call the (name of library) at for more 

information. Brought to you by your local library and the Arizona Department of Library, Archives and Public 
Records and the Arizona Humanities Council . 2 



1 Adapted with permission from Dorothy White, State Library of Louisiana, Summer Reading Program. 



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SAMPLE PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT II 



From: (Name of Library) 


Date: 


(Current Date) 


RE: Reading Program 


Air Dates: 


(Time Period for 
Announcement) 


Program Date: (Date Program Starts) 


Contact: 


(Name) 






(Telephone Number) 



Celebrate a millennium summer! Make crafts! Play games! Listen to storytellers, magicians! Create and invent! 

Be a player in our library millennium events! The (name of library) is sponsoring 

READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA as this summer's Arizona Reads Program. If you are between the 
ages of and , join the fun with the Arizona Reads Program. 




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FINAL NEWS RELEASE 

From: (Name of Library) 

(Street) 

(City/State/Zip) 
RE: Reading Program 



Date: (Current Date) 

Contact: (Name) 

(Telephone Number) 

Release Date: 



READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 

READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA was the name of the 2000 Arizona Reads Program held at the 

(name of library) And there were lots of local winners! (Number of children) discovered the joy of 

reading and were entertained by competitions, craftmaking, storytellers, activities, magicians, all at the library. 

Over a period of weeks , more than (number) (books or minutes) were enthusiastically read by the 

participants. Children received prizes such as (list some here) as they met reading goals. Local 

sponsors included (list here, if any) . In conjunction with the program, (number) 

people attended special events held at the library. 

For information about programs at the Library this (month) you 

may telephone at . The library is located at . 



READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



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It is very important during your reading program to recognize the progress your participants are making. Do 
this in one of two ways. The first is through incentives: items you receive from the State library or items 
donated by the local merchants or items you purchase yourself. The second way you recognize your readers is 
to give each participant a certificate. 



Awarding Certificates 

Award the certificates at the end-of-summer celebration through schools, after school begins, or individually as 

children complete requirements. 

1. Many libraries plan special programs or parties to wind up the Reading Program on a festive note. If the 
library distributes certificates at a final celebration, make it seem special. Perhaps the library can have a 
special guest, such as a local official, to help give out certificates. Libraries who have done this reported 
that they had many unclaimed certificates, and indicated that this process needs a back-up distribution 
system. 

2. If the library plans to distribute certificates in the fall through the schools, contact the schools for approval 
in the spring. Ask to be able to do this at an assembly if possible. 

3. Some libraries give certificates to children as they complete requirements. This has the advantage of 
solving the problem of unclaimed certificates at the summer's end. However, it may make children feel 
they have finished the program and thus finished the reading for the summer. If you use this approach, be 
sure staff tells the children as they award certificates that they hope the children will keep reading and 
visiting the library. The library can still have an end-of-the-summer party without the certificate 
distribution. 



Incentives 

Many libraries like to give children some other small token for completing the program. There are arguments 
for and against prizes, but library budgets generally ensure they are very modest. Hint: Do not save something 
for a prize that is better used as a promotional item early in the program. 

1 . There are many ways in which public libraries can reward children for participating in the library’s reading 
program. Incentives ranging in cost from bookmarks printed by the state library to T-shirts (one of the 
more expensive prizes) with the program slogan. Free tickets and coupons are also good incentives. For 
example, one year the Houston Astros, Denny’s, and Whataburger supported a summer reading program by 
providing free tickets to Astros games, coupons for free snacks at Denny's, and free Whataburgers. One 
library provided top readers with such incentives as coupons for free mini-pizzas (Pizza Hut is usually 
willing), ice cream sundaes and movie tickets. Larger rewards, such as sun visors and wrap-around sun 
glasses, while still low cost may be provided by the Friends of the Library. 

2. Buttons are extremely popular with the children. One year a library discontinued passing out club buttons 
to the children enrolled. They found out from the resulting outcry that the buttons were an important part of 
the whole program. Kids collected the buttons from the first time they enroll and built collections that they 
valued highly. The following year they brought the buttons back, and reading jumped 10%. Many of the 
sources listed in the appendix (starting on page Q- 11) offer buttons a minimal price; if you have button- 
making machines, volunteers could design and make them for your program. 

3. Another way to stimulate the interest of children in th. xeading Program is to introduce computers. One 
library borrowed four Apple computers. Kids registered themselves on the computers. They kept track of 
their own scores as they played the reading game on a Monopoly-like game board. The kids read in 
specified subject areas for extra points, drew picture book reports, participated in the weekly trivia contest, 
and attended library programs. One of their librarians did the computer programming and designed the 
reading games. A big plus was the reduction in paperwork usually involved in keeping track of the 
participants. 



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AWARDS AND INCENTIVES] 



Games 

Games are a great way to stimulate interest in reading programs. One of the benefits of a reading game is that it 
attracts the average and poor readers, as well as the better readers, and everyone has an equal chance. If you are 
interested in finding out about Enoch Pratt's summer reading game, a report on it appears in the Spring 1986 
issue of Top of the News magazine. 

The important thing to remember is that a positive reinforcement of a love of reading is the main goal. 
Children’s librarians have long held as their foremost objectives those so well formulated by Harriet Long in 
her book Rich The Treasure: 

1. "To make a wide collection of books easily and temptingly available." 

2. "To give guidance to children in their choice of books and materials." 

3. "To share, extend, and cultivate the enjoyment of reading as a voluntary, individual pursuit." 

4. "To encourage lifelong education through the use of public library resources." 

5. "To help children develop their personal abilities and social understanding to the fullest." 

6. "To serve as a social force in the community together with the child's welfare." 



An Alternative View 

Opponents of reading programs feel that there is a tendency by parents, teachers or the children to make 
participation competitive. The child reading the largest number of books is the winner of the game. This 
emphasizes quantity over quality and discourages some children. Some librarians feel that no awards or 
prizes should be given, that the only reward should be the pleasure derived by the child. Some libraries 
award certificates to children who read the required number of books. The schools often cooperate by 
presenting these certificates at assemblies. This recognizes the child's effort and encourages other children 
to realize that reading can be a pleasurable experience. 

Also, the system of awarding prizes differs from one library to another. Some libraries reward children 
based on the number of books read, some on the number of pages read, and some even recognize simply 
the amount of time spent reading. In whatever way your library recognizes the children's participation, give 
some form of reward. 



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PARENTS/FAMILY INVOLVEMENT | 



"... Children who are not told stories and who are not read to will have few reasons for wanting to learn to 
read . " 

Gail E. Haley, 1971 Caldecott Medal acceptance speech. 

"... While enriching your child's world, don't overlook the fact that looking at books and being read to is one of 
the best preparations for learning to read oneself " 

Toni S. Gould, Home Guide to Early Reading. 

"...Do you read to the older children who can read for themselves? If you do not, you are depriving them of a 
pleasure they will remember all of their lives . " 

Charlotte Leonard, Tied Together. 



As librarians, we are well aware of the benefits of reading to children. We have heard the testimonials, read the 
research, made our own observations. We believe strongly in the practice, but we have the opportunity to read 
to the same children maybe once a week. School teachers can at least read aloud to the same children every 
day, but we all know that the greatest impact is made by the parents who read in the home. Use the Arizona 
Reads Program as an opportunity to encourage reading as a family activity. 

Get parents involved from the beginning of the summer reading program. 

Hold a kick-off event for the Arizona Reads Program involving parents and children. If possible, have the 
parents and children come to the same event, breaking into separate groups after a welcome and explanation of 
the Arizona Reads Program. 

During the parent component: 

• Invite a local reading specialist to give a brief presentation to the group. Colleges, universities or local 
school districts are all sources for speakers. The speaker should keep it short and realize that the audience 
is composed of parents, not educators or other specialists. 

• Parents not in the habit of reading aloud may be hesitant to make their first choices. Prepare a list of books 
you think are especially suited to the purpose. Draw attention to the list and, if possible, make enough 
copies to give away. 

• Booktalk your parents! Draw their attention to books for adults that will help them get started reading 
aloud or inspire them. The New Read-Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease is excellent. It contains lists of 
proven read-aloud winners. Describe or quote briefly from one or two titles. 

At the end of the parent component, bring groups back together and have someone read a story or chapter to the 
entire group. Prepare the reader with an enticing selection, but read it, do not perform it. While everyone enjoys 
a good storyteller, we want to convince parents that reading and listening together is a pleasurable experience 
within any family's reach. 

There is a rationale for stressing brevity in the parent's program. We want parents to find the program 
interesting and quick-moving, but we do not want to overwhelm them with the idea of reading as a family. If 
parents think they have to make radical overnight changes in the families routine, they may not even get started. 



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Parental Program Tips 

Have a guest book for parents to sign that includes addresses so that you can send invitations to future events or 
other information. 

Provide refreshments to foster an informal, social atmosphere. 

Create displays of books from reading lists so individuals can easily pick them up at the end of the program. 
Allow time at the end for browsing and socializing. 

Keep everyone involved during the length of the Arizona Reads Program. 

If you use contracts for a reading program, allow books or pages read by parents to count toward fulfillment of 
the contract. Parents could make a separate contract, if they prefer, but either contract should allow the books 
read to count for older children as well as Read-To-Me participants. 

Was the atmosphere enthusiastic at your kick-off event? If so, try a midsummer parent/child get together. You 
may want to have someone share a favorite book or excerpt and/or show a short film based on a children's 
book. Draw attention to any interesting new titles and be prepared to recommend more favorites. Allow 
families plenty of time to swap experiences and favorite titles as well as to browse. 

A biweekly or monthly read-aloud newsletter could be a feature. This can be as simple as a photocopied list of 
additional titles especially suited for reading aloud or a report of the children's activities in the Arizona Reads 
Program. Use your mailing list if funds permit or send a sheet home with the children. 

Have the last meeting of the Arizona Reads Program at a time when parents can attend and make it a big 
celebration. You may award certificates at this time. You can award special certificates for reading families or 
indicate on the child's certificate (with gummed stars or stickers) how many books were read aloud by a parent. 

Refer to the section A Word (or 2) for Parents, in the chapter on program structures. This section has many 
useful tips for parental involvement. You may wish to photocopy the tips and hand them out to parents when 
they register their children for the Reading Program. 



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PARENTS/FAMILY INVOLVEMENT 



SUGGESTED TITLES FOR USE BY PARENTS 



Babies Need Books. 

Classics to Read Aloud to Your Children. 

The New York Times Parent's Guide to the 
cl988) 

Best Books for Children 

A Parent's Guide to Children's Reading. 

The Read-Aloud Handbook. 

The RIF Guide to Heart: How to Develop a 
Love of Reading in Your Child. 

The World Treasury of Children's Literature. 



Dorothy Butler (Atheneum cl985) 
William F. Russell (Crown c.1984) 
Eden Ross Lipson (Times Books 

Nancy Larrick (Bantam cl 982) 

Jim Trelease (Penguin). 

Paul Copperman (Addison Wesley 
cl986) 

Edited by Clifton Fadiman (Little 
Brown cl985) 



PARENT / FAMILY PROGRAM ACTIVITIES 

The following suggestions may offer activities that are new to your community. Do not be shy in providing 
ways for parents and family members or children’s caregivers to use fresh ideas. 

• Use your program registration forms or a family designed guest book to develop a mailing list for 
announcements for future events. Offer refreshments during the browsing time at the end of a program. This 
makes the program more of a social occasion. 

• If you have a preschool read- together program for your pre-readers and their parents, put both the child's 
name and the parent's / caregiver's name on the participation certificate, or give each their own. After all, they 
earned it together. 

• Allow children to use materials read to them in reaching their goal, whether it is a contract, personal goal or 
library-set goal. 

• If your library is open in the evening, sponsor a father’s / male caregiver's night out at the library. Have 
children bring their fathers, grandfathers or significant male family caregiver to the library for a special 
storytime session, refreshments and book selection. Do not forget to mention the need for family read-aloud 
time. If the evening is a success, consider making it a regular event. 

• Periodically send an updated list of read-aloud titles home with the children. 



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•Keep displays of good family read-aloud books available on display throughout the program. 

• Develop a family reading display on the wall using butcher paper and construction paper. "Reading Is a 
Natural " lends itself to many possible themes. For example, an animal theme might use animal shapes for 
families to record their names and book titles. 

• Host a family spelling bee. Use regular words or have a theme that illustrates "Reading Is a Natural. 

• End your program with a celebration. Plan the program or event for a time when parents can attend. If you 
award certificates at this time, special recognition or certificates can be presented to reading families. 

In the Family Reading Program Activities Packet you will find more suggestions that may be shared with 
parents or adult family members. Reproduce the needed amount to share with families and grandparents in the 
community in order to stimulate good reading habits. You may want to include them in the packet of 
registration materials for the program or as handouts for the read-together session. 



ADULT PATRON INVOLVEMENT IN FAMILY READING 

Most of us think of family reading programs only in terms of children, usually those who are three to ten years 
old. Occasionally we make an effort to encourage preteens and teens, but seldom do we realize there is an 
entire category of patrons who may enjoy participation. Those patrons are the young adults and adults of the 
community. Consider the impact of such a program for your library. Family programs, senior citizens, nursing 
homes and retirement center residents, as examples, are groups who might be considered for family reading 
programs. 



FAMILY PROGRAMS 

Many children spend their time in a child care environment since the norm is for both parents to be employed 
or for the child to come from a single parent home. Regardless of the circumstances, every family has demands 
that consume a great deal of time. Some librarians have moved storytime to evening hours to better 
accommodate those families. Storytime has become Family Time! There are a few things you may want to 
consider offering family groups in a family reading program. 

Why not offer a FAMILY CERTIFICATE along with individual certificates? During Family Reading Program 
time each child must bring an adult and each adult must bring a child. Set aside a special week during the 
family program for special features for family involvement and attendance. Have special bulletin boards, 
reading material centers, read-aloud programs, and lapsit programs. Follow the lead of one offer contract 
programs such as “DADDY (OR MOM) WILL READ TO ME.” Grandparents or other caregiver adults 
sometime bring children to the library. They, too, may be interested in working toward a certificate or in 
becoming involved in a meaningful way. 



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SENIOR CITIZENS 

During the active working years, time is not always available to read the many books or periodicals an 
individual might want to read. Consider a special program for senior citizens using the family reading theme. A 
low-key public awareness program to the targeted seniors in your community, pointing out that a special family 
program is available, may bring in several new patrons. A simple letter to civic clubs, churches, senior 
residences, health care offices, area agencies on aging and senior citizens centers should help to spread the 
word. Your sincere interest will become known and the response may surprise you. 



NURSING HOMES AND RETIREMENT CENTERS 

Those who reside in nursing homes and retirement centers may be served by regional library centers, but the 
involvement of the local public library may prove to be popular. 

Program directors in these care facilities might appreciate having buttons, ribbons, bibliographies, bookmarks 
and other thematic program materials. The games and activities enjoyed by children may also be enjoyed by 
seniors who live in nursing homes and retirement centers. Program directors are always looking for new and 
interesting program materials. 

While we normally think of family reading programs in terms of children's activities, remember reading is for 
everyone. Children need encouragement, but what better encouragement is there than seeing adults in their lives 
and in their community who also enjoy reading. Make an attempt to include others in the community in your 
summer program. If you do not set age limits, you may have a wider variety of participants than you expected. 

Retirement homes / centers are a good place to look for volunteers. Many of these residents would enjoy 
reading aloud to children. They may also be interested in making flannel board characters or favors for your 
programs. 



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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN | 



Moving Across America Storytime & Clip Art 
For a mobile, or bulletin board display 

Make a storytime talking about transportation. The “wheels on the bus” is always a hit song 
as well as the “little red caboose”. Combine these songs with your favorite train bus and plane 
stories and talk about different ways that you could move across America from Sea to Shining 
Sea. 




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Celebrating America Clip Art 
Liberty Bell 





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Celebrating America Clip Art 
Eagle 




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Sea to Shining Sea Clip Art 
Flag 






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Read: From Sea to Shining Sea 
Preschool Clipart 
Robert B. Bookworm 



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Read: From Sea to Shining Sea 
Preschool Clipart 




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Hit The Trail With Books 



Expand your horizons with books 




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Down by the Sea 

(A Visit to Our Country's Shores) 

Preschool - Grade 1 

Display Idea - Decorate a Net 

Materials needed: Large fish net 

Sealife animals (patterns follow) 

Additional summer objects (optional) 

Sunglasses 

Plastic beach pail and shovel 
Sun hat 
Goggles 
Flippers, etc. 

Directions: 

1. Purchase a large fish net and hang it from the ceiling or on a blank wall. 

2. Reproduce the patterns that follow and give to the children to color and cut out. The children may wish to 
add a message to the animal, such as the title of a favorite book or what they like best about the library, the 
beach, summer, etc. 

3. Add the animals to the net. 

4. As optional decorations, you may wish to add other beach items, such as sunglasses, old bathing suits and 
sun hats to the net. 1 



1 Idea adapted by Louisa Aikin from Upstart 1999 Summer Activity Guide , p. 13. 





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Patterns For “Decorate A Net” 




Manatee 



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Patterns for “Decorate A Net” 





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Sea gull 



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Shark 



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Patterns for “Decorate A Net” 




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Display Idea - A School of Rainbow Fish 
(Inspired by The Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister) 



Materials needed: Paper (multiple colors) 

Scraps of colorful paper 

Glue sticks 

Shiny spangles 

Blue paper 

Green crepe paper 

Fish shape pattern (follows) 



Directions: 

1. Cover a large bulletin board with blue paper. Add green crepe paper streamers to the bottom of the board, 
to represent seaweed. 

2. Reproduce the fish shape pattern on different colors of paper. Give a fish shape to each child and ask them 
to decorate them, using torn scraps of construction paper and glue. 

3. When done, give the children some shiny spangles to add to their fish (like the fish in the story), 

4. Add the finished fish to the underwater bulletin board scene. 2 



2 Adapted by Louisa Aikin from Warren, Jean. Alphabet Theme-A-Saurus. Everett, WA: Warren Publishing 
House, Inc., 1991. 



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Fish Shape Pattern 
(For “A School of Rainbow Fish”) 




123 



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Three Silly Fishermen 
(A Story for Reader's Theater) 



Cast: Narrator 

Three silly fishermen 
A little girl 



The story: 
Narrator: 

Narrator: 

Narrator: 

Narrator: 



One fine summer day, five fishermen went fishing by the sea. 

Down to the ocean they ran — one, two, and three! 

(The three fishermen "run " to the ocean, as their numbers are called ) 

The first fisherman fished on the beach. 

(First fisherman "stands" on the sand and "casts" his/her line into the surf.) 

The second fisherman fished on the pier. 

(Second "fisherman "walks " to the end of the pier and "casts " his/her line into the ocean.) 

The third fisherman went way out to sea in a boat to fish. 

(Third fisherman "boards" a boat and heads for the ocean, then “casts” his/her line into the 
water.) 

Narrator: At the end of the morning, each fisherman had caught a nice fat fish. 

(Each fisherman holds up his/her "catch".) 

Narrator: And, soon they met on the beach, to show off their catch. 

First Fisherman: "What a fine supper we will have! ” 

Second Fisherman: "Let's go home and cook our fish! 

Third Fisherman: "Wait! First, we must count to see if we are all here. What if one of us fell into the ocean?" 
Narrator: So, the first fisherman began to count. 

First Fisherman: "One, two. I see two fishermen. Oh, No! One of us is missing! 

Second Fisherman: "Maybe you counted wrong! Let me try ... One, two. I see two fishermen, too! It is true! 

One of us is missing!" 

Third Fisherman: "Oh, no! Our poor friend! What shall we do without him?!" 

Narrator: And the three fishermen began to cry for their lost friend. 

(The fishermen hug each other and cry.) 

Narrator: Just then, along came a little girl. She was going fishing, too. 

Little Girl: (to the fishermen) "Why are you crying? Can I help you?" 



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First Fisherman: "We were ready to go home with our fish, when we found one of us is missing!" 

Second Fisherman: “We’re afraid he has drowned!" 

Third Fisherman: We even counted ourselves to make sure. Like this ... one, two. Now, there are only two 





of us!" 


Narrator: 


Well, right away this smart little girl saw the fisherman’s mistake. The silly fisherman had 
forgotten to count himself! 


Little Girl: 


(to the fishermen) "Will each of you give me your fish if I can find your lost friend?" 


Fishermen: 


(together) "Yes! Yes, we will!" 


Little Girl: 


“Then run into the water one at a time and I will count you.” 


Narrator: 


Well, the fishermen did as they were told. 

(Each fisherman "runs” into the ocean in turn.) 


Little Girl: 


(counting, as each enters the water) "One! Two! Three!" 


Fishermen: 


(together) "Hooray! Our lost friend has been found!" 


Narrator: 


And, as they promised, each fisherman gave the little girl his fish. Then, home 
they went. 

(Fishermen give the little girl a fish , then wave goodbye and ”walk ” home.) 


Narrator: 


They were very wet, and they had no fish for supper, but they were very happy to 
be all together again! 3 



3 Adapted by Louisa Aikin from Edwards, Roberta. Five Silly Fishermen. New York: Random House, 1989. 

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Sea to Shining Sea Storytime 



Have a "celebrating America Storytime" using books such as America the Beautiful by Katherine Lee Bates, or 
This Land is Your Land words and Music by Woddy Guthrie - Paintings by Kathy Jakobsen. 

Do a color song such as "Put a Little Color on You" by Hap Palmer on the CD, Can a Cherry Pie Wave Good- 
bye? " 

Yankee Doodle" is also a fun song to introduce. 

Make the Patriotic Star, Star Wand, or American Flag. 






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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN 



Going to the Beach Storytime 

Talk about how there are different areas of America and how they are different. Explain that there are two 
oceans on the coasts of America. Stories to use - Spot Goes to the Beach by Erick Hill, The Brass Rinz by 
Nancy Tafuri and Harry by the Sea by Gene Zion. 



Decorate with beach towels and beach balls. 
Song Raffi "Baby Baluga" 



Five Little Star Fish 



Five little star fish lying on the sand. 

The first one said, I really need a hand!" 

The second one said, ’’There are children every where!” 
The third one said, ’’But we don’t care!’’ 

The fourth one said, "There is still some time for fun!’’ 
The fifth one said, “I don’t like it in the sun!” 

Then up came the wave a splashed upon the shore, 
and the five little star fish were seen no more! 



Another Five Star Fish 



Five starfish on the ocean floor, 

One crawled away, then there were four. 

Four starfish floating in the sea, 

One fell asleep, then there were three 
Three starfish swimming in the ocean blue, 
One went to play, then there were two. 

Two starfish together basking in the sun. 

One was picked up by a child, then there was one. 
One lonely starfish lying on the beach. 

Up came a wave a swept it back to sea! 



Craft 

Make a beach! 

Supplies 

recycled styrofoam meat trays 
sand and small rocks 
shells 

magazine cut-outs of fish, boats etc. 
glue 

Directions 

1. Provide each participant with a styrofoam meat tray. 

2. Let participants glue sand on the tray like a beach. 

3. Participants may glue on pictures shells and rocks in any way they wish. 




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Patriotic Star 



Craft idea to use with toddlers and preschoolers when talking about symbols of America 



Su pplies 

recycled file folder 
white construction paper 
red construction paper strips 1/2” wide 
blue construction paper strips 1/2” wide 

Before children arrive 

1. Make a five pointed star pattern out of the recycled file folder. The star should be about 3-4” tall. 

2. Use the star pattern to trace and cut out enough white construction paper stars for each participant. 

3. Use an exacto knife or razor blade to cut sits in the stars as on diagram. 

4. Cut red and blue construction paper strips in lengths appropriate for weaving into the star. 

5. Show the children how to weave the red and blue strips through the white star slits. 




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Star Wand 

Here is another way to introduce colors and symbols representing America 

Su pplies 

red, white and blue 5 point stars cut out of construction paper 

drinking straws 

stapler 

glue 

glitter 

or glitter glue 

Optional very tiny thin wispy strips of blue, red and white paper to add to wands 

Directions 



1. Give each participant one of each red, white and blue stars. Let the children decorate the stars with glue and 
glitter or glitter glue, (glitter glue is safer and less messy with younger children). 

2. Help each child staple the stars to one end of a drinking straw. 

3. The wisps of colored paper may also be glued to the back of the stars creating a star burst effect. 



Have children form a line and march around the room with the wand to the tune of “Yankee Doodle” or other 
patriotic songs. 





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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN 



Easy Flag 



Supplies 

red construction paper cut in half to form rectangles 
white construction paper cut in narrow strips 

blue construction paper cut into small squares for the field of blue in the flag corner 
white stars made with a star shaped punch or sticky stars 
drinking straws or tongue depressors 



Directions 

1. Give each participant a red rectangle, a blue square, some white strips and stars. 

2. Show what the American flag looks like and briefly what each element means. 

3. Let children create their own American Rag. 

4. Straws or tongue depressors may be attached for the participants ease of carrying. 
Have a parade! 




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Dolphin Riddle 
(A draw-and-tell game) 

Materials needed: Dry erase board OR 

Large sheet of paper 
Markers 

This game uses riddles to help you draw the dolphin shape. A pattern follows for the completed animal. 

1. What waves all day but never says goodbye? 

The ocean. 

(Draw 1, top back and tail fin.) 

2. What is in the middle of a lake but never gets wet? 

An island. 

(Draw 2, eye.) 

3. What goes out into a lake but never gets wet? 

A dock. 

(Draw 3, bottom line of fish.) 

4. What is used to steer in the water, but never in the air? 

Fins. 

(Draw 4, bottom and tail fins.) 

5. What has scales but never weighs anything? 

Fish scales. 

(Draw 5, scales on fish.) 

6. What is a flower that you can write on? 

A lily pad. 

(Draw 6, circle for head.) 4 




4 Copyright 1997. Reproduced by permission of the publisher from Terrific Tales To Tell , by Valerie Marsh, Ft. Atkinson, 
WI: Alleyside Press, 1997. 



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Do you know that this (point to drawing) is a certain type of fish called a dolphin fish? Why do you think it is 
called a dolphin fish? Does it resemble the dolphins we see at a zoo? 



Here's a poem about dolphins: 



Dolphins 



D 


is for 


0 


is for 


L 


is for 


P 


is for 


H 


is for 


I 


is for 


N 


is for 


S 


is for 



these delightful animals, 
the ocean where they live, 
the love they give to all. 
their peeps- they're talkative, 
their hands -just friendly fins, 
the interest they receive, 
their nose - it feels like pigskin, 
their smiles — they never leave. 



Put them all together they spell DOLPHINS - 
the mammals that mean the most to me. 4 



4 Copyright 1997. Reproduced by permission of the publisher from Terrific Tales To Tell , by Valerie Marsh. Ft. Atkinson, 
WI: Alleyside Press, 1997. 



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4 

Copyright 1997. Reproduced by permission of the publisher from Terrific Tales To Tell, by Valerie Marsh. Ft. Atkinson, WI: 
Alleyside Press, 1997 81 

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The Gentle Manatee 
(Sung to "Down by the Station") 



Down by the waterway 
Early in the morning. 

See the gentle manatee 
Munching on some plants. 

See his tubelike body 
And his broad, flat tail. 

Swish swish, swish, swish, 

Off he goes. 

Poor gentle manatees, 

Their homes are really crowded; 
Too many boats, 

No place for them to play. 

See the gentle manatee 
Swimming in the sun. 

Let's help the manatees, 
Everyone! 



By Jean Warren 5 



I’m a Great Big Whale 
(Sung to "I'm a Little Teapot") 



I’m a great big whale, 

Watch me swim. 

Here is my blowhole, 

Here are my fins. 

See me flip my tall as down I go, 

Then up I come and "whoosh" I blow! 



(Hold arms wide apart.) 

(Palms together, make large wavy motions.) 
(Point to top of head.) 

(Hold arms out at sides.) 

(Palms, together, bring arms down toward floor.) 
(Palms, together, bring arms up toward ceiling, 
Puff loudly to make " whoosh " sound) 



By Elizabeth McKinnon 6 



5 The Gentle Manatee by Jean Warren, Totline Magazine© 1999, a division of Frank Schaffer Publications, 23740 
Hawthorne Blvd, Torrance, Ca 90505. 

6 Adapted by Louisa Aikin from Warren, Jean. Alphabet Theme -A-Saurus. Everett, WA: Warren Publishing House, 1991. 




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The Octopus 

(Sung to "Little White Duck") 



Directions: 

With four children, form an octopus by standing in the center and having the four children form a circle around 
you, facing out. Ask each child to hold out his or her arms, forming the eight arms of the octopus. Ask them to 
wave them up and down, as they ’’swim" in the ocean. 

There are eight tentacles 
Swimming in the ocean, 

Eight tentacles are making a commotion. 

Who could belong to so many feet? 

The octopus does and they help him eat. 

He has eight tentacles 
Swimming in the ocean, 

Swim, swim, swim. 

By Judy Hall 7 



She Waded in the Water 
(Sung to "Battle Hymn of the Republic") 



Directions: 

Ask the children to pretend to wade into the ocean, getting deeper into the water as the song continues. They 
may wish to pretend it’s getting harder and harder to move through the water, too. Clap hands, as directed, 
instead of singing. 

She waded in the water, 

And she got her feet all wet, 

She waded in the water, 

And she got her feet all wet, 

She waded in the water, 

And she got her feet all wet, 

But she didn't get her (clap, clap ) wet, (clap) yet. (clap) 

Chorus: 

Glory, glory, hallelujah! 

Glory, glory, hallelujah! 

Glory, glory, hallelujah! 

But she didn't get her (clap, clap) wet, (clap) yet. (clap) 



1 Adapted by Louisa Aikin from Warren, Jean. Alphabet Theme -A-Saurus. Everett, WA: Warren Publishing House, 1991. 




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She waded in the water. 

And she got her ankles wet. 

She waded in the water. 

And she got her ankles wet. 

She waded in the water 
And she got her ankles wet. 

But she didn't get her (clap, clap) wet, (clap) yet, (clap) 



(Chorus) 



She waded in the water. 

And she got her knees all wet. 

She waded in the water. 

And she got her knees all wet, 

She waded in the water 
And she got her knees all wet. 

But she didn't get her (clap, clap) wet, (clap) yet. (clap) 

(Chorus) 



She waded in the water. 

And she got her thighs all wet. 

She waded in the water. 

And she got her thighs all wet, 

She waded in the water 
And she got her thighs all wet. 

But she didn't get her (clap, clap) wet. (clap) yet. (clap) 



(Chorus) 



She waded in the water, 

And she finally got it wet, 

She waded in the water. 

And she finally, got it wet. 

She waded in the water 
And she finally got it wet. 

She finally got her bathing suit wet 8 



8 Adapted by Louisa Aikin from Schiller, Pam. Where is Thumbkinl Mt. Rainer, MD: Gryphon House, 1993. 






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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN 



Down By the Sea 
(Sung to "Down By the Bay") 



Use the patterns that follow, if desired, to make the song a flannel board. The song may be sung as a call and 
response, too. 

Down by the sea, 

Where our country ends; 

That's where I go 
With all my friends. 

And when I do. 

New Englanders will say, 

"Did you ever see a clam kicking through the sand?” 

Down by the sea! 



Down by the sea, 

Where our country ends; 

That’s where I go 
With all my friends. 

And when I do. 

Virginians will say. 

"Did you ever see a shad swimming with his dad?” 
Down by the sea! 

Down by, the sea, 

Where our country ends; 

That’s where I go 
With all my friends. 

And when I do, 

Floridians will say, 

"Did you see that manatee smiling back at me?" 
Down by the sea! 



Down by the sea, 

Where our country ends; 

That's where I go 
With all my friends. 

And when I do, 

Californians will say, 

"Did you ever see an otter floating with her daughter?” 
Down by the sea! 




ERIC 



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Down by the sea. 

Where our country ends; 

That's where I go 
With all my friends. 

And when I do, 

Alaskans will say, 

"Did you ever see a whale with a black and white tail?" 
Down by the sea! 



Down by the sea. 

Where our country ends; . 

That's where I go 
With all my friends. 

And when I do, 

Hawaiians will say, 

"Did you ever see a shark that's afraid of the dark?" 
Down by the sea ! 9 




9 Song by Louisa Aikin, Scottsdale Public Library System. 

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Patterns for “Down by the Sea” 





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Patterns for “Down By The Sea” 





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Patterns for “Down By the Sea” 





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Whoosh goes the wind 
Sniff- Sniff goes my nose. 
Crash go the waves. 
Splash-splash go my toes. 



I'll hunt for seashells, 

You sift the sand. 

Let's build a castle 
As high as we can! 

For lunch, we'll have crackers. 
Some juice, and a peach. 

Oh my. What fun 

Is this day on the beach! 10 



A Day at the Beach 
(A Fingerplay) 

(Sway arms back and forth) 
(Sniff) 

(Clap.) 

(Kick feet.) 



(Pretend to pick up shell.) 

(Pretend to sift sand) 

(Place one hand on top of the other- 
continue, going higher.) 



(Pretend to eat.) 



10 A Day at the Beach , By Jean Warren, Totline Magazine © 1999 , a division of Frank Schaffer Publications, 
23740 Hawthorne Boulevard, Torrance Ca 90505. 





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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN 



The Fish Who Wished He Could Fly 

(An activity story) 



Materials needed: Flying fish pattern (follows) 

Paper (multiple colors) 
Scissors 

Small paperclips 



Directions: 

1 . Reproduce flying fish pattern on paper. Give one to each child. 

2. Help the children cut out the fish shape. Have them cut a slit in the fish's tail and attach a small paperclip to 
its nose. 

3. As you read the story, let the children toss their flying fish shapes into the air and watch them spiral 
downward. 

Hint: Fold out the flaps on the fish’s tail for better twirling. 



There once was a fish 
Who swam all around. 
He liked to swim up. 

He liked to swim down. 


Up, up he went. 

He circled tip high. 
Spinning and soaring 
As though he could fly. 


He swam to the surface 
And pecked at the sky. 
He loved to watch 
All the birds flying by. 


Then down, down he went, 
He started to fall, 

Twirling and whirling. 
'Twas no fun at all! 


Oh, how he wished 
That he, too, could fly! 
What fun he would have 
Way up in the sky. 


At last, he splashed down 
To his home in the sea. 
This was the place 
He wanted to be. 


So he swam to the bottom. 
Then swam back up, fast. 
Out of the water 
He shot like a blast. 


Never again 

Did he wish he could fly. 
Swimming was best, 

And I'll tell you why— 




He's a fish “ 



By Jean Warren. 



11 The Fish Who Wished He Could Fly, Flying Fish , A Day at the Beach , The Gentle Manatee , by Jean Warren. 
Totline Magazine© 1999. A division of Frank Schaffer Publications, 23740 Hawthorne Blvd., Torrance, CA 
90505. 




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Flying Fish Pattern 




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Craft: Sunny Day Beach Sculptures 



Materials needed: Dough: 

3 cups salt 

1 3/4 cups water, divided 
1 1/3 cups cornstarch 

Plastic bag OR airtight container 
Found objects: 

Shells 

Bits of driftwood 
Small pebbles, etc. 



Directions: 

1. Ahead of time, mix a batch of dough, following the recipe below. 

2. Cover a table with a vinyl tablecloth and invite the children to make a sculpture at the table. 

3. The children may wish to make a beach scene by pressing small found objects into the dough. 

They may also wish to make a sandcastle sculpture and decorate it. 

4. Place the finished sculptures in a sunny spot to harden. They will harden in a day or two, depending on the 
amount of direct sunlight available. 

Hint: A spray bottle filled with water is handy for keeping the dough soft and pliable while children are 
working with it. 



Dough recipe: 

1. Combine salt and 1 cup water in a saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring often, until water evaporates, 
about 5 minutes. Remove from heat. 

2. Combine cornstarch and remaining water in a small bowl; stir until smooth. 

3. Add cornstarch mixture to salt mixture. Stir over low heat until thoroughly combined. Remove from heat. 

4. When dough is cool enough to handle, transfer to a sealed plastic bag or other airtight container. 12 



1 2 

Adapted by Louisa Aikin from "Sunny Day Sculptures ”, Totline, July- August, 1999, p.15. 



O 

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mL45 



Copy and cut out pattern for hat. Punch out holes. Tie a piece 
of string through both holes. Tie around child’s head. 



P6 








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Naacnmo lOOHOsaad hoj swvaooad 



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Milk Carton Boats 

Take a half pint milk carton and cut it in half from top to bottom. Glue a triangle piece of 
paper to a straw. Glue the straw to the middle of the inside of the milk carton. Decorate 
as they please. Have the kids race their boats after they make them. 




Milk Carton 



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Make a Quilt of America 



Supplies needed: 

Two photocopied maps of the United States (1 1 X 17) for each participant or a 
larger cardboard for the map. 



Scraps of cloth or colored paper or old wall paper books 



Scissors 



Glue 

Directions: 

1. Give each participant two copies of the United States map. (Children can cut up one map for "state 
patterns" to use with paper, cloth or wall-paper.) 

2. Let children cut out the shapes of the states from colored paper, cloth or wallpaper. Participants can then 
glue the shapes on to the map, creating an American Quilt. 

Storvtime 

Could be centered around quilt stories, travel, or multicultural themes. 



Supplies Needed: 

For each participant: 

• 26 tooth picks (buy colored ones for the fourth of July if possible) If not use red marker to color 
14 of the toothpicks red. 

• White Glue 

• Plastic lids for drying the magnets 

• Blue paper cut into 1 inch squares 

• Sticky stars or glitter 

• Magnetic strips 

Directions: 

1. Each participant should color 14 toothpicks red if red toothpicks are not available. 

2. Line (on a plastic lid) up two red toothpicks, then two natural, side by side. Continue 2 red, 2 natural. 

Should end up with 7 red "stripes" and 6 natural "stripes - beginning and ending with red. 

3. Cover toothpicks with a thin layer of white glue. 

4. Place the blue square in the upper left-hand corner of the "flag". 

5. Put stars or glitter onto the blue square. This is a good time to do stories to go with the project! 

6. Peel flag off of plastic lid when it has completely dried. 

7. Glue the magnetic strip to the back of the Flag. Enjoy! 



Flag Magnet 



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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN] 



Floor Map 



Su pplies 

large piece of cardboard (refrigerator box etc.) 

Markers 

Knife 

Directions 



1. Draw the shape of the United States on large cardboard with black marker. 

2. Using markers color and lable the states and famous landmarks. 

3. Using a utility knife cut out the states. This may be kept in the children’s area or brought out for storytime as a 
group activity to put the United States back together. 



**Smaller versions to take home could be made by children out of cereal boxes. 




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ERIC 



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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN | 




Recipe: Gelatin Ocean 



Materials needed: Blue gelatin 



Gummy candies (fish, sharks, dolphins, etc.) 

Cookies (vanilla wafers OR chocolate wafers) — Optional 
Clear plastic cups 



Directions: 

1. Prepare blue gelatin according to the package directions. 

2. Pour the gelatin into the plastic cups. 

3. When the gelatin is almost set, insert the gummy candy creatures. Serve when completely set. 

4. As an optional step, crush cookies in a plastic bag or food processor to make the "sand" for the ocean 
bottom. Pour a thin layer of crumbs into the bottom of the cup, then slowly fill with gelatin. 

Note: If the gelatin is allowed to sit too long, the acidity will start to break down the candy fish 13 





13 



Adapted by Louisa Aikin from Upstart 1999 Summer Activity Guide , PP. 17-18. 



READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN | 



"Reading: from Sea to Shining Sea 
Preschool Activities 
C. J. Brown, Library Assistant II 
Mohave County Library District 

Background 

To set the stage for the Preschool activities, we will be going on an imaginary trip across the United States. 
Starting with the Northeast during the Colonial period and working our way to the post-Civil War South, the 
farmlands of the Midwest, the cowboy West, the West Coast and finally to Alaska and Hawaii. 



I have included 3 possible frameworks for the story sessions in my activities and bibliography selections: 

1 . Using the magic photo album from Pig, Pig and the Magic Photo 
Album and "traveling" to different parts of the country. 

2. Using quilts as a unifying theme while telling stories that show how our 
country is "Patched together" from many different kinds of people. 

3. Using a general patriotic theme focusing on the different geographic areas 

The format I use in my Storytimes for 3-5 year-olds is: 

Gathering song (something that is repeated each session) 

Long story 
Shorter story 
Large muscle exercises 
Short story 

"Special" story (using puppets, flannel board characters, audience 
participation, etc.) 

Coloring page or take-home craft 

Finger plays or stretches are used as needed for wiggles 



Preschoolers need predictability and like to have their story hour start and end the same way every time. You 
might want to start each pre-school session with the song "The Wheels on the Bus " by Raffi or another " travel " 
song. This will set the stage for the children and will help them get ready to listen. If you start with a song you 
can use a poem to end each session-something that lets them know story hour is over and it's time to go home. 
I end each session by saying: "We listened to stories. We sat with our friends, Now we are finished and this is 
The End". 



Spend extra time your first session going over the gathering song and your ending ritual. Repeat the 
words of the song for the children and show them any motions you want them to use. You can also 
introduce them to a large map of the U.S. 



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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN | 



The Northeast 
Colonial America 

When most people think of traveling "back East" they think of visiting the places where our country had it's 
beginning. Traditional folk tales or tall tales will be perfect for this visit. 

Method: Using the format you have used for introducing other parts of the program, tell the children you will 
be going on a trip to the Northeastern part of the country. 

Show pictures of colonial Williamsburgh or other early settlements Explain that people in the pictures are not 
wearing costumes-they really wore clothing like that pictured. 

You should also explain that in colonial times there were no televisions or movies and that people told stories 
to entertain themselves. 



Way Down South 
Jazz Band 

What do you think of when you think of Dixie? Why a Dixieland band, of course. Making your own 
instruments and then marching in a band can be a lot of fun. (If you think the band will be too noisy for your 
library, march around the outside of the building.) 

Method: 

Using the format you have used for introducing other parts of the program, begin your visit to the South by 
showing pictures of the Everglades, New Orleans, and whatever other parts of the South you might want to 
"visit". 

You might want to adopt a Southern drawl while you read the stories. 



The Midwest 
Farm Country 

When we think of the Midwest we tend to think of farm country. Stories about farms, the traditional tales of the 
Little Red Hen and the Three Little Pigs , as well as books about baby animal’s work well for this area. I have 
included several activities involving quilts and making quilt squares, which will also be very appropriate for 
any US region, but seem particularly appropriate for the Midwest. 

Method: Using the format you have used for introducing other parts of the program, tell the children you will 
be going on a trip to the middle part of the country. Decorate the room with pictures of farms and farm animals, 
rolling plains, and amber waves of grain. 

"Old MacDonald had a farm" seems like a natural activity song for this section. Photocopy pictures from a 
coloring book and blow them up or download the animal masks from "The Hat" from Jan Brett's web page 
(http:www.janbrett.com/hat animal masks main.htm). Add a tongue depressor or paint stick to the back and use 
the masks to sing the song. 



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The West 



Cowboy Country 



Despite the fact that we live in the West, our children sometimes know very little about western culture. 
Cowboy stories, stories about wagon trains, Native American stories from the Hopi, Navajo, Ute and other 
Native cultures can be adapted to use for children. Try to use photographs of actual cowboys at work and of 
Native peoples. Old copies of "Arizona Highways" is an excellent source of pictures and information. Any of 
the activities from the 1999 "Read Arizona" Manual are also appropriate. 

Method: 

Using the format you have used for introducing other parts of the program, say that we won't have to travel far. 
Decorate with cactus (sure to spark a lively discussion with the children) and interesting rocks. Wear your jeans 
or square-dance skirt. 

Stories about coyotes, jackrabbits, roadrunners, quail, etc. are lots of fun to use because the children are 
familiar with them and usually have interesting anecdotes that they love to share. 



A pretend trip to the ocean can be lots of fun. Have the children wear their swimsuits and do "ocean" activities. 

Method: 

Using the format you have used for introducing other parts of the program, say that we are going to the ocean. 
Comment on the colors of their swimsuits, remind them of the importance of wearing sunscreen, and have them 
don their pretend sunglasses. 

I use a large plastic dishpan, which I fill with sand and small shells. When placed in the middle of a dropcloth 
on the floor, the mess is kept to a minimum. The children love running their hands through the sand and 
discovering the shells. We talk about the color of the shells, the coolness of the sand, etc. If you feel really 
adventurous and have access to an area outside, you can fill a small wading pool with damp sand and let the 
children make sand sculptures. Save the sand-play till after the stories, as it is hard to recapture the children’s 
attention once they start playing in the sand. 



The last states to join the Union, Alaska and Hawaii, offer an exotic touch to the story sessions. If you think 
that trying to cover Alaska and Hawaii together will be confusing to the children, do a separate session for each 
state. Be sure to show the children their location on a map or globe of the world. Though young children will 
have a difficult time grasping the meaning of the map, it makes them feel important to know that you have 
shared this grown-up information. 



Using the format you have used for introducing other parts of the program, tell the children that we are going 
on a pretend airplane ride to some states that are far away. Have them board a pretend airplane, or turn each 
child into a plane with their arms held out as the wings. Help the children visualize looking out the windows of 
the plane and seeing clouds or water. You can see whales or seals in the water below as well as palm trees on 
the islands and any other flora or faunas you want to imagine... 

You might want to include a discussion of life in a hot place versus life in a cold place. Pretending to get 
dressed in warm clothing to play in the snow is always a popular activity. Many party shops have grass skirts if 
you want to try the hula. (Playing with hula-hoops can also be fun!) 



The West Coast 



Alaska and Hawaii 



Method: 



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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN 



Read: from Sea to Shining Sea 
Preschool Activity 
C. J. Brown 

Mohave County Library District 
Quilt Designs 



Materials: 

One piece construction paper for each child 

Pieces of construction paper cut in geometric shapes 

Gluesticks 

Scissors 

Prepare geometric shapes in advance 

1 . Show children examples of quilt blocks either from a real quilt or from a book such as The quilt-block history of 
pioneer davs. 

2. Give each child a piece of construction paper to use as a background. 

3. Let children pick their own colors and designs and make a paper “quilt block”. Have them lay out their design 
before they start to glue the pieces in place. 

4. If desired, you can staple the finished blocks to a bulletin board “crazy quilt” style. 




102 

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| READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHn.DREfTI 

Reading: From Sea to Shining Sea 
Preschool Activity 
C. J. Brown 

Mohave County Library District 



Quilt Designs 




I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN I 



“Read: from Sea to Shining Sea” 
Preschool Activity 
C. J. Brown 

Mohave County Library District 



Pretend Fireworks 



Materials 

Tissue roll for each child 

Strips of crepe paper or ribbon for each child 

Construction paper in red, white, and blue 

Crayons or markers 

Star stickers or glitter (optional) 

White glue 

Gluesticks 

Scissors 

1. Cut a piece of construction paper 
4 1/2" x 6" for each child. Each child will 
also need several pieces of crepe paper or 
ribbon approximately 1/2” x 10”. 



2. Have the children decorate the 
paper as desired. 




3. 



When they have decorated their paper, 
have the children turn the paper over so 
that the decorations are on the underside. 



4. Have the children lay the decorated 
paper on the table with the short edge 
towards them. Use the gluesticks to cover 
the back of the paper. 

5. Have the children lay the tissue roll on top 
of the glued paper and roll it up in the 
decorated paper. 



6. Glue the ribbon or crepe paper inside one 
end of the tissue roll. 



7. Children can shake or swirl their “fireworks” 
as you play music and march in your 4th of 
July parade. 









I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL rHn DREN~l 



Read: From Sea to Shining Sea 
Preschool Activity 
C. J. Brown 

Mohave County Library District 



Patriotic Headbands 



Materials 

Construction paper in red white and blue 

Drinking straws cut in 4" pieces 

One strip of construction paper 2" x for each child 

Gluesticks 

Scissors 

Stapler or tape 



Precut the stars using the templates 
provided. You will need one star of each 
color and each size for each child. 




3. 



4. 



Give each child three straw pieces, three 
large stars and three small stars. 



Show the children how to rub the 
gluestick all over the back of the 
a small star and then make a “star 
sandwich” with the end of a straw piece 
between the small star and one of the 
large stars. (Depending on the strength 
of your glue, you may need to staple 
the pieces together.) Repeat for all three 
straws. 



Use the tape or stapler to attach the 
other end of each star to the strip of 
construction paper. 




5. Fit the headband around the child’s 
head and staple or tape to fit. 



O 

ERJC 



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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN | 



“Read: From Sea to Shining Sea 
Preschool Activity 
C. J. Brown 

Mohave County Library District 



Car Litter Bags 



Materials 

Small paper lunch bag for each child 

Strip of poster board or other light cardboard 1” x 16" 

(You may wish to pre-fold the cardboard to fit inside the top 
of the lunch bag) 

12" of cord or heavy string 
Glue 

Hole punch 

Scraps of construction paper, stickers, 
rubber stamps, etc. to decorate the bags 



1. Give each child a lunch bag. 

2. Let the children decorate their bags 
as they wish using scraps of 
construction paper, stickers, etc. 




3. 



Have the children open their bags 
and place the bag on the table 
with the opening toward them. Run a 
line of glue inside the open bag about 
1/2" from the top of the bag. Have 
the children place the piece of poster 
board inside the top of the bag 
against the glue. The piece of poster 
board will hold the litter bag open in 
the car. 



4. Punch 2 holes about 3" apart on one 
side of the bag. Thread the cord 
through the holes and tie the ends 
together in an overhand knot. 






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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN I 




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“Read: From Sea to Shining Sea 
Preschool Activity 
C. J. Brown 

Mohave County. Library District 

Whoopee Pinwheels (M, W) 

(You will need some “helping hands'’ for this 
project-ask mothers or volunteers to help!) 



Materials 

Construction paper 

Scissors (safety scissors if the children will be cutting) 
Pencil 

Crayons or markers 
1 unsharpened pencil-per pinwheel 
1 large-headed pin-per pinwheel 
1 pony bead-per pinwheel 



1. Using pattern provided, duplicate one pinwheel for each child 
Outer edges can be cut in advance using 
a paper cutter. Cut one pinwheel for each child. 

2 Allow the children to color their pinwheels. 

3. Cut four lines toward the center where indicated on 
each pinwheel. (For very young children an adult 
will need to do the cutting; older children can 

cut the lines themselves with supervision) 

4. From contrasting paper cut a circle for each child 





5. Assemble the pinwheels (see diagram) 



The children can blow gently on the pinwheel to make it turn. Or, if it is a breezy day, 
take the pinwheels outside to see how the wind makes them move. 



o 





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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN | 





“Reading: From Sea to Shining Sea” 
Preschool Activity 
C. J. Brown 

Mohave County Library District 



Whoopee Pinwheels 



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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN I 



“Read: From Sea to Shining Sea 
Preschool Activity 
By C. J. Brown 

Mohave County Library District 



Sand Painting (w) 

Sand painting is a traditional Native American Art. 
Paintings are used in healing ceremonies and are 
traditionally worked from dawn to sunset 
or sunset to dawn and are then destroyed. 



Materials 

Clean sand or white commeal 
Powdered poster paint 
Poster board or light cardboard 
White glue (thin slightly with water) 



Pencil 

Cotton swabs or small brushes 

Small containers for colored sand 

Small trays or box lids to catch loose sand 



Prepare colored sand in advance by mixing approximately 1 C sand with 2 T powdered paint in a tightly closed jar. 



1. Draw a simple line drawing similar to those in 
the example. Try to keep shapes large. 

2 Fill a small area of the picture with thinned glue, 
using the swabs or paintbrush. Use fingers to 
sprinkle sand on the glued area. 

3. Allow glue to dry for a few moments before shaking off excess sand. 

4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until the picture is covered. 

if desired, you may cover the background with uncolored sand. 







m 



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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN I 



Read: From Sea to Shining Sea 
Preschool Activity 
By C. J. Brown 

Mohave County Library District 



Ojo de Dios (W) 



Materials 

Two sticks the same length (you can use pencils or 

icecream sticks) 

Yarn in various colors (easier to handle if it is rolled 

in small balls) 

White glue 

1. Cross the sticks in the center to for a +. Glue 
them where they cross to make it easier for the 
children to handle them. 

2 Begin wrapping the sticks in a figure 8, then without 
tying off the yarn, and going clockwise , wrap the 
long end of the yam under #1, around the stick, under 
#2, around that stick, under #3, etc. 

3. Continue wrapping the yarn around each leg of the 
cross. Keep the yarn tight and push it toward the 
center with each wrap so that the strands will lie 
close together. 

4. Change colors whenever you desire. When ending a 
color, tie a double knot close to the stick, put a drop 
of glue over the knot and trim off the end of the yam. 

5. When your “god’s eye” is full, tie and glue the yam 
a described above, and then form a hanging loop 
and tie and glue again. Trim off the end of the yarn. 






Ill 



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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN I 



“Read: From Sea to Shining Sea 
Preschool Activity 
By C. J. Brown 

Mohave County Library District 

Flower Leis (H) 

Leis are presented on many occasions. 

The gift of a lei can mean “love”, 
“friendship”, “welcome” or “goodbye”. 



Materials 

Construction Paper cut in 2" squares (Pastel colors & white) 

Drinking straws cut in 1” pieces 
String or yam (1 yard for each child) 

White glue or masking tape 
Hole Punch 

Prepare string in advance by dipping about 1" of each end in white glue 
and allowing it to dry OR wrap each end with masking tape. This will give 
the children a firm end to hold and will make stringing the leis easier. 



1. Fold each 2" square of construction 
paper in fourths and cut as illustrated 
to form petals. 

Flowers may also be formed by 
tearing the petal shapes. 

2 Punch a hole in the center of each flower 

3. Alternating flowers and straw pieces, 
string your lei. It is easiest to start at 
the center and work toward each end. 

4. When the string is covered to within 
3" of each end, tie the ends together in 
a knot. 




It is traditional when presenting the lei to someone else to give a kiss 
on the cheek. 




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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN I 



“Read: From Sea to Shining Sea 
Preschool Activity 
C. J. Brown 

Mohave County Library District 

Windchimes 

(Use as part of the Dixieland Band or just for fun.) 

[For young children, you may wish to do steps 1-5 beforehand.] 



Materials 

Large soft-plastic lid (such as a 
coffee can lid) 

Scrap paper 
Pen or magic marker 
Paper punch 



Scissors 

8-10 pony or other large beads 
String 

Large nails or old keys 



1. Trace around the outside of the lid on a piece 
of scrap paper. Cut out the traced circle. Fold 
the circle in half with the edges matching. Fold 
it in half again, to make a wedge-shape. 

2. Unfold the piece of paper and place it on top of 
the plastic lid. Mark the lid about 1/2" inch in 
from the edge, where each folded line falls. 

3. Punch a hole at each mark. 

4. Cut two 24" pieces of string. Thread the string 
down through one hole and up through the 
opposite hole. Repeat this so that the underside 
of the lid has an “X” made of string. Pull the 
string end even and make an overhand knot. 

5. Mark 8-10 holes about 1/2" in from the edge 
all around the lid. 

6. Cut 8-10 strings each 9"-12" long and tie a large 
nail or key to one end of each string. 

7. Thread the ends of the strings through the 
holes around the edge of the lid. Tie each 
string through a pony bead to hold it in place. 





Hang the windchime in a window or tree and listen to the music the wind makes. If you want to use the windchime as 
an instrument in the band, use another large nail or an unsharpened pencil to strike the hanging nails. 




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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN I 



“Read: From Sea to Shining Sea 
Preschool Activity 
By C. J. Brown 

Mohave County Library District 



Drums 

[Use as part of the Dixieland Band or as Native American Drums] 



Materials 

Oatmeal Box or other large can 

2 pieces Rubber inner-tube, soft vinyl or large balloons 

Heavy rubber bands 

Construction paper 

Paint, stickers or glitter (optional) 

2 Unsharpened pencils 
2 corks or large wooden beads 



I. Stick the ends of the unsharpened pencils 
Into the corks or large wooden beads. 
Glue in place for drumsticks. Place aside 
to allow glue to dry. 



2 Remove the top and bottom from the 
oatmeal box or can. 




3. 



Cut the rubber about 2" larger all around 
than the diameter of the can. 



4. Color and or decorate the construction paper. 

Wrap it around the sides of the can, cutting 
off any excess paper. Glue the paper to the can. 

Use the rubber bands to hold the paper till the glue dries. 

5. (This step usually takes two people.) 

Stretch the inner tube or vinyl over one 
end of the can. Use a heavy rubber band 
to hold it in place. Repeat for the other end. 







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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHIT DREN~! 



“Read: from Sea to Shining Sea 
Preschool Activity 
By C. J. Brown 

Mohave County Library District 



Rubber Band Banjo 



Materials 

Shoe Box 

3 or 4 heavy rubber bands 

Pencil or pen 

Scissors 

2" x 3" piece of cardboard folded in half 



1 . Draw a circle in the center of the box lid. 

2. Cut out the circle (Adult may need to do this step). 




3. Put the cover back on the box. 

4. Wrap the rubber bands around the box so that they go across the hole. 

5. Put the folded piece of cardboard under the rubber bands as a bridge next 
to the hole. 

6. Strum the rubber bands with your fingertips. 




Kazoo 




Materials 

Toilet tissue core 
Tissue paper 
Rubber band 
Scissors 

Stickers , glitter and glue or other trim 

1. Cut a piece of tissue 3" square. 

2. Put the cut tissue over the end of the tissue 
roll and hold in place with a rubber band. 

3. Decorate the tissue roll as desired. 



To play the Kazoo, 
place end of tissue 
roll to lips and hum or 
sing softly. The tissue 
picks up and amplifies 
the vibrations from 
your lips. 



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ERIC 



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PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN I 



Cultural Party 

Have a party where people sign up to bring food, games etc. from different countries. Also, 
read several stories or legends from different countries. Have the participants talk about 
what they brought in and the significance to the country. 




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| READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN] 

Down by the Sea 
(A Visit to our Country's Shores) 

Preschool - Grade 1 

Bibliography 



The following books are recommended: 

Adams- Georgie. Fish Fish Fish. New York: Dial. 1993. 
o.p. 

Colorful collage illustrations introduce various sizes and shapes of fish. 

Aliki. Those Summers. New York: Harper Collins, 1996. 

ISBN 0060249374 $14.95 

A little girl remembers summers at the seashore where children swim, romp on the beach, collect shells, build 
sandcastles, and enjoy other fun-filled activities. 

Allen, Judy. Whale. Cambridge, Mass.: Candlewick, 1992. 

ISBN 1564021602 $15.95 

One night a young girl and her parents witness the seemingly magical rescue of a mother whale and her baby 
that are exhausted from trying to outswim a spreading oil slick. Includes a whale fact sheet. 

Andes, Katherine. Fish Story. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993. 

ISBN 0671792709 $15.00 

When he encounters a very large fish that agrees to grant him a wish, Craig invites him home to meet his 
family. 

Berger, Barbara. A Lot Of Otters. New York: Philomel, 1997. 

ISBN 0399229108 $16.99 

As a lot of otters wrestle, roll, and cavort on the water, they make such a commotion of light that Mother Moon 
finds her lost child. 

Bishop, Gavin. Little Rabbit and the Sea. New York: North-South, 1997. 

ISBN 1558588094 $15.95 

Having heard about the sea and longed to see what it is like. Little Rabbit receives an unexpected gift from a 
seagull. 

Borovsky, Paul. The Fish that Wasn't. New York: Hyperion, 1994. 
o.p. 

A little girl learns that every creature has its own place, when she gets a strange gray fish for her birthday. 



170 

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Bowden, Joan Chase. Why the Tides Ebb and Flow. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1979. 

ISBN 0395283787 $16.00 

In this folktale explaining why the sea has tides, an old woman threatens to pull the rock from the hole in the 
ocean floor if Sky Spirit does not honor his promise to give her shelter. 

Bush, John. The Fish Who Could Wish. Brooklyn, NY: Kane/Miller, 1991. 

ISBN 0916291359 $13.95 

A fish’s wishes come true until the day he makes a foolish wish. 

Bush, Timothy. Three at Sea. New York: Crown, 1994. 

ISBN 0517592991 $14.00 

When three boys accidentally float downriver and out to sea on an inner tube, they look for help from several 
endangered animals. 

Carlstrom, Nancy White. Swim the Silver Sea, Joshie Otter. New York: Philomel, 1993. 

ISBN 0698 114477 $5.95 

Because none of the other animals will play with him, Joshie the sea otter swims too far out to sea, but he is 
called back by a song sung in the strong safe voice of his mother. 

Chandrasekhar, Aruna. Oliver and the Oil Spill. Kansas City, Missouri: Landmark Editions. 1991. 

ISBN 09338493318 $14.95 

Young Oliver and his mother are among a group of sea otters rescued from an oil spill. 

Chapin, Tom. Sing a Whale Song. New York: Random House, 1993. 
o.p. 

Timothy loves the sea more than anything else. After magically turning into a whale he learns that the sea 
is becoming polluted and is given a song to sing to help others understand about pollution. 

Clements, Andrew. Big Al. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1988. 

ISBN 0887080758 $16.00 

A big, ugly fish has trouble making the friends he longs for because of his appearance — until the day his scary 
appearance saves them all from a fisherman's net. 

Cocca-Leffler, Maryann. Clams All Year. Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills, 1996. 

ISBN 0606132775 $11.19 

A large, extended family spends summers together at the seashore and encounters a memorable bumper crop of 
clams. 

Cohen, Caron Lee. How Many Fish? New York: Harper Collins, 1998. 

ISBN 0060277130 $12.95 

A school of fish and a group of children frolic in the bay. 



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Cole, Joanna. Hungry , Hungry Sharks. New York: Random, 1986. 

ISBN 0394974719 $11.99 

A simple discussion of the kinds of sharks and their behavior. 

Cole, Joanna. The Magic School Bus on the Ocean Floor. New York: Scholastic, 1992. 

ISBN 05904143105 $15.95 

On another special field trip on the magic school bus. Ms. Frizzle's class learns about the ocean and the 
different creatures that live there. 

Craig, Janet. What’s Under the Ocean. New York: Troll Associates, 1992. 

ISBN 0893756539 $3.50 

Brief text and pictures introduce some animals and plants that live in the ocean. 

Crespoe. George. How the Sea Began: A Taino Myth. New York: Clarion, 1993. 
o.p. 

The gourd containing the bow and arrow of the great departed hunter Yayael produces a torrent of water that 
becomes the world's ocean. 

Del Prado, Dana. Terror Below! True Shark Stories. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1997. 

ISBN 06142881 18 $13.99 

Presents facts and true stories about sharks and discusses both the good and the bad things they do. 

DeSaix, Frank. The Girl who Danced with Dolphins. New York: Farrar, Strauss & Giroux, 1991. 

ISBN 0374326266 $14.95 

After a dolphin saves her from a shark during a snorkeling expedition; Adrianne dreams of swimming 
underwater, surfacing, and pirouetting in the air like a dolphin. 

Ehlert. Lois. Fish Eyes: A Book You Can Count On. San Diego, Harcourt, Brace. Jovanovich 1990. 

ISBN 0152280510 $6.00 

A counting book depicting the colorful fish a child might see if he turned into a fish himself. 

Enderle, Judith A. Six Sandy Sheep. Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills, 1997. 

ISBN 1563975823 $14.95 

Six sheep are at the beach in this counting down book. 

Farris. Diane. In Dolphin Time. New York: Four Winds, 1994. 
o.p. 

A boy carries two dolphins home from the beach in his pocket, keeps them in his bathtub for a while, and finds 
that they make the ordinary wonderful and the wonderful ordinary. 

Florian, Douglas. A Beach Day. New York: Greenwillow, 1990. 
o.p. 

Describes simply how one family enjoys a day at the beach. Includes a list of seashells for which to look. 




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Foreman, Michael. One World. New York: Arcade, 1991. 
o.p. 



Two children playing at the beach tamper with the natural balance of a tide pool and, after destroying its 
beauty, realize how similar its microcosm is to their own world. 

Foreman, Michael. Seal Surfer. San Diego: Harcourt Brace, 1996. 



ISBN 0152013997 



$16.00 



Although he is on crutches, a boy goes to the beach with his grandfather, where they watch a seal being bom, 
and over the following seasons, the boy and the seal develop a special bond. 

Friend, Catherine. The Sawfin Stickleback: A Very Fishy Story. New York: Hyperion, 1994. 



People still talk about the time Katie and her little brother Mark almost caught the gigantic Sawfin Stickleback 
while ice fishing with their grandfather. 

Garland, Sherry. Summer Sandy. San Diego: Harcourt Brace, 1995. 



After a winter storm destroys the sand dunes that provide a home for plants and animals, a beach community 
bands together to restore the dunes. 

Gomi, Taro. Where's The Fish? New York: William Morrow, 1986. 
o.p. 

The reader is invited to find the fish in pictures where it is well camouflaged. 

Greenway, Frank. Tide Pool. New York: Dorling Kindersley, 1992. 

ISBN 1564581314 $9.95 

Discusses the different kinds of plants and animals that can be found in tide pools and how they interact with 
each other. 

Hall, Derek. Otter Swims. New York: Knopf, 1984. 
o.p. 

With his mother's help, a young otter overcomes his fear of the water and discovers the pleasures of swimming. 

Hest, Amy. Rosie's Fishing Trip. Cambridge, Mass.: Candlewick, 1994 
ISBN 156402296X $13.95 

Grandpa and Rosie spend the morning fishing and Rosie learns that catching a fish is not the most important 
thing. 

Heyduck-Huth, Hilde. The Starfish: A Treasure Chest Story. New York: Margaret K. McElderry, 1987. 
o.p. 

A starfish passes through many hands before a little girl finds it and puts it in her treasure chest. 



ISBN 1562824732 



$13.45 



ISBN 0152824928 



$15.00 




IREAD: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN] 

Hofmeyr, Dianne. Do the Whales Still Sing? New York: Dial, 1995. 
o.p. 

And old man tells the lighthouse boy about a successful sea captain who made his fortune hunting whales. 

Jenkin-Pearce, Susie. The Seashell Song. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1992. 
o.p. 

Listening to a seashell, a child learns about the wonders of the sea. 

Johnston, Tony. Whale Song. New York: Putnam. 1987. 

ISBN 03992 1402X $14.95 

Counting as they sing, whales use their mighty voices to pass on to one another the numbers from one to ten. 

Kalan, Robert. Moving Day. New York: Greenwillow, 1996. 

ISBN 06881319493 $14.93 

A hermit crab looking for a new home tries several different shells before finding one that fits just right. 

Kidd, Richard. Monsieur Thermidor: A Fantastic Fishy Tale. Woodbridge, CT: Blackbirch, 1998. 

ISBN 1567118003 $15.95 

Chef Henry finds that he cannot cook the lobster he was planning to make into soup, and as a gesture of thanks 
the lobster gives Henry the recipe for his famous seaweed soup. 

Kimmel, Eric A. Billy Lazroe and the King Of The Sea: A Tale of the Northwest. San Diego: Harcourt Brace & 
Co.,. 1996. 

ISBN 0152001085 $16.00 

Billy Lazroe, a sailor from Oregon, jumps into the ocean at the command of Davy Jones and falls in love with 
one of Davy's daughters. 

Krudop, Walter. Blue Claws. New York: Atheneum, 1993. 
o.p. 

A young boy gets to know his grandfather better when the two of them spend the day together crabbing. 

Le Tord, Bijou. Joseph and Nellie. New York: Bradbury, 1986. 
o.p. 

Joseph and Nellie get up at dawn and spend their day fishing at sea. 

Lingemann, Linda. Beluga Passage. Norwalk, CT: Soundprints, 1996. 

ISBN 1568993145 $15.95 

Beluga, her mother, and their pod of white whales face many dangers while migrating from the freezing Arctic 
Ocean to the warmer waters of the Bering Sea. 

Lionni, Leo. Swimmy. New York: Knopf, 1991. 

ISBN 0394917138 $18.99 

A little black fish in a school of red fish figures out a way of protecting them all from their natural enemies. 



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London, Jonathan. Old Salt, Young Salt. New York: Lothrop, Lee and Shepard. 1996. 

ISBN 0688129757 $16.00 

Aaron's dad is an experienced sailor, and Aaron must find his sea legs when they go out together for a day of 
fishing on the bay. 

MacCarthy, Patricia. Ocean Parade: A Counting Book. New York: Dial, 1990. 
o.p. 

An array of colorful fish of different shapes and sizes introduces the numbers one through twenty and the 
concepts of color and shape. 

Manning, Paul. Fisherman. New York: Macmillan, 1987. 
o.p. 

A fisherman makes his catch but experiences some rough weather before returning home safe and sound. 

McDonald, Megan. Is This A House for Hermit Crab? New York: Orchard, 1990. 

ISBN 0531084558 $16.99 

When Hermit Crab outgrows his old house, he ventures out to find a new one. 

McMillan, Bruce. Going on a Whale Watch. New York: Scholastic, 1992. 

ISBN 0590728261 $19.95 

Two six-year-olds on a whale-watching expedition see different kinds of whales engaging in such_activities-as 
headstanding and lunge feeding. Includes facts about each kind of whale. 

O'Malley, Kevin. Carl Caught A Flying Fish. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996. 

ISBN 0689800983 $13.00 

Because the flying fish which he caught gives him nothing but trouble both at home and at school. Carl throws 
it back into the water. 

O'Neill, Alexis. Loud Emily. New York: Simon &Schuster, 1998. 

ISBN 0689810784 $16.00 

A little girl with a big voice who lives in a nineteenth-century whaling town finds a way to be useful and happy 
aboard a sailing ship. 

Pfister, Marcus. The Rainbow Fish. New York: North-South Books, 1992. 

ISBN 1558585362 $9.95 

The most beautiful fish in the entire ocean discovers the real value of personal beauty and friendship. 

Pfister, Marcus. Rainbow Fish to the Rescue! New York: North-South Books, 1995. 

ISBN 1558588809 $9.95 



Although his friends want to ignore the new striped fish in their midst, Rainbow Fish must decide whether to 
help him when a shark attacks. 



| READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN | 



Raffi. Baby Beluga. New York: Crown, 1990. 

ISBN 0517578395 $16.00 

Presents the illustrated text to the song about the little white whale who swims wild and free. 

Rand, Gloria. Prince William. New York: H. Holt, 1992. 

ISBN 0805018417 $14.95 

On Prince William Sound in Alaska, Danny rescues a baby seal hurt by an oil spill and watches it recover at a 
nearby animal hospital. 

Reiser, Lynn. Beach Feet. New York: Greenwillow, 1996. 

ISBN 0688144012 $14.93 

The beach displays human feet which squish, splash, or rest, as well as animal feet which may number five, six, 
or even nine and which have many uses. 

Reiser, Lynn. Little Clam. New York: Greenwillow, 1998. 

ISBN 0688159087 $15.00 

After repeated warnings from his friends at the edge of the sea, a little clam digs in with his strong foot and 
succeeds in escaping the dangerous predators who want to eat him. 

Renner, Michelle. The Girl Who Swam With the Fish: An Athabascan Legend. Anchorage, Alaska Northwest, 
1995. 

ISBN 0882404423 $15.95 

A young girl waits on a riverbank for the salmon to return, wondering where they have traveled and what they 
have seen. 

Ryder, Joanne. Sea Elf. New York: Morrow, 1993. 

ISBN 0688100600 $15.00 

As a young sea otter, the reader enjoys a day of hunting, grooming and playing in a California cove. 

Savage, Stephen. Animals of the Oceans. Austin, TX: Raintree Steck-Vaughn, 1997. 

ISBN 081724753X $22.83 

Describes the world's seas and oceans and the mammals, fish, reptiles, and invertebrates that live in them. 

Schindel, John. Something' s Fishy. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993. 
o.p. 



Roy visits a fishing hole harboring an octopus named Gus, but what he pulls out on his fishing line is something 
of a surprise. 

Sharratt, Nick. Look What I Found! Cambridge, Mass.: Candlewick, 1992. 
o.p. 

The interesting things a little girl discovers as she walks on the beach with her father, including a shell, a crab, 
seaweed, and intriguing footprints, can be seen by the reader when the half-pages are turned. 



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Shaw-MacKinnon, Margaret. Tiktala. New York: Holiday House, 1996. 

ISBN 0823412210 $15.95 

When the Spirit Guide changes her into a seal, Tiktala learns the ways of seals and how harmful humans can be. 

Stevenson, James. Clams Can’t Sing. New York: Greenwillow, 1980. 
o.p. 

Two clams prove to their beach friends that even if they can't sing they do have other talents. 

Tafuri, Nancy. Follow Me! New York: Greenwillow, 1990. 

ISBN 0688087744 $15.93 

A sea lion follows a wandering crab to an entire colony of crabs and then returns to its fellow sea lions. 

Wood, Audrev. The Rainbow Bridge: Inspired by a Chumash Tale. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 
1995. 

ISBN 0152654755 $16.00 

A contemporary story based on the Chumash Indian legend about the origin of dolphins. 

Wood, Jakki. Across the Big Blue Sea: An Ocean Wildlile Book. Washington, DC: National 
Geographic Society, 1998. 

ISBN 0792273087 $14.95 

Follow the little red boat as it travels across many oceans. More than 60 sea animals glide through the pages of 
this journey. 



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Ocean Bibliography 

Submitted by Pat Scheiffer, Tucson-Pima Public Library 


Crews, Donald 




Harbor 


Hill, Eric 




Soot Goes to the Beach 


Kalan, Robert 




Blue Sea 


Lionni, Leo 




Fish is Fish 


Lionni, Leo 




Swimmv 


McDonald 




Is this a Home for Hermit Crab 


Pallotta 




Ocean Alphabet Book 


Rockwell,Anne 




Boats 


Rogers, Paul 




Foraet-Me-Not 


Ross 

Oceans 




Crafts for Kids Who are Wild about 


Watanabe 




I'm the King of the Castle 


Zion Gene 




Harry by the Sea 



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PRESCHOOL BIBLIOGRAPHY 



“Reading: from Sea to Shining Sea” 

Preschool Bibliography 

(The librarian can use many of the selections from this bibliography to set the stage or enrich the preschool 
activities included. Some may be used "as is" for preschool story hours; others should be"edited" to suit the 
attention span of the preschoolers involved.) 

Code: E (East Coast), S (South), M (Mid-West), 

W (West), A (Alaska), H (Hawaii) 

Ata, Te, Baby Rattlesnake (W) 

San Francisco, Children's Book Press, Distributed by Tamen Co, 1989. ISBN 0-89-239049-2. 

Willful baby Rattlesnake throws tantrums to get his rattle before he’s ready, but he misuses it and learns a 
lesson. 

Baumann, Hans, Chip has Many Brothers. (W, A) 

New York, Philomel Books, 1985. ISBN 0-399-21283-3. 

Although Chip has two older brothers who are hunters, it is his animal brothers. Moose, Bear and Beaver who 
help him accomplish a perilous task. 

Calhoun, Mary, Jack and the Whoopee Wind (M) 

New York, William Morrow & Co, 1987. ISBN 0-688-06137-0. 

Mad at the wind for blowing everything away. Jack tries a succession of ways to stop it. 

Cobb, Mary, The Quilt-Block History Of Pioneer Days: With Projects Kids Can Make (E, M, W) 

Brookfield, Connecticut : Millbrook Press, 1995. ISBN: 1-562-94485-1. 

Find out what dozens of quilt block designs have to say about America’s early days. Easy paper craft projects 
will let you make your own quilt blocks without sewing a stitch. 

Hayward, Linda, All Stuck Uil (S) 

New York: Random House, c l 990. ISBN: 0-679-91216-3. 

Brer Fox makes a tar baby in order to catch Brer Rabbit. (This simplified version works well for preschool 
storytimes) 

Hopkinson, Deborah, Sweet Clara And The Freedom QujlL (S) 

New York: Knopf, 1993. ISBN: 0-67-9923 11-X (Gibraltar library edition) ISBN: 0-67-982311-5 (trade) 

A young slave stitches a quilt with a map pattern which guides her to freedom in the North. 

Hurd, Thacher, Mama Don't Allow ( S) 

Harper Trophy, 1984. ISBN: 0-06-022690-0. 

Miles and the Swamp Band have the time of their lives playing at the Alligator Ball, until they discover the 
menu includes Swamp Band Soup. 

Isaacs, Anne, Swamp Angel ( S) 

New York : Dutton Children's Books, 1994. 

Along with other amazing feats, Angelica Longrider, also known as Swamp Angel, wrestles a huge bear, known 
as Thundering Tarnation, to save the winter supplies of the settlers in Tennessee. 

Joosse, Barbara M., Mama, Do You Love Me ?(A) 

San Francisco : Chronicle Books, 1991. ISBN: 087701759X. 

A child living in the Arctic learns that a mother’s love is unconditional. 



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PRESCHOOL BIBLIOGRAPHY 



Keller, Holly, Henry's Fourth of July 

New York: Greenwillow Books, cl985. ISBN: 0688040136. 

Henry has a fun-filled day celebrating the Fourth of July with his family and friends. 

Kellogg, Steven, Sally Ann Thunder Ann Whirlwind Crockett : A Tall Tale (S, M) 

New York: Morrow Junior Books, cl995. ISBN: 0-68-814043-2. 

Sally Ann, wife of Davy Crockett, fears nothing-and proves it when braggart Mike Fink tries to scare her. 

Ludwig, Warren, Good morning. Granny Rose: An Arkansas folktale (S) 

New York: Putnam's, c 1990. ISBN: 0-399-21950-1. 

Granny Rose and her old dog Henry get lost in a blizzard and share a cave with a sleepy bear. 

Laird, Donivee Martin, The Three Little Hawaiian Pigs And The Magic Shark (H) 

Honolulu, Hawaii : Barnaby Books, cl981. ISBN: 0940350084. 

Three little pigs who have built their houses of pili grass, driftwood, and lava rock are threatened by a very 
angry shark in disguise. 

Martin, Jacqueline Briggs, Bizzy Bones And The Lost Quilt 

New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, cl988. ISBN: 0-68-807408-1. 

When Bizzy loses the quilt he needs to go to sleep, Uncle Ezra and the orchard mice try to make him a new 
one. 

McPhail, David M, Farm Morning, (M) 

San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, cl985. ISBN: 0-15-227299-2. 

A father and his young daughter share a special morning as they feed all the animals on their farm. 

McPhail, David M, Pig Pig And The Magic Photo Album 

New York: Dutton, cl986. ISBN: 0-52-544238-3. 

While waiting to have his picture taken, Pig practices saying "Cheese" as he looks through a photo album and is 
amazed at the outcome. (Try using your own "photo album" with pictures of different parts of the 
country to set the stage for each session's activities. Use a magic word such as "books" or "reading") 

Neitzel, Shirley, The Bag I'm Taking To Grandma's 

New York: Greenwillow Books, cl995. ISBN: 0688129617. 

In cumulative verses and rebuses a young boy and his mother have different views on how to pack a bag for a 
trip to Grandma’s. 

Wheels on the bus : Raffi songs to read 
New York: Crown, 1988. ISBN: 0517567849. 

As the rickety old bus collects an odd assortment of passengers in a quaint little town, the reader may join in 
with the sounds of the bus and motions of the driver and passengers. 

Scott, Ann Herbert, On Mother's Lap (A) 

New York, McGraw-Hill, 1972. ISBN: 0070558973. 

A small Eskimo boy discovers that mother’s lap is a very special place with room for everyone. 

Spier, Peter, Crash! Bang! Boom! 

Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday, 1972. ISBN: 0385067801. 

Pictures of various objects or actions and "words” representative of the sounds they make arranged by 
category-kitchen sounds, school sounds, traffic sounds, etc. A good book to introduce the topic of the loud 
sounds of fireworks for the 4th of July. 

Waddell, Martin, Happy Hedgehog Band fS) 

Cambridge, Mass.: Candlewick Press, 1992. ISBN: 1-56-402011-8 



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Happy hedgehogs with drums inspire the other animals in Dickon Wood to join them in making lively music. 

Waterstone, Rachel, Who’s Under Grandma’s Quilt? 

Corinth, Miss.: First Story Press, cl997. ISBN: 1-89-032608-9 

The search is on for who's hiding under Grandma's quilt, with the animals working in cooperation with one 
another except for one tattletale piglet. 






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Recommended resource: 

Totline Magazine 

Published by: Totline Publications 

P.O. Box 2250 
Everett, WA 98203 
(800) 609-1724 

One-year subscription: $24.00 

Totline Magazine offers six issues a year, in January, March, May, July, September and November. Though it 
is aimed for teachers and caregivers of one-to three-year old children. I’ve found that the ideas work just as 
well for older preschoolers. You will find a wealth of poetry, crafts, games and reproducible art in each issue. 




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CO 



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DISPLAY AND BULLETIN BOARD IDEAS 




Travel Through Time Bulletin Board and Program 




Try this bulletin board and program to record reading collectively. The party’s at 4:00! Keep track of the number 
of books patrons read using a time zone map. Each time they rack up another 10, 50, or 100 books (or whatever number 
you choose), the group travels to another time zone. Start at 1:00 on the West Coast and read eastward towards your 4:00 
party. With a huge map on the wall, invite kids to color in each time zone as you complete it. Have a Time-to-Read Group 
Read- in at the library, with an alarm clock ringing whenever a book is completed. 

contributed by Liza Bliss, Worcester Public Library 



Registration Station 



Add coaches as you wish to represent weeks of the program, one for each reading group, special programs- 
or for whatever “train” of thought you may have! 




4r0-00 J 




la • I 



Sketch contributed by Sheila Granger, Grafton Public Library 



Published with permission granted by the Massachusetts Regional Systems- 1994, “ Ticket To Read At Your State Library 

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BULLETIN BOARD IDEAS 



Postcard Display 

Place a United States map on a bulletin board and ask children to mail you a postcard from where they vacation over 
the summer. Staple the post cards around the map, using yarn to connect the postcard to the place. 




Chalk Walk 

Invite children to the library the week before July 4th. Give them buckets of chalk and ask them to decorate the 
sidewalk in front of the library for the Fourth of July. SUGGESTION: Teach the kids how to draw, at a cartoon 
workshop, then turn them loose after the program. 





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State Pattern for use with: 

The Scrambled States of America by Laurie Keller. Henry Holt and Co. 
New York, c!998 ISBN 0-8050-5802 







MASSACHUSETTS Bos,on * 



££l 





N3raaiIH3 30 V 1QQHDS M03 SIMVMDOHd 



V3S ONINIHS OX V3S WOMjOYM 



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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN 






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191 



ERiC 



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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN 









CAROUNA 



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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN 



To be used with Snake Alley Band by Elizabeth Nygaard. 




Cut along dotted lines and tape together to make a headband for each picture. 





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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN 



To be used with Snake Alley Band by Elizabeth Nygaard. 




bubbled 
POP-POP-DOO-WOP 



Cut along dotted lines and tape together to make a headband for each picture. 




138 

194 




CuUlong dottedlines and tapetogether lo make a headband for each picture. 

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To be used with Snake Alley Band by Elizabeth Nygaard. 





chirped 

Chew-up chew-up 



Cut along dotted lines and tape together to make a headband for each picture. 



U(U . - 

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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN 



To be used with Snake Alley Band by Elizabeth Nygaard. 




Cut along dotted lines and tape together to make a headband for each picture. 



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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN 

To be used with Snake Alley Band by Elizabeth Nygaard. 




thumped 

TA-TOOM TA-TOOM TOONI 



Cut along dotted lines and tape together to make a headband for each picture. 



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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN 



“Marble-ous” Ideas 

For more great ideas using marbles look in The Mailbox June/July 1999 issue. 



Marble Contraptions 

Have some real fun. A marble contraption workshop! This can be done in one day or over a period of several days. 
The program can end with a demonstration of each contraption, refreshments and even prizes for the most creative 
contraptions. 

First have kids observe as you build a simple marble track. To do this, fold a few strips of tagboard in half, forming a 
“v” shape, (strips should be at least 2 inches wide) and tape the resulting “chutes" together. Elevate on end of the 
track to create a slope. Insert the other end of the track into a cardboard tube (toilet paper roll will work). At the 
opposite end of the tube place a domino and behind it a three-ounce paper cup. Explain to the kids that you hope to 
drop a marble onto the start of athe track and have it end up inside the cup. Invite their predictions and then test the 
contraption you’ve built. Next ask the kids how to improve your contraption. Make adjustments based on their 
suggestions and retest the project. 

Suggested Supplies: Scissors, staplers, making tape, markers, paper scraps, paper tubes, craft sticks, wood blocks, 
paper cups and of course marbles. You may even ask the participant to bring supplies from home. 




Marbleized Masterpieces 

Marble art! Here’s all you need: marbles, a variety of colors of paint, one plastic cup for each color of paint, 
plastic spoons for each cup, drawing or construction paper and a sturdy box lid (like from copy paper). 

place a few marbles in each cup of paint 

lay the piece of paper in the box lid 

using a spoon, remove one marble from one color paint 

place it on the paper and tilt the lid back and forth, causing marble to leave trails 
carefully return marble to paint cup 

choose the same (or different) color and repeat the process until desired effect is 
achieved 

when the paint trails diy, these masterpieces can be framed, made into cards-the sky’s the limit! 



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Marble Tournaments! 

Young and old have been playing marble games for thousands and thousands of years. To get the 
lowdown on the history of the game, different types of marbles and playing surfaces, marble lingo, 
and 101 playing options and activities.Check out Marbles: 101 Ways to Play by Joanna Cole 
and Stephanie Calmenson. New York: Morrow Junior Books, cl998. ISBN 0688122051. 



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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN 




State Name Scramble! 


1. iwnnsiosc 




2. Mabaala 


3. soldiedahnr 




4. Snepanvaliny 


5.ogoner 




6. Fialociran 


7. aihwai 




8. Exast 


9. saknsa 




10. Gionywm 


11. noizara 




12. Hoida 


13. ontinucctce 




14. randylam 


15. iwoa 




16. Naolarcnitrho 


17. irgivnia 




18. Huat 


19. osutokdaath 




20. artisignwive 


21. iooh 




22. Sentesene 


23. ejeswernv 




24. Uacshotrinoal 


25. dirfalo 




26. Clonatotahrk 


27. wmxennioc 




28. Nnamota 


29.daevna 




30. Ewidaare 


31. washripemehn 




32. Mnervot 


33. rekwonv 




34. Riwuwomi 


35. usaoilnia 




36. Stahsamsectus 


37. oiinllisi 




38. Lamookah 


39. raskanas 




40. Aroeggi 


41. cihgamin 




42. Teckunyk 


43. sakala 




44. Lodoraco 


45. enima 




46. Oghswantin 


47. smspiispisi 




48. Krasbena 


49. dinnaia 




50. nomiestan 




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Answers to State Name Scramble 




1. Wisconsin 




2. Alabama 


3.Rhode Island 




4. Pennsylvania 


5. Oregon 




6.Califomia 


7.Hawaii 




8. Texas 


9. Kansas 




10. Wyoming 


1 1 . Arizona 




12. Idaho 


13. Connecticut 




14. Maryland 


15. Iowa 




16. North Carolina 


17. Virginia 




18. Utah 


19. South Dakota 




20. West Virginia 


21. Ohio 




22. Tennessee 


23. New Jersey 




24. South Carolina 


25. Florida 




26. North Dakota 


27. New Mexico 




28. Montana 


29. Nevada 




30. Delaware 


31. New Hampshire 




32. Vermont 


33. New York 




34. Missouri 


35. Louisiana 




36. Massachusetts 


37. Illinois 




38. Oklahoma 


39. Arkansas 




40. Georgia 


41. Michigan 




42. Kentucky 


43. Alaska 




44. Colorado 


45. Maine 




46. Washington 


47. Mississippi 




48. Nebraska 





49. Indiana 



50. Minnesota 



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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN 



Name That Capitol 

Put the name of the capitol on the line next to the name of the state 



Arizona 



Michigan 



Washington 



New York 



North Carolina 



Texas 



Illinois 



Florida 



Massachusetts 



Oklahoma 



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Name That Capitol 

Put the name of the capitol on the line next to the name of the state. 



Arizona 



Phoenix 



Michigan 



Lansing 



Washington 



Olympia 



New York 



Albany 



North Carolina Raleigh 




Texas 



Austin 



Illinois 



Springfield 



Florida 



Tallahassee 



Massachusetts 



Boston 




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Oklahoma 



Oklahoma City 



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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN \ 



Beach Scramble 



Unscramble these things that have to do with the beach. 



alpi 



dans 



labl 



tescla 



econa 



mulralbe 



dofo 



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Beach Scramble 



Unscramble these things that have to do with the beach. 



alpi 



pail 



dans 



sand 



labl 



ball 



tescla 



castle 



econa 



ocean 



mulralbe 



umbrella 



dofo 



food 




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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN 



Ray and his family are taking a vacation around the United States stopping at different 
places along the way. On the line next to the place put the name of the state it is located 
in. 



Grand Canyon 



Mount Rushmore 



Library of Congress 



Statue of Liberty 



Space Needle 



Walt Disney World 



Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 



Grand Old Opry 



The Alamo 



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Grand Canyon 



Arizona 



Mount Rushmore 



South Dakota 



Library of Congress 



Washineton D.C 



Statue of Liberty 



New York/New Jersey 



Space Needle 




Washington 



Walt Disney World 



Florida 



Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 



Ohio 



Grand Old Opry 



Tennessee 



The Alamo 



Texas 




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SISTER CITY PEN PALS: Choose a community in Arizona and arrange with the Children’s Librarian to have 
library pen pals this summer. Or, start earlier and contact the library in a community in another country. 

CAMPING PROGRAM FOR OLDER CHILDREN: Do you know someone who owns camping equipment? 
Invite him/her to visit, or borrow the materials you’ll need: a backpack filled with camping equipment. It’s best to do the 
program outside where you and the children can set up the tent, lay out the sleeping bag, etc. As you take items out of 
the pack, explain their use. Buy some freeze-dried food to sample or make instant pudding in a ziplock bag. This program 
is best done with a small group so that children can have a hands-on experience. 

PAPER CHAINS: Help kids make long train, truck, or car paper chains. After they are cut and colored, they 
make festive decorations. 




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BOOKS AHOY! 

Climb to the door to the top of the lighthouse and turn on the light for ships passing by. 



Used with permission from “1998 Books Ahoy!”, Vermont Department of Libraries, P. 177. 



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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN | 




BOOKS AHOY! 

Climb to the door to the top of the lighthouse and turn on the light for ships passing by. 




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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN) 



This Little Bird 

Written by Gail Benton and Trisha Waichulaitis 
(sung to the tune of This Old Man) 



This little bird, began to roam 
Looking for a place to call his home, 

With a hip hop, flippity flop, now he’s on his way 
This little bird set off today. 

This little bird, he flew north 

Rained so hard he zipped back and forth, 

With a hip hop, flippity flop, now he’s on his way 
This little bird flew north today. 




This little bird, he flew east 
Carrying a knapsack with a feast, 

With a hip hop, flippity flop, now he’s on his way 
This little bird flew east today. 



This little bird, he flew south 
Holding a suitcase in his mouth, 

With a hip hop, flippity flop now he’s on his way 
This little bird flew south today. 




This little bird, he flew west 
Found a sunny Arizona nest, 

With a hip hop, flippity flop, he’s not goin away 
This little bird is here to stay. 





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I HAD AN OLD COAT 

A folksong by Paul Kaplan 



I had an old coat but the coat got tom, what’ll I do 
I had an old coat but the coat got tom, what’ll I do 
I had an old coat but the coat got tom, so I cut it down 
And a jacket was bom and I sing every day of my life. 

In a few years those threads got thin, what’ 11 1 do 
In a few years those threads got thin, what’ll I do 
In a few years those threads got thin, so I called it a shirt 
and I tucked it in and I sing every day of my life. 

The sleeves wore out in the east and west, what’ll I do 
The sleeves wore out in the east and west, what’ll I do 
The sleeves wore out in the east and west, so I pulled them off 
and I had a vest and I sing every day of my life. 

I stained that vest with cherry pie, what’ 11 1 do 
I stained that vest with cherry pie, what’ll I do 
I stained that vest with cherry pie, so I cut and sewed 
‘till I had a tie and I sing every day of my life. 

When the tie was lookin’ lean, what’ll I do 
When the tie was lookin’ lean, what’ 11 1 do 
When that tie was a lookin’lean, I made a patch 
For my old blue jean and I sing every day of my life. 

Now when that patch was next to nothin’ , what’ll I do 
Now when that patch was next to nothin’, what’ll I do 
Now when that patch was next to nothin’ , I rolled it up 
Into a button and I sing every day of my life. 

Well, when that button was almost gone, what’ll I do 
When that button was almost gone, what’ll I do 
When that button was almost gone, with what was left 
I made this song and I sing every day of my life. 



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To be used with / Had An Old Coat by Paul Kaplan 



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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN| 




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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN 



I HAD AN OLD COAT 
CROSSWORD PUZZLE 




Designed by Gail & Trisha. 1999 



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I HAD AN OLD COAT 
CROSSWORD PUZZLE 
ANSWERS 





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SONGS AND FINGERPLAYS: 



OCEAN SHELL 

I found a great big shell one-day. 

Upon the ocean floor. 

I held it close up to my ear. 

I heard the ocean roar! 

I found a tiny little shell one day. 

Upon the ocean sand. 

The waves had worn it nice and smooth. 

It felt nice in my hand 



(hold hands cupped as if 
holding-large shell) 

(raise hands to ear) 

(one hand cupped as if 
holding a tiny shell) 

(pretend to roll shell 
between palms of both 
hands) 



I WALKED TO THE BEACH 

I walked to the beach- 
And what did I see? 

A lot of little fishes, 

Looking at me! 

I jumped into the water, 

And splashed all around! 

The fishes swain away, 

And didn’t make a sound! 



(swing arms, walk in place) 

(hand over eyes, looking) 

(hands together, move like a fish) 
(point to self) 

(jump) 

(palms down-splashing motions) 
(hands together, move like a fish) 
(fingers to lips) 



ON A DAY AT THE BEACH 



This is the way we put sunscreen on. 



Sunscreen on, sunscreen on. 

This is the way we put sunscreen on. 

On a day at the beach 

This is the way we find the seagulls, 

” dig in the sand, 

” Go for a swim, 

” toss a frisbee,. 

” eat our lunch, 

” build a sandcastle, 
etc. 



(to the tune of ’’Here we Go Round the 
Mulberry Bush”) 

(act out each verse) 




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Used with permission from “Drop Anchor in a Good Book ”, State Library of Ohio. 



Title of Program: Pirates on the High Seas! 

Primary 



Contributor: Robin Ann Jones 

Bainbridge Library 
17222 Snyder Road 
Chagrin Falls, Ohio 44023 



Age: Preschool, 
Length: 1 hour 



Supplies: Drawing pad or chalkboard, CD, tape, or record player, pirate decorations. If you have a Long 
John Silver's restaurant in your neighborhood, perhaps they could donate hats for the children to wear. 



Program Description: Create a storytime program that lets your imagination set sail with stories, songs, 
and fingerplays about pirates and the pirate's lifestyle. 



Finger play: 

Captain of the Pirates 

I’m a fierce pirate (brandish sword or dagger) 
Captain of my ship. 

I stride the deck (walk in place ) 

With hand on hip. (hands on hips) 



Our big black flag 

Shows a skull and bones, (cross hands over chest) 

When other ships spy us, (hand over eyes, or pretend to look through telescope) 
Everybody moans! (throw up hands and moan) 

Out of the hold 

Dark and dank, (climb ladder with hands) 

We bring the captive (hands tied behind back) 

Who walks the plank! (walk fingers of one hand off index finger of other hand) 
With our gold and silver, 

Away we go 

With many a SHOUT (cup hands around mouth) 

And a YO-HO-HO! (say loudly) 



Use any of the following sources of music for your program: 

Smith, Gary The Happy Pirate 
Harley, Bill. Big World 

Disney, Walt Childrens Favorite's 2 (features "Sailing Medley") 





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Sea to Shining Sea 



Ideas for older children: 



• Ask kids to pretend they have met an alien and need to teach them about life in the United States. Create a 
collage that would teach the aliens about the American Culture. 

• Scavenger Hunt - Divide participants into several groups. Give each group a region of the United States to 
explore. After the groups have found information (ie - temperatures, famous landmarks etc.) ask them to 
create a story about their region. This can be used to teach about basic library skills and an opportunity for 
creative writing. 

• Make models of famous landmarks out of newspaper and recycled cardboard. Can be as simple or complex 
as time allows. 



* Have children create a new license plate for our state or any other in the US. 




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STUFF WITH A STRING 



Idea for “tin can fiddle” taken from Sound Science by Etta Kaner Addison-Wesley; cl991. ISBN 0-201 -5675 8-X 

Tin Can Fiddle 



You will need: 

• can opener 

• large juice can (empty) 

• nail 

• hammer 

• heavy string (enough to reach 
from the floor to the middle of 
your thigh.) 

• small wooden dowel or pencil 

Remove the lid if it’s still attached. 

Using the nail, punch a hole in the 
middle of the bottom of the can. 



Thread the string up through the 
hole and tie a large knot in the end. 



Pull the remaining string through 
the hole and tie the wooden dowel 
(or pencil) to the other end. 



To play: 

• place the can on the floor 

put your foot on top of the can 
to hold it in place 

• Hold the pencil in your hand, 
making sure the string is straight 
up and down 

• Pluck the string with your finger. 



CUP POPPER 



You will need: 

• 18” piece string 

• styrofoam cup 

Tie a loop in each end of the string. Next tie large knots at Vi ’ 
intervals. This is only an approximate measure. Poke a small 
hole in the bottom of the cup and thread one looped end through. 



Hold the styrofoam cup in one hand and slowly pull the string 
through the hole. This will produce a “popping” sound. 



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PIE PLATE CYMBALS 



MORE JUG BAND INSTRUMENTS 



You will need: 

* • 2 disposable aluminum pie tins 

• 2 small wooden knobs 

• 2 screws 

• pencil or nail 

Using a nail or pencil, make a hole in the center of 

each pie tin. Attach knob, with screw, to the outside of each pie tin. 

To play: 

• Hold cymbals by knobs and bang away! 

STRING INSTRUMENT 

You will need: 

• milk carton or shoe box 

• several rubber bands of varying sizes 

• scissors 

Cut a round hole approximately 3” in diameter 
in one side of the milk carton or lid of the shoe 
box. 

String rubber bands around the length of box 
Approximately Vi" apart. 

Secure rubber bands with heavy tape. 

To play: 

• Hold instrument on lap and strum or pluck. 

TRIANGLE 



You will need: 

• wire clothes hanger 

• rubber band or 6” piece of string 

• spoon 

Tie string into a circle and slip on to hanger’s top 
(or rubber band). This will form the handle. 

To play: 

• Hold hanger by handle. 

• Strike hanger with spoon. 



More ideas for noise makers! 

String an assortment of kitchen utensils on heavy cord and strike with metal spoon. OR Place several keys on a 
string and shake. OR Fill and empty tin can with small pebble or marbles, seal shut and shake. OR Pan lids 
banged together. 



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HARVEST CORN DOLLIES 



Information taken from the following internet site: OCPA Homepage - Classroom Resources 

Ontario Com Producers’ Associations 
90 Woodlawn Road, West, Guelph, Ontario, N1H 1B2, Canada 



In England, where corn refers to any grain, such as wheat, rye or oats, good luck harvest figures called 
com dollies are made each year. You can make your own from com. 



FOR YOUR CORNHUSK FIGURE YOU WILL NEED 



• Com husks, fresh or dried, about 6-8 pieces. (NOTE: If you are using dried husks, 
soak them in water to soften them. Fresh husks need no special preparation.) 

• String 

• Cotton balls, about 4 

• Scraps of cloth, yam, beads, and pipe cleaners (optional) 



Step 1: Take a strip of husk and place a few 
cotton balls in the middle, twisting and tying it 
with string to make a head. 



Make some arms by folding another husk and 
tying it near each end to make hands. Slip the 
arms between the husks that extend under the 
head. Tie the waist with string. 



Step 2: Arrange enough husks around the 
figure’s waist so that they overlap slightly, 
tie them in place with string. 



Step 3: Fold the husks down carefully. For 
a woman wearing a long skirt, cut the husks 
straight across at the hem. To make a man, 
divide the skirt in two and tie each half at 
the ankles. Let the figure dry completely. 



Step 4: You can leave your figure as is, or 
give it a face, hair, or even some fancier 
clothes. Use a fine-tipped marker to draw 
facial features. Glue some fuzzy yam on 
for hair. Add some tiny beads for buttons, 
and bits of fabric for aprons or vests. A pipe 
cleaner staff or cane will help the man stand 
upright. 




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QUICK TRIP-CRAFTS 

MOSAICS: Materials-Cardboard or poster board, glue, and small piece of colored paper or tissue paper. Draw an 
outline of a ship, rocket, car, or other object on the cardboard /poster board. Glue small pieces of paper into the 
outline shape. 




WHITE SAILS: Materials - Tissue paper (light blue, dark blue, green, white), liquid starch, white paper, 
paintbrush. Brush liquid starch over white paper and cover with tissue paper, light blue at the top for the sky and 
dark blue and green at the bottom for the water. While background is drying cut out white sailboat shapes from white 
tissue paper and then glue to background. 





Published with permission granted by the Massachusetts Regional Systems- 1994, "Ticket To Read At Your State Library 




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QUICK TRIP CRAFTS 

FELT TRAVEL BOX: Materials - Felt, glue, magazines, and scissors. Cut a piece of felt to fit the inside of a 
shoe box lid. Glue the felt into the lid. Cut out pictures from magazines that have to do with travel, other regions of 
the U.S., etc. Glue the pictures onto the felt 

PAPER TOWEL AIRPLANE: Materials - 2 empty paper towel rolls, 1 toilet paper roll, 3 ice cream sticks, 
glue, crayons, ruler, scissors, pencil. Measure 3" from one end of one paper towel roll and mark with a line. Measure 
2" from line and draw another line. Make a slit where second line is drawn and insert second paper towel tube in slit, 
glue in place. For the tall cut a slit on each side of the end of the first tube and insert toilet paper roll, glue in place. 
Glue together 2 ice creams sticks into an X, glue to front of plane for propeller. Color plane with windows, people, etc. 

HALF-GALLON BUS: Materials-Half-gallon cardboard milk carton, scissors, tape, glue, construction 
paper, markers, cardboard. Open top of milk carton, trim flaps, and close with tape. Cut out pieces of construction 
paper to decorate carton, and glue on. Color covered paper with markers, draw people, windows, signs, etc. Cut out 
wheels from cardboard and glue to carton. 

FANTASY MAPS: Create a fantasy island. Draw a map outline on a large piece of cardboard. Use yam, 
glitter, crayons, markers, paper, material and other materials to create mountains, streams, roads, etc. 

MOUNTAIN LANDSCAPE: Make a contour model of a mountain out of styrofoam or thick cardboard. First 
trace each contour line on a piece of paper, number each one in order. Trace or cut along each line on the styrofoam 
or cardboard, keep sections in order. Glue the sections together, from bottom to top, to create the 3-dimensional 
model. 




ROCKET WINDSOCK: Materials- 12x18 piece of construction paper, stapler, streamers, glue, scissors, cotton, glitter, 
paper punch, yam. Roll the construction paper into a tube with the 12" sides overlapping (one inch). Staple the tube 
down the side. Cut 12" lengths of streamers. Glue the streamers around the bottom edge of the tube, so that they 
hang down. Decorate the rocket with glitter, paper, etc. Punch two small holes at top and string with yam for hanging. 




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QUICK TRIP PROGRAMS 



EXPANDING HORIZONS: Consider a program that runs 6-8 weeks in 2-week segments. Every segment 
focuses on a new theme, starting with local. Statewide activities and games, USA, then international activities and 
games. This approach gives children who have been away the opportunity to start at the beginning several times over 
the summer. 

For younger children: 

CANDY TRAIN: Use a packet of stick gum, still wrapped, and/or one roll of life savers for the body; wrapped 
fruit candy for wheels; a kiss for the smokestack; a caramel for the cabin. 

MAKE A SHIP: Use blue construction paper, 1/2 paper plate, a straw, glue, and paper shapes. Design a ship and 
glue it to the paper. 

MAKE A SUITCASE: fold brown paper in half and cut in the shape of a suitcase. Have children “open” the 
suitcase and pack it with pictures of clothes they have chosen and cut out of old catalogs. 

TRANSPORTATION DAY: Invite community individuals who have access to unusual modes of transportation 
to visit and park their vehicles near the library. Invite children to visit, view and explore. This program works well as a 
Heavy Equipment Day, too. 

DRAMATIC PLAY TRAVEL CENTER: Use scissors; a medium to large appliance box crayons or markers; 
paint, foil, or fabric scraps; cardboard blocks; construction paper; a hole punch, foil trays. Open the box to form a 3-sided 
screen. Cut one large window from each panel to make a windshield. Use decorative materials to fashion an instrument 
panel inside the box. Possibilities include a train, bus, taxi, helicopter and boat. 

THE GREAT TRANSPORTATION RACE: Each child colors and cuts from light cardboard a mode of 
transportation. These could already be cut out if the group is very young. Punch a hole in the top of each. Tie a length 
of string fairly low on a table leg, and then thread the end through the hole in your piece. Use a jerking motion with the 
string to race your piece to the finish. 

For older children: 

SOAP BOX DERBY: Contact the local cub scout leader to run a soap-box derby at the library. 

SCAVENGER HUNT, WITH THANKS: Add a twist to the traditional scavenger hunt by giving hunt participants 
an opportunity to thank the store owners they visit on their search. Children receive tickets which read: ‘Thank you for 
supporting Read: from Sea to Shining Sea at the library.” Add a space for the child’s name and phone number. As young 
people visit for the hunt, they leave a ticket. The merchant collects the tickets in an envelope, which you collect at the 
end of the hunt or week. Use the collected tickets to select the winner of a raffle. 



LITERARY SCAVENGER HUNT: Participants who read from a list and correctly answer scavenger hunt 
questions become eligible for prizes through a drawing. A great opportunity to cooperate with local schools to compile 
literary choices that are fun and worthwhile. Questions can be directed to a group of grades (3-4 or 5-6), or by single 
grade if the budget allows for more prizes. 

Published with permission granted by the Massachusetts Regional Systems- 1994, “Ticket To Read At Your State Library ”. 



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Title of Program: A Whale of a Tale! 

Contributor: Penny McGinnis 

Lynchburg Branch Library 



Age: Family 
Length: 1 Session 



Supplies: For the pictures, you will need paint (poster or watercolor), paint brushes, water, paper towels, 
white paper. An option would be to use shaped sponges for sponge painting. For the poetry, you will need 
paper, pencils or fine tip markers, if you want them to be colorful. 

Program Description: Introduce your program by talking about whales, where they live, what they eat, 
different kinds, etc. Have a selection of books, both fiction and non-fiction, on display. Share the stories All I 
See by Cynthia Ryland and I Wonder If Vll See a Whale by Francis Ward Weller. After sharing the story, 
break off into two groups. For younger children (ages 6-8), have them pretend they are the main character in 
the book All I See and paint pictures of whales or use the shaped sponges to make whale prints. For older 
children, have them try their hand at writing cinquaine poetry. Ask them to think about the story I Wonder If 
Vll See a Whale as they prepare to write. Explain that a cinquaine poem has 5 lines and is a very brief form of 
poetry. Line 1 consists of a noun, which introduces the poem. Line 2 is two adjectives describing the word 
used in Line 1. Line 3 is three verbs describing the actions of the topic in Line 1. Line 4 is a four- word phrase 
about the topic. Line 5 repeats the word in Line 1. Use the form provided that will help them along with then- 
writing. Once all painting and writing are done, display the creations for everyone to see. 



Title of Program: Rainbow Fish 

Contributor: Judi Ferrone 

The Wagnalls Memorial Library 
Lithopolis, Ohio 



Age: Primary, Intermediate 
Length: 45 minutes 



Supplies: Clear nail polish, black construction paper, various colors of construction paper, aluminum pan. 

Program Description: Fill a flat aluminum pan with water. Drop several drops of clear nail polish on the 
surface. Bend sheets of paper into a V-shape, letting the center hit the water and letting the sides down until 
they touch the water. Lift the paper out and let it dry. Cut the iridescent paper into small squares and glue as 
scales onto a fish shape. 



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PROGRAMS FOR BOOKS AHOY! 

BUBBLE PROGRAM 

Plan a day of playing with bubbles, using some of the following ideas: 

Bubble Solution 1: fill the bottom of a shallow pan with Yi inch water. Add 3 or 4 squirts of a liquid dishwashing 
detergent. Mix the solution gently so as not to make a lot of suds. Add a small amount of glycerin (available at 
most drugstores). 

Bubble Solution 2: Two-thirds cup liquid detergent - Dawn, Joy, and Ajax work well. Add water to make 
one gallon. Add one-tablespoon glycerin (optional). Allow solution to sit in an open container for at least one 
day before use. If you have time, allow the solution to sit for five days. Letting the solution age makes it work 
better. 

Bubble Solution 3: 6 cups water, 2 cups Lemon Joy dish detergent 
bubbles. 1/4 cup clear white Karo syrup-holds bubbles together. 

Experiment with different kind of bubble makers. Possibilities include 

cookie cutters 
drinking straws 
plastic six pack holder 
your hands 

coat hangers or wire bent into a circle or other shape 
plastic berry baskets 

Be sure to do these programs outdoors so there’s no problem with spills and broken bubbles. Let children 
try bubbles with different blowers, and then have a bubble blowing, contest. 



produces clear, rainbow-colored 




CHARTS 

Make up charts of imaginary trips based on THE AUTHORIZED AUTUMN CHARTS OF THE UPPER 
RED CANOE RIVER COUNTRY by Peter Zachary Cohen (Atheneum, 1972). Challenge kids to chart 
different courses for the trips described in the book, or to create ones of their own. The book’s outrageous 
directions that are delivered with total deadpan humor are sure to capture kids’ imaginations. 



229 



Used with permission from “1998 Books Ahoy\”, Vermont Department of Libraries, P. 41 . 



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POPSICLE STICK RAFT 

Have children construct a raft (or boat) out of popsicle sticks. No limit on size, design, how its constructed 
(glue, string, paint). Sail them in a race, test them in a tub of water to see whose floats. 

- Shelley Best, West Hartford Library, Vermont 



THREE MEN IN A TUB 

Make three men in a tub by cutting half a sponge into three pieces. The sponge pieces are the men, so add 
faces and other features as you want. For the tubs use a spray can lid. 



JAWS 

Fold a piece of cardboard in half. Trace a shark s head outline like the one below with the bottom on the 
outline of the fold. Cut out the head and glue it to a piece of blue paper, or paper with waves painted on it. 




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Title of Program: Yo Ho Ho and A Bottle of Milk 

Contributor: 

Robin Ann Jones 
Bainbridge Library 
Chagrin falls, Ohio 



Age: Primary 
Length: 1 hour 



Supplies: 2 small 6" paper plates (2 per child), red and black construction paper, white, blue, and orange 
round stickers, black markers. 



Program Description: Cut one paper plate in half. Staple half to the face of a whole paper plate. Fold top 
of the whole plate over so that there is a pocket for your fingers. Using the patterns provided, cut out a hat, eye 
patch, and tongue. Using the white stickers, make spots on the hat. Fold hat on fold line and glue or staple to 
the top of the whole plate. Stick eye and nose into place. Glue on eye patch and glue the tongue in the mouth. 
Using the black marker, draw in a mustache following the grooves on the plate. 

Books to Share: Bumingham, John. Come Away From the Water, Shirley 

Carryl, Charles. A Capital Ship: or, The Walloping Window-Blind 

Dewey, Ariane. Laffite, the Pirate 

Dyke, John. Pigwig and the Pirates 

Faulkner, Matt. The Amazing Voyage of Jackie Grace 

Ginburg, Mirra. Four Brave Sailors 

Haseley, Dennis. The Pirate Who Tried to Capture the Moon 
Hayes, Geoffrey. The Mystery of the Pirate Ghost 
Hutchins, Pat. One-eyed Jake 
Keats, Ezra. Maggie and the Pirate 

Kessler, Leonard. The Pirates’ Adventure on Spooky Island 
Kroll, Steven. Are You Pirates? 

Peppe, Rodney. The Kettleship Pirates 



Used with permission from 1998 “ Drop Anchor in a Good Book ”, State Library of Ohio, P 168-169. 



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All 



..American 




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PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN 



Jan Irving's book includes fingerplays, participation stories, flannel board stories, and songs on boats and ships. 

Books to Share: 

Allen, Pamela. I Wish / Had a Pirate Suit 
Dewetm, Ariane. Laffite, the Pirate 

Farber, Erica. Pirate Soup : Mercer Mayer's Critters of the Night 

Hayes, Geoffrey. The Mystery of the Pirate Ghost 

Irwing, Jan. Full Speed Ahead 

MacDonald, M. The Pirate Queen 

Mahy, Margaret. The Man Whose Mother Was a Pirate 

Ryan, John. Pugwash and the Buried Treasure: A Pirate Story 

Scarry, Richard. Pie Rats Ahoy! 

Sharrat, Nick. Mrs. Pirate 
Thompason. Draw and Tell 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT: E. Karen Beaty, Beavercreek Community Library 



Used with permission from ” Drop Anchor in a Good Book ”, State Library of Ohio, P. 1 19. 




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in 

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Summer Reading for Young Adults 

Young adults, ages 12-18, or in grades 7-12, are generally not included in youth summer reading programs 
unless they participate with the younger age group. Adolescents often lose interest in reading and library use if 
they are not encouraged as they move away from the Children's Room. They need a special reading program 
specifically geared toward teen interests that will promote reading and get them to use the library on their own. 
Many libraries have had successful programs for this age group judging by positive feedback from Arizona 
libraries that have done programs and by articles appearing in professional literature. (See bibliography for a 
selected list.) 

I. General Goals and Objectives 

A. To promote reading and library use among teens by 

1. offering incentives. 

2. providing programs for fun and information. 

3. creating booklists and bibliographies of interest. 

B. To increase young adult participation in the library by: 

1. offering volunteer opportunities to work in the library. 

2. asking teens to help in the planning and production of programs and activities for their 
peers. 

II Establishing a Young Adult Programs 

A. Establish a Theme 

1. Must be appropriate to the age group. Talk to teens themselves and be conscious of 
current trends in selecting a theme. Read current teen magazines to gather ideas. 

2. It is preferable to coordinate the teen theme with the juvenile theme, if possible. 

B. Design a Program 

1 . Devise a procedure and rules to log reading by: 

a. Pages read 

b. Minutes read 

c. Book reviews (entered onto computer or kept in file for peer reader advisory). 

d. Other; use your imagination! 

2. Decide upon appropriate incentives for teens. 

a. Fast food coupons. 

b. Theme park passes. 

c. Record, video, bookstore gift certificates. 

d. Shopping mall gift certificates. 

e. Bowling, batting, video arcade, skating passes. 

f. Clothing and jewelry. 

g. Hair care salons. 

h. Books and posters. 

3. Decide how purchased or donated incentives will be given out: 

a. Upon registering. 

b. As they turn in reading logs. 

c. Weekly drawings. 

d. Grand prize drawing. 

e. Some/all of the above. 




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4. Activities: 

a. Must be appropriate to the age level. 

b. Possible choices: 

Baby-sitting workshop 
College Financial Aid 
SAT Preparatory Workshop 
Sexuality information for parents 
and teens 

Junior High preparation/introduction 
Science fiction/fantasy illustration 
Role playing games or events: 
medieval crafts, costumes, swordplay 
Contests/puzzles that tie into theme. 



Cartooning 
T-shirt design 
Art shows 
Career exploration 
Creative writing 
Grooming and fashion 
Calligraphy 
Sign language 
Talent shows 
Baseball card collecting 



III Budget 

A. Locate Sponsors to help with funding: 

1. Friends of the Library 

2. Corporations and community businesses 

3. Grants 

4. Library budget 

5. Combination of above 

B. Minimize Expenditures 

1. Incentives 

a. Ask businesses to sponsor the program by giving coupons, gift certificates, or 
merchandise. 

al. Local businesses are usually more responsive than large national chains. 
a2. Start early - sometimes it takes a few months to get a response. 
a3. Donations should be acknowledged in publicity wherever possible. 
a4. Consider sending a token of the program with your thank-you. (Mesa 
Public Library sent a decal saying "We Support Reading at Mesa Public 
Library.") 

b. If library policy permits, you can also purchase incentives. 

2. Printing 

a. Check with printers or newspapers willing to print for little or no fee. 

3. Staff 

a. Hire temporary staff if funds are available. 

b. Use teen volunteers to administer program. 



IV. Publicity 

A. The program must be promoted primarily to teens. Some suggestions: 

1 . Booktalks in middle, junior, and senior high schools. 

2. Newspaper, radio, and television announcements. Contact school newspapers in early 
spring. Call favorite teen radio stations. 

3. Cable television bulletin boards. 

4. Community bulletin boards. 

5. PA announcements in schools. 

6. Displays, posters, and flyers in the school libraries. 

7. Inserts in community mailings. 

B. The program must also be promoted to parents. 



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SUMMER READING PROGRAM ACTIVITY 


THEME: 


Summer Pow Wow 


AGE GROUP: 


Young Adult 


BOOKS: 


Buffalo Hunt bv Russell Freedman 

Indian in the Cupboard bv Lvnn Reid Banks 

Display Native American books from your shelves. 


ACTIVITY: 


Ask a local Native American to demonstrate basket weaving. 


CRAFT: 


Use kits from S & S Arts and Crafts to make Kachina Spirit 
dolls, Mandals, Ojo De Dios, Jewelry, etc. 


ACTIVITY: 


How a Native American was named 


POEM: 


About Indians 


VIDEOS: 


The Indian in the Cupboard 
The Return of the Indian 
The Secret of the Indian 
The Mystery of the Cupboard 



Used with permission from the Tennessee State Library and Archives, 1999 Tennessee Summer Reading Program Manual based 
on the theme, “The Great Time Machine ”, P. 90. rj o O 

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SUMMER READING PROGRAM ACTIVITY 


THEME: 


The Rush for Gold 


AGE GROUP: 


Young Adult 


BOOKS: 


The Great American Gold Rush bv Rhoda Blumberg 
Gold: The True Storv of Whv Peode Search for It, Mine It 
Trade It. Steal It. Mint It. Hoard It. Shape It. Wear It. 
Fisht It. and Kill for It bv Milton Meltzer 

The California Gold Rush bv Elizabeth Van Steenwvk 
California: The Rush for Gold bv Linda R. Wade. 


ACTIVITY: 


Guest speaker: Have a jeweler come in and discuss 
the different types of gold, weight, styles, and cost of 
gold. How do you clean gold jewelry? 


HANDOUT: 


Give each child a gold foil wrapped candy! 


STORIES: 


Fools and Rascals: Louisiana Folktales. 
“Hiding the Gold” bv Calvin Andre Claude 
(add a Cajun accent when reading) 


OTHER: 


Recommended size of grouo: Anv size 
Length of Program: 30-45 minutes 



Used with permission from the Tennessee State Library and Archives, 1999 Tennessee Summer Reading Program Manual based 
on the theme, "The Great Time Machine”, P. 89. 



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A Deep Sea Tale... 



Reported by 

Great Underwater Explorer 



Write a short story about your dive deep in the ocean. Describe what you saw, 
how you felt, and tell about your discovery. 





Used with permission from “1998 Books Ahoy'.", Vermont Department of Libraries, and Center 

for Environmental Education, P. 73. 

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PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTS ' 



Discover Your Heritage 



Summary: 

This theme acquaints Young Adults with the idea of tracing their family roots and learning 
more about their family and culture. 



Procedure: 

1. Contact someone from either a local genealogy group, historical society, or someone 
who has done research on their own family and have them give an introduction to the 
basics of family research. Then choose from any or all of the following as follow-up 
activities/workshops. 

a. Create a "History Book" of your family using family photos, letters, stories, 
school records, newspaper pictures and articles, and any other memorabilia. Use 
two pieces of cardboard covered with wallpaper samples as covers. 

b. Find out the names of your ancestors through your Great Grandparents and 
record it on the family tree. 



c. Interview a family member. (See the Suggested list of interview questions) Have 
a luncheon where each participant brings a favorite "family" dish and then shares 
one of the things they learned from their interview. 



d. Find out how you got your name, look up it’s meaning, and illustrate it either 
with artistic lettering or a picture. Do matching game, using library Sources. 



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Interview Questions/Suggestions 
How did parents/grandparents meet? 



What is/was your neighborhood/town like? Is anyone from your neighborhood/town 
famous? Are there any ghosts in your neighborhood/town? 



How does our family celebrate special occasions, i.e. birthdays, holidays, etc. 



What games did your parents play when they were young? What did they do for fun? 



Describe a memorable vacation. 



Describe a childhood memory. 

Describe an embarrassing moment. 

Did you live in a home without electricity or modem appliances? What was it like? 

What was your parent's favorite story as a child? Are there any stories in your family about 
certain family members? 



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PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTS | 



Oryx Press has published an excellent series on genealogy for youth. There are 
currently twelve titles in the Oryx American Family Tree Series. 

Brockman, Terra. A Student's Guide to Italian American Genealogy. Oryx Press, 1996. 

Johnson, Anne E. A Student's Guide to British American Genealogy. Oryx Press, 1996. 

Johnson, Anne E. A Student's Guide to African American Genealogy. Oryx Press, 1996. 

Kabasch, E. Barrie. A Student's Guide to Native American Genealogy. Oryx Press, 1996. 

McKenna, Erin. A Student's Guide to Irish American Genealogy. Oryx Press, 1996. 

Paddock, Lisa Olson. A Student's Guide to Scandinavian American Genealogy. Oryx Press, 
1996. 



Robl, Gregory. A Student's Guide to German American Genealogy. Oryx Press, 1996. 

Rollyson, Carl Sokolnicki. A Student's Guide to Polish American Genealogy. Oryx Press, 
1996. 



Ryskamp, George R. A Student's Guide to Mexican American Genealogy. Oryx Press, 1996. 
Schleifer, Jay. A Student's Guide to Jewish American Genealogy. Oryx Press, 1996. 

She, Colleen. A Student's Guide to Chinese American Genealogy. Oryx Press, 1996. 



Yamaguchi, Yogi. A Student's Guide to Japanese American Genealogy. Oryx Press, 1996. 



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PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTS I 





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Historical Fiction-Immigration to America 



Angell, Judie. One Way to Ansonia (Russian) 

Avi. Beyond the Western Sea (Irish) 

Book One: The Escape from Home 
Book Two: Lord Kirkle's Money 

Brown, Irene Bennett. Willow Whip (Irish) 

Cohen, Barbara. Molly's Pilgrim (Russian) 

Crew, Linda. Children of the River (Cambodian) 

Cummings, Betty. Now, Ameriky (Irish) 

Gonzalez, Gloria. Gaucho (Puerto Rican) 

Hesse, Karen. Letters from Rifka (Russian) 

Lasky, Kathryn. A Journey to the New World: The Diary of Remember Patience Whipple: May flower fPlymoth 
Colony, 1620 (English) 

Levitin, Sonia. Annie's Promise (German) 

Journey to America (German) 

Silver Days (German) 

Littlefield, Holly. Fire at the Triangle Factory (Italian) 

Lord, Athena. The Luck ofZA.P. and Zoe (Greek) 

Lord, Bette. In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson (Chinese) 

Moskin, Marietta. Waiting for Mama (Russian) 

Namioka, Lensey. Yang the Youngest and His Terrible Ear (Chinese) 

Nixon, Joan Lowery. Land of Hope (Jewish) 

Land of Dreams (Swedish) Land of Promise (Irish) 

Ross, Lillian Hammer. Sarah, Also Know as Hannah (Ukranian) Siegel, Aranka Grace in the Wilderness 
(Swedish) 

Uchida, Yoshiko. The Happiest Ending (Japanese) Wartski, Maureen. Long Way From Home (Vietnamese) 

Woodruff, Elvira. The Orphan of Ellis Island (Italian) Yep, Laurence Child of the Owl (Chinese) 

Dragonwings (Chinese) 

Mountain Light (Chinese) 



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Match the Name with the Meaning 



Aaron 


Dawn, Brilliant Light 


Randolph 


Happy, Fortunate, Prosperous 


Felix 


Mountain of Strength 


Roxanne 


Brave 


Molly 


Good Council 


Gail 


King 


Michael 


Sweet Singer 


Roy 


Pretty 


Karen 


Black Stream 


Bonnie 


Noble Princess 


Sarah 


God-like 


Doug 


Pure, Unsullied 



24 G 




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Match the Name with the Meaning 


Aaron 


Dawn, Brilliant Light 


Randolph 


N. z' ^ Happy, Fortunate, Prosperous 


Felix^-^ 


\y ^Mountain of Strength 


Roxanne' 


\ JBrave 


Molly 


Xiood Council 


GaiU^ 


n. .King 


Michael 


^Sweet Singer 


Roy 


\. .Pretty 


Karen. 


.Black Stream 


Bonnie^^ 


\ Noble Princess 


Sarah^^^ 


>y n. 'God-like 



Doug 



Pure, Unsullied 



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PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTS 



From Benjamin Franklin to the Wright Brothers to Chester Floyd Carlson (inventor of 
the Xerox machine), America has produced many great inventors. 

Match the Invention with the Inventor 



Frisbee 


Carl Dickson 


Heimlich Maneuver 


Kellyan Coors 


Band-aid 


Benjamin Franklin 


Zipper 


Fred Morrison 


Electricity 


Washington Wentworth Sheffield 


Basketball 


Henry Heimlich 


Tooth Fairy Light 


Whitcomb L. Judson 


Toothpaste 


Ruth Wakefield 


Ear muffs 


Kimberley-Clark Co. 


Chocolate Chip Cookies 


Dr. James Naismith 


Blue jeans 


Chester Greenwood 



248 

190 



Kleenex 



Levi Strauss 



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PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTS | 



Match the Invention with the Inventor Answers 




2 



49 




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PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTS 




2 Its beak can bold more than its belly can ( 12 ) 

3 Bambi frolicked with bis mother in tbe open ; ( 6 ) 

4 A decoy in Mississippi ( 8 ) 

6 Don't run witb tailed flycatchers in your band! 

Especially in Oklahoma] ( 7 ) 

7 Beep Beep] ( 10 ) 

8 Rhode Island's colorful bird ( 3 ) 

lO This bird nests in the prickles ( 10 ) 

13 The Blue chicken is the state bird of Delaware 

15 California (Dan) ( 5 ) 

17 This finch would be a cinch for the Barney show. ( 6 ) 

18 good fun ( 4 ) 

ACROSS 



1 

3 

5 

9 

11 

12 

14 

16 

19 

20 



A sad bird is a . ( 8 ) 

, Superior, Erie, Ontario 

The flycatching state ( 8 ) 

Hush i or Papa ' s gonna buy you one 
The 2 best times for bird watching 
This bird struck it rich in Iowa 

fried Cardinal ( 8 ) 

Jonathan Livingston ( 7 

A tough bird, after a fight, is a 
The bird that is rockin' in three 



and Huron 



( 11 
( 9 ) 

) 

ruffed 

states 



( 8 ) 

( 11 ) 

) 



( 5 ) 



Information was gathered from the 1999 World Almanac 



( 6 ) 



BEST COPY AVAILABLE 



o 

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2 Its beak can hold more than its belly can ( 12 ) 

3 Bambi frolicked with his mother in the open ( 6 ) 

4 A decoy in Mississippi ( 8 ) 

6 Don't run with tailed flycatchers in your hand! 

Especially in Oklahoma! ( 7 ) 

7 Beep Beep! ( 10 ) 

8 Rhode Island's colorful bird ( 3 ) 

10 This bird nests in the prickles ( 10 ) 

13 The Blue chicken is the state bird of Delaware 

15 California (Dan) ( 5 ) 

17 This finch would be a cinch for the Barney show. ( 6 ) 

18 good fun ( 4 ) 



ACROSS 



I A sad bird is a . ( 8 ) 

3 , Superior, Erie, Ontario and Huron ( 8 ) 

5 The flycatching state ( 8 ) 

9 Hush! or Papa's gonna buy you one ( 11 ) 

II The 2 best times for bird watching ( ll ) 

12 This bird struck it rich in Iowa ( 9 ) 

14 fried Cardinal ( 8 ) 

16 Jonathan Livingston ( 7 ) 

19 A tough bird, after a fight, is a ruffed 

20 The bird that is rockin' in three states ( 5 ) 

Information was gathered from the 1999 World Almanac 



( 6 ) 




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o5T\5b 


















(V° 



e ^ 



U.S. Facts and Figures 




Acroas 

2. This town in California is the lowest town in 
the U.S — 185 feet below sea level. 

;j. The longest river in the United States runs 
north and south. 

6. The northernmost city in the United States 
is located in Alaska. 

9. The easternmost city in the United States 
is located in Maine. 

11. The largest state in the United States is 
also the northernmost state. 

12. The deepest lake in the United States is 
found in Oregon. 

l;t. The highest bridge in the United Status is 
located in Colorado 



Down 

1. The highest mountain in the United States 
is located in Alaska. 

2. This town in Colorado is the highest town in 
the United States — 11,560 feet. 

4. The smallest state in the United States is 
on the East Coast. 

5. The tallest building in the United States is 
located in Chicago. 

7. The lowest point in the United States is in 
the most-populated state. 

8. The westernmost city in the United States 
is located in Alaska. 

13. The southernmost city in the United States 
is located in Hawaii. 




Used with permission from Wisconsin Dept, of Public Instruction, “1999 Summer Library Program Manual based on the theme. 
Go Global: Read!”, PP 165 & 194. 



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U.S. FACTS AND FIGURES 




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AMERICA 
CHINA 
DOMINECO 
KING JOHN 
NINA 

SANTA MARIA 

SPAIN 

VISION 



ATLANTIC OCEAN 

COURAGE 

GENOA 

MAPMAKER 

PINTA 

QUEEN ISABELLA 
KING FERDINAND 
CHRISTOPER COLUMBUS 
GLOBE 



BARTHOLOMEW 

DISCOVERY 

HOUR GLASS 

MARTIN PINZON 

PORTUGAL 

SAILORS 

SHIPS 

WEST 



Used with permission from the Tennessee State Library and Archives, 1999 Tennessee Summer Reading Program Manual based 
on the theme, "The Great Time Machine ”, P. 100. 



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PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTS | 



WORD SEARCH ANSWERS 
(ADVANCED) 




AMERICA 
CHINA 
DOMINECO 
KING JOHN 
NINA 

SANTA MARIA 

SPAIN 

VISION 



ATLANTIC OCEAN 

COURAGE 

GENOA 

MAPMAKER 

PINTA 

QUEEN ISABELLA 
KING FERDINAND 
CHRISTOPER COLUMBUS 
GLOBE 



BARTHOLOMEW 
DISCOVERY 
HOUR GLASS 
MARTIN PINZON 
PORTUGAL 
SAILORS 
SHIPS 
WEST 



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Title of Program: 



Naval Vessels 



Contributor: Susan Heckler Pittman 

St. Marys Community Public Library 
St Marys, Ohio 



Age: Primary, Intermediate 
Length: Varies 



Program Description: Find the following words located in this word search about the various types of ships. 
Look in all directions and circle the words. 



BATTLESHIP 

BLOCKSHIP 

CARRIER 

CONVOY 

CRUISER 

CUTTER 



DESTROYER 

FIREBOAT 

FLAGSHIP 

FRIGATE 

GUNBOAT 

IRONSIDES 



MINISUB 

MONITOR 

SUBMARINE 

SWEEPER 

TANKER 

WARSHIP 



F 

I 

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B 

0 

A 

T 

N 

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I 

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A 

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Used with permission from 1998 “Drop Anchor in a Good Book ", State Library of Ohio, P. 183-184. 




198 



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Naval Vessels Answer Sheet 



BATTLESHIP 

BLOCKSHIP 

CARRIER 

CONVOY 

CRUISER 

CUTTER 



DESTROYER 

FIREBOAT 

FLAGSHIP 

FRIGATE 

GUNBOAT 

IRONSIDES 



MINISUB 

MONITOR 

SUBMARINE 

SWEEPER 

TANKER 

WARSHIP 




k[e 

1 N 

E E P E R 



257 





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PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTSl 



I? 



’-NO’ ^ 



C\ro 



< o ^° 0 






<JU2o 



American Sign Language 



Practice the alphabet below, then decipher this message. 





Sign Language Alphabet 




Used with permission from the Wisconsin Dept, of Public Instruction, “1999 Summer Reading Program Manual based on the 
thetae, Go Global: Read!'\ P. 180 




\ READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTS 1 



0 o no t 
o v o o 



i? 



°\3 






^2T\£) 



C 7VO 












<JU2r> 



American Sign Language 



Practice the alphabet below, then decipher this message. 




H_ _£ & Q. 



Sign Language Alphabet 





Usfcd with permission from the Wisconsin Dept, of Public Instruction, *‘1999 Summer Reading Program Manual based on the 
thepie, Go Global: Read T\ P. 180 



201 259 




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PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTS I 



t? s 



• •* ns> 



CTV© 









cW2n 



Create Your Own Postcard 

Use this pattern to create your own postcard. On this side, write to 
someone about a place you visited. On the back side, color a picture 
of a place you have visited or make a collage from magazine pictures. 
When you are finished, cut around the outside edges. 







Used with permission from the Wisconsin Dept, of Public Instruction, “1999 Summer Library Program Manual based on the 
irtieme, Go Global: Read!”, P 182. 

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Bald is Beautiful 

Find a book that has photographs or colored drawings of the Bald Eagle. From the pictures you 
should be able to color a life like portrait of the Haliaeetus Leucocephalus. The bald eagle’s 
coloration is dark brown, with white head and tail. The distinctive white head and tail appear 
when the bird is about four years old. At maturity this bald official emblem of the United States 
will be 31-37 inches long. 




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Dance Program 



Summary: 

Young Adults participate in any of a number of kinds of dance classes. Styles reflect the 
many kinds of dance in America such as ballroom, folkdance, ballet, square dancing, modem 
dancing, line dancing, etc. This could include the national dances of various immigrant 
groups such as Hispanic, African, Irish, etc. 



Procedure: 

1. Presenters can be teachers at local studios, square dance callers, folk dance leaders, 
performers, etc. 

2. This could be a one-time program or a series of programs. 

3. Allow 1-1/4 hours for each class / program. Content and format could include historical 
background as well as a demonstration and teaching of certain dance steps or positions. A 
video which complements the style being presented Could also be shown, if available. 

4. Display books on different types of dance both to create interest for the program and to 
encourage further reading and exposure to the various dances. 



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PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTS 



Bird Program 



Summary: 

Young Adults can learn about local birds and their importance. 



Procedure: 

1. Invite a local naturalist or someone associated with a local birding group to speak about 
birds of the area. Inquire as to the feasibility of accompanying members on a bird count. 

2. Invite a local nature artist to give a how-to workshop on drawing / sketching birds and 
other wildlife. This could be a series of workshops covering different mediums and 
subjects. 



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Music Program 



Summary: 

Some music is unique to America. Young Adults will have the opportunity to hear some of 
that music and learn about it’s historical significance. 



Procedure: 

1. Contact local musicians who are representative of various American music forms such as 
jazz, bluegrass, spirituals, and country and see if they would do a program / concert. 

2. Contact local teen musicians who are representative of various American music forms. 
Hold a jam session for teens. 

3. Feature some of the famous past American song writers / musicians such as Woody 
Guthrie in an informational program followed by an activity in which participants write new 
words to a favorite tune. 



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Theme: BEACH 



BOOKS: Aliki. THOSE SUMMERS. Harper Collins, 1996. 

Asch, Frank. SAND CAKE. Parents Mag., 1978. 

Axelrod, Amy. PIGS ON A BLANKET. S & S, 1996. 

Brown, Marc. D.W. ALL WET. Little, 1988. 

Brown, Margaret Wise. SEASHORE NOISY BOOK. Harper Collins, 1993. 
Carle, Eric. HOUSE FOR HERMIT CRAB. Picture Book Studio, 1987. 
Cocca-Leffler, Maryann. CLAMS ALL YEAR. Boyds Mills, 1996. 

Dexter, Alison. GRANDMA. Harper Collins, 1992. 

Gebert, Warren. THE OLD BALL AND THE SEA. Bradbury, 1988. 
Graham, Bob. GREETINGS FROM SANDY BEACH. Kane Miller, 1992. 
Levine, Evan. NOT THE PIANO, MRS. MEDLEY! Orchard, 1991. 
Oxenbury, Helen. TOM AND PIPPO AT THE BEACH. Candle wick, 1993. 
Raffi. DOWN BY THE BAY. Crown, 1990. 

Robbins, Ken. BEACH DAYS. Viking, 1987. 

Rockwell, Anne. AT THE BEACH. Macmillan, 1987. 

Turkle, Brinton. DO NOT OPEN. Dutton, 1981. 

Wild, Margaret. THE QUEEN’S HOLIDAY. Orchard, 1992. 

Zion, Gene. HARRY BY THE SEA. Harper, 1965. 



POEMS: THE SHELL by David McCord (in THE STAR IN THE PAIL, Little Brown, 1975). 



AT THE SEASIDE by Robert Louis Stevenson 

When I was down beside the sea 
A wooden spade they gave to me 
to dig the sandy shore. 

My holes were empty like a cup, 

In every hole the sea came up, 

Till it could come no more. 




Used with permission from”1998 Books Ahoy!”, Vermont Department of Libraries, P. 109-110. 



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Pourquoi Tales 

Plan a day around folktales that tell why (pourquoi something is so. 

You may invite the help of older students to provide variations in the presentations. 

Story-telling with or without a book, reader's theater and short plays are possibilities. 

For some stories you can enlist audience members to serve as impromptu actors. 

The list of books provided here will get you off to a good start. 

Books 

Aardenia, Verna (reteller). Why Mosquitoes Buzz in Peoples Ears. Penguin, 1992 (West Africa) Ahenakew, 
Freda (translator). How the Birch Tree Got It's Stripes. Fifth House, 1988 (Cree) 

Grifalconi, Ann (reteller). The Village of Round and Square Houses. Little, Brown, 1986 (Cameroon) Kipling, 
Rudyard (reteller). Just So Stories. Many editions available (International origins) 

Mora, Francisco X. (reteller). The Legend of the Two Moons. Highsmith, 1992 (Mexico) 

Stevens, Janet (reteller). How the Manx Cat Lost Its Tale. Harcourt, 1990 (Isle of Man) 

Tavlor, Harriet (reteller). Coyote and the Laughing Butterflies. Macmillan, 1995 (Native American) 

Troughton, Joanna (reteller). How Rabbit Stole the Fire. Bedrick, 1986 (Native American) 




Scenes in African American Life, Past and Present 

Ages: Adapt for preschool through upper grades 

Acknowledge the difficult history that is a part of African American Heritage. Recognize the contribution of 
black leaders and role models locally and in the nation. In the books listed below you will find examples both 
of cultural differences and of experiences shared by children and families of all colors. 

You may choose to begin the day with an invited guest who can talk about Juneteenth Day and Kwanza or a 
guest who can introduce the pleasures of jazz through performance or through recordings. A program devoted 
to jazz could make a fine family evening event. 



Books-Heritage 

Chocolate, Debbi. Rente Colors. Walker, 1996 

Kente cloth, with its symbolic colors, was made traditionally in Ghana and Togo. It was worn only 
by royalty at one time, but now it is the national costume of Ghana. The art of the weaving was 
handed down from one generation to another 

Greenfield, Eloise. Honey I Love. Harper, 1995 

The words from a poem form the basis for the narrative describing all the things, that are loved in 
the course of one day. 

Grimes, Nikki. It 's Raining Laughter. Dial, 1997 

Twelve poems are paired with pictures of African American children. Some poems celebrate the love 
and pride of African American names. One celebrates the joy a brown-skinned child takes in seeing 
pictures of children like her in books at the. Library. The book acknowledges the importance of self- 
esteem, joy, and laughter. 

Higginsen, Vy. This Is My Song: A Collection of Gospel Music for the Family. Crown, 1995 

With a written introduction to the genre, 30 gospel songs are included in this collection. Notation 
for each song is given along with a brief explanation of the context in which it was wntten. 

Hudson, Cheryl. Bright Eyes , Brown Skin. Just Us, 1990 

Hudson offers a celebration of the skin tones and physical characteristics of African American children. 



Used with permission from the Wisconsin Dept of Public Instruction, “1999 Summer Library Program Manual” based on 
the theme, Go Global: Read\ , pp. 87-92. ’ 



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Hudson, Wade, and Cheryl Hudson. How Sweet the Sound: African-American Songs for Children. 
Scholastic, 1995. 

This collection of 23 songs from African American tradition includes illustrations representing elements of 
that heritage. A brief history is provided for each song and notation is included at the end of the book. 

Johnson, James Weldon. Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing. Scholastic, 1995 

The words to the African American anthem are paired with ethnocentric illustrations. 

Jones, Maurice. Say It Loud: The Story of Rap Music. Millbrook, 1994 

Jones traces the evolution of rap music from oral traditions in Africa to the United States in the time of 
bondage and to the present day. Information on performers is included. 

Monceaux, Morgan, Jazz . My Music, My People. Knopf, 1994 

Biographies and portraits of the people who made jazz great are presented together with explanations of 
musical styles. 

Myers, Walter. Brown Angels: An Album of Pictures and Verse. Harper, 1993 

Myers presents a collection of pictures of African American babies and children with text validating their 
beauty and worth. 

Myers, Walter. Harlem: A Poem. Scholastic, 1997 

The history of Harlem is traced, showing it as a welcoming place, a gathering place of Black faces and 
voices and rhythms. 

Raschka, Chris. Charlie Parker Played Be Bop. Orchard, 1992 

The rhythm of bebop infuses the text of this tribute to the famous saxophonist, Charlie Parker. 

Slier, Deborah, ed. Make a Joyful Sound: Poems for Children by African-American Poets. Checkerboard, 1991 
Topics such as family, friends, playing outside, school, and pride, in African American heritage are included 
in this collection. 

Strickland, Dorothy, and Michael Strickland. Families: Poems Celebrating the African American Experience. 
Boyds Mills, 1994 

Each page features families with a text that assures children the world is wide open to them. 

Thomas, Joyce. Brown Honey in Broomwheat Tea. Harper, 1991 

Twelve poems express feelings of pride, joy, wonder, and sorrow of everyday African American life. 

Walter, Mildred. Ty's One-Man Band. Scholastic, 1980 

Ty meets a man using a washboard, comb, spoon, and pail to create music, and together they fill the night, 
with music. 

Weiss, George and Bob Thiele. What a Wonderful World. Atheneum, 1995 

Six children prepare scenery and props for a puppet show using the words to the song "What A Wonderful 
World," made famous by Louis Armstrong. Try showing the colorful illustrations, by Ashley Bryan as you 
play an Armstrong recording of the song. 



Books-Times Past 

Belton, Sandra. Maynaise Sandwiches & Sunshine Tea. Four Winds, 1994 

The friendship between two African American girls of different social classes is told as a child remembers 
the stories her grandmother told her. 



O 

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Used with permission from the Wisconsin Dept of Public Instruction, “1999 Summer Library Program Manual” based on 
the theme, Go Global: Read \ , pp. 87-92. 



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Crews, Donald. Bigmama's. Green willow, 1991 

In the 1940s the author and his family made annual trips to Florida to spend the summer on his 
Grandparent’s farm. This experience of going South or “down home” during the summer was common 
for African American families. All children will understand the excitement felt by the children in 
the story as they explore the house, bam, and yard to see that everything is as they remembered it. 

Crews, Donald. Shortcut. Greenwillow, 1992 

While visiting their grandmother, seven children decide to take a dangerous shortcut. They walk 
along a railroad track, and as they cross a bridge they hear the whistle of an approaching train. They 
cannot outrun the train and the train cannot stop, but the children manage to slide, down a steep 
embankment to escape death. 

Howard, Elizabeth. Aunt Flossie's Hats (And Crab Cakes Later). Clarion, 1991 

Great Aunt Flossie has kept every hat she has ever owned and they remind her of stories, which she tells her 
grandnieces. 

Howard, Elizabeth. Mac & Marie & the Train Toss Surprise. Four Winds, 1993 

An African American brother and sister wait anxiously for the train to pass by their house because their 
Uncle Clem works on the train and has promised to toss a surprise package off the train as it goes past. 

Howard, Elizabeth. Papa Tells Chita a Story. Simon & Schuster, 1995 

Papa begins to tell Chita his adventures during the Spanish American War, but she soon realizes that the 
parts about his fight with the snake and the alligator and his spending, the night in an eagle's nest are tall 
tales. 

Howard, Elizabeth. The Train to Lulu's. Aladdin, 1994 

Two young African American girls travel for the first time alone on a train to visit their grandmother. 

Howard, Elizabeth. What's in Aunt Mary's Room ? Clarion, 1996 

Two girls are interested in a locked room at their great Aunt’s house. Together they go into the room to find 
the family Bible to have their names inscribed. 

McKissack, Patricia. Ma Dear’s Aprons. Atheneum, 1997 

Based on real events in the life of McKissack’s great-grandmother, this story tells how David Eark call tell 
what day it is by the apron his mother is wearing. Each day she wears a different apron suited to the work 
she has to do that day. The loving relationship between this working mother and her son is expressed in the 
activities they share. 

Medearis, Angela. Picking Peas for a Penny. Scholastic, 1990 

This is the story of a young Black girl growing up on a farm during the 1930’s Depression. Her family has 
little money, but they do have love for each other. 

Miles, Calvin. Calvin's Christmas Wish. Viking, 1993 

As the family prepares for Christmas in the 1950s, Calvin wishes for a new bicycle. But he knows that his 
loving African American family is more important than all the material things in the world. 

Miller, William. Zora Hurston and the Chinaberry Tree. Lee and Low, 1994 

Author Zora Hurston was encouraged by her mother to think the world belonged to her and that she could 
succeed at the things she enjoyed. 

Mitchell, Margaree. Uncle Jed's Barbershop. Simon & Schuster, 1993 

The narrator's Uncle Jed lost the money he was saving to open his own barbershop during the Depression. 
Finally, at 79 he opened his shop and all the people who had known him came for the opening 



Used with permission from the Wisconsin Dept of Public Instruction, “1999 Summer Library Program Manual” based on 
the theme, Go Global: Read\ , pp. 87-92. 

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Pinkney, Gloria. Back Home. Dial, 1992 

Family heritage, memory, and family ties are shown as an African American family welcomes a little girl 
when she comes from the city to visit her rural relatives in the 1950’s. 

Pinkney, Gloria. The Sunday Outing. Dial, 1994 

Eight-year-old Ernestine and her Aunt Odessa share all interest in trains and adventures. In an effort to keep 
in touch with extended family members and to pass along family traditions, Ernestine is being prepared to 
make a long train trip to her relatives in the South. The story is set it the 1950’s 

Rochelle, Belinda. When Jo Louis Won the Title. Houghton Mifflin, 1994 

Jo Louis dreads her first day at a new school because everyone makes fun of her name. But her grandfather 
tells Jo about how he arrived in Harlem on the same day that Joe Louis won his boxing title. He helps Jo 
understand the story and reason behind her name. 

Stroud, Bettye. Down Home at Miss Dessa's. Lee and Low, 1996 

In the 1940s, two sisters decide that they must change roles and take care of Miss Dessa, who has always 
cared for them. A strong sense of being a good neighbor is conveyed. 

Thomas, Joyce. Gingerbread Days. Harper, 1995 

An African American boy learns who he is as he moves through the calendar year. His place as a beloved 
son and grandson is secure. 

Williams, Sherle. Working Cotton. Harcourt, 1992 

The events in the life of a Black migrant family who worked long hours picking cotton are recounted. 

Woodtor, Dee. Big Meeting. Atheneum, 1996. 

The simple joys of a large family reunion capture events rich in emotion and memory. 



Books-Contemporary Life 

Barber. Barbara. Allie’s Basketball Dream. Lee and Low, 1996 

A young girl is given a basketball by her father and dreams of becoming a professional player. She is 
spirited and determined and eventually makes her first basket despite teasing from a group of boys. 

Barber, Barbara. Saturday At The New You . Lee and Low, 1994 

Every Saturday Shauna goes with her mother to the beauty parlor her mother owns. She helps her mother set 
up for the day, sorts curlers, brings magazines to customers, and braids her dolls hair. The strength of the 
African American neighborhood and hard-working women are celebrated. 

Bunting, Eve. Smoky Night. Harcourt, 1994 

A young African American boy and his mother leave their apartment in the middle of the night to seek 
refuge in a shelter during a riot. The multicultural neighborhood gathers at the shelter, and the tension 
between the African American and Korean American families is described. 

Chocolate, Debbi. On the Day I Was Born. Scholastic, 1995 

An African American family blends ancient African traditions-such as holding a baby up to the heavens and 
presenting the baby with kofia and kente cloth-with modem American practices, as they welcome a new 
family member. 

Crews, Nina. One Hot Summer Day. Greenwillow, 1995 

A young girl chooses to play outdoors on a very hot day. The temperature seems to control everything, until 
a cool rain breaks the heat 



Used with permission from the Wisconsin Dept of Public Instruction, “1999 Summer Library Program Manual” based on 
the theme, Go Global: Read \ , pp. 87-92. 



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PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTS 



Cummings, Pat. Clean Your Room, Harvey Moon ! Bradbury, 1991 

When Harvey settles in to watch television on Saturday morning, he hears the "Voice Of Doom" telling him 
to 

clean his room. 



DeGross, Monalisa. Donavan's Word Jar. Harper, 1994 

Third-grader Donavan Allen collects words and puts them into a jar once he has written them down and 
learned them. His family helps him think of the perfect solution when his word jar is full. 

Derby, Sally. My Steps. Lee and Low, 1996 

A young girl describes all the fun she and her friends have on the front stoop of her house in a busy city 
neighborhood. 

Fluomoy, Valerie. Tanya's Reunion. Dial, 1995 

Tanya goes early to a family reunion with her grandmother to the family farm her grandmother has often 
described to her. 



Garland, Sarah. Billy and Belle. Viking, 1992 

Billy is asked to take his little sister Belle with him on the day that his parents go to the hospital for the birth 
of their new baby. It is pet day at school, and Belle finds a spider she can take. 



Gilchrist, Jan. Indigo and Moonlight Gold. Black Butterfly, 1993 

A special bond exists between the young girl and her mother in this book. The daughter wishes she could 
keep the stars she sees from the porch forever and keep her mother watching from the window. But she 
knows that although life will change, her mother's love will always be with her. 



Greenfield, Eloise. First Pink Light. Black Butterfly, 1991 

Four-year-old Tyree refuses to go to bed because he wants to wait up and surprise his father by jumping out 
of a cardboard box. His mother agrees to let him stay up if he sits in a rocking chair and wait for the pink 
light of dawn. 



Greenfield, Eloise. William and the Good Old Days. Harper, 1993 

William knows that life has changed for him and his grandmother now that she is in a wheelchair. He 
remembers when she owned the neighborhood diner: how she fixed good food and how she was loved. 

Haseley, Dennis. Crosby. Harcourt, 1996 

Crosby seems to be a lonely child who takes little interest or pleasure in the people and events around him. 
But one day he shares the joy of flying the kite he has made by teaching a younger child how to fly it. The 
sharing seems to open both children to new possibilities. 

Havill, Juanita. Jamaica's Find. Houghton Mifflin, 1986 

Jamaica finds a stuffed dog at the park one day and decides to take it home. 

Heath, Amy. Sofie's Role. Four Winds, 1992 

Sofie goes to the bakery with her parents to help out on the day before Christmas. She packs orders, answers 
the phone, and even waits on a few customers. 



Hort, Lenny. How Many Stars in the Sky? Tambourine, 1991 

A little boy goes out into the backyard in his pajamas to count the stars, but there are too many and they 
keep moving. They are hard to see because of the city lights, so his father takes him out into the country to 
watch. 



0 

ERJC 



Used with permission from the Wisconsin Dept of Public Instruction, “1999 Summer Library Program Manual” based on 
the theme. Go Global: Read\ , pp. 87-92. 

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Hudson, Wade. / Love My Family. Scholastic, 1993 

An African American family has a joyous reunion with dancing, singing, good food, and posing for a family 
picture. 

Hudson, Wade. Jamal’s Busy Day. Just Us, 1996 

Jamal is a child who takes school very seriously because he knows that going to school is his "job.” He 
works hard all day attending meetings, doing research, and assisting his supervision all things his parents 
describe about their careers as an architect and accountant. 

Hru, Dakari. The Magic Moonberry Jump Ropes. Dial, 1996 

Two girls are frustrated when their friends are not available to play double-Dutch jump rope and their sister 
is too young to turn the ropes. Their uncle tells them he has brought magic ropes from Tanzania that can 
grant wishes. The girls wish for a third jumper comes true when a new family moves in next door. But the 
girls wonder if the ropes are really magic. 

Jackson, Isaac. Somebody’ s New Pajamas. Dial, 1996 

When two African American boys from different backgrounds become friends and sleep over at each other’s 
homes, they exchange ideas about sleepwear as well as about family life. 

Johnson, Angela. Daddy Calls Me Man. Orchard, 1997 

A young African American boy is featured in four vignettes with his loving family. 

Johnson, Angela. Joshua’s Night Whispers. Orchard, 1994 

Joshua is a little uncomfortable at night when the wind brings whispers into the room. He goes down the hall 
to find Daddy so they can listen to the night whispers together. (Board book format) 

Johnson, Angela. One of Three. Orchard, 1991 

The youngest of three sisters enjoys the things the three do together, but she resents being left behind when 
the two older girls say she is too young to join them. Her parents make her feel like ’’one of three” again 
when they include her in their activities. 

Keats, Ezra. A Letter to Amy. Harper, 1968 

Peter wants to surprise Amy with an invitation to his birthday party so he mails her a letter. 

McKissack, Patricia. A Million Fish ... More or Less. Knopf, 1992 

Inspired by the fish tales he has heard from Papa-Daddy and Elder Abbajon, Hugh Thomas makes up his 
own fish story as he walks home from a day of fishing. 

Miller, William. A House by the River. Lee and Low, 1997 

During a summer storm, Belinda and her mother climb to the attic to wait out the flooding. Belinda doesn’t 
like the house by the river until her mother explains how hard her father worked to buy it, contrasting that 
with her great-grandfather's hard work as a slave. 

Oppenheim, Shulamith. Fireflies for Nathan. Tambourine, 1994 

When 6-year-old Nathan is visiting his grandparents, he enjoys hearing stories about his father, especially 
that his father liked fireflies because Nathan likes them, too. 

Peterson, Jeanne. My Mama Sings. Harper, 1994 

A young boy is worried when his mother loses her job and can’t sing because she is so sad. He imagines a 
song he wants to sing to cheer her. 

Pilkey, Dav. The Paperboy. Orchard, 1996 

A boy delivers papers on his bike early in the morning before anyone else is awake. As he rides, dawn 
comes in bright colors. The boy and his dog return home, and the boy must pull down his window shade to 
keep out the light as he goes back to sleep. 



O 

ERJC 



Used with permission from the Wisconsin Dept of Public Instruction, 
the theme. Go Global: Read\ y pp. 87-92. 



T999 Summer Library Program Manual” based on 



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PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTS 



Pinkney, Andrea. Solo Girl. Hyperion, 1997 

Cass can’t seem to learn how to jump double-Dutch jumprope. Her brothers make a rhyme to help her 
master a single rope, but it is Cass’s own math skills that help her master double-Dutch. 

Pinkney, Andrea, and Brian Pinkney. I Smell Honey. Red Wagon, 1997 

A young girl watches as her mother prepares a meal of fried catfish, collard greens, red beans, and sweet 
potato pie. (Board book format) 

Pinkney, Andrea and Brian Pinkney. Pretty Brown Face. Red Wagon, 1997 

A baby boy and his father play an Afrocentric version of ’’Where’s your nose?” (Board book format) 

Pinkney, Andrea, and Brian Pinkney. Watch Me Dance. Red Wagon, 1997 
A big sister entertains her baby brother by dancing for him. 

Pinkney, Andrea and Brian Pinkney. Shake Shake Shake. Red Wagon, 1997 

A baby boy and his sister enjoy the sounds of two shekeres as their mother watches. A shekere is 
an African musical instrument consisting of a gourd covered with a mesh of sea shells and string. 

When shaken, the beads strike and swish against the gourd. (Board book format) 

Pinkney, Brian. The Aduentures of Sparrowboy. Simon & Schuster, 1997 

Told in comic book style, this is the story of a paperboy who fantasizes that he is a hero called Sparrowboy. 
He imagines saving children from a dog and saving a baby bird that has fallen from its nest, and he still 
manages to finish his paper route on time. 

Pinkney, Brian. Max Found Two Sticks. Simon & Schuster, 1994 

Max sits on the front steps of his apartment house and doesn’t feel like talking. As his neighbors greet him, 
he uses two sticks as drumsticks and beats out a rhythnrin response. 

Raschka, Chris. Yo\ Yes? Orchard, 1993 

Two lonely characters, one black and one white, meet on the street and become friends. 

Schertle, Alice. Down the Road. Harcourt, 1995 

Hetti is old enough to be entrusted with her first solo responsibility: to go into town, buy eggs, and 
bring them back without breaking any. She is very serious about her responsibility and does very 
well until she comes to an apple tree with ripe apples. 

Smalls-Hector, Irene. Jonathan and His Mommy. Little, Brown, 1992 

As a young boy and his mother take a walk through their neighborhood, their walk turns into hops, running, 
zigzagging, baby steps, and other fanciful steps. Their conversation matches their steps. 

Stolz, Mary. Go Fish. Harper, 1991 

Thomas and his grandfather have a strong loving relationship. They share a passion for fish: catching them, 
cooking them, eating them, and playing ”Go Fish.” 

Straight, Susan. Bear E. Bear. Hyperion, 1995 

A young girl in a mixed-race family waits for her favorite teddy bear to come out of the dryer. As she waits, 
she thinks about adventures they had together. 

Thomassie, Tynia. Mimi’s Tufu. Scholastic, 1996 

Mimi loves to watch her family in traditional dance, classes. Her grandmother has made her a 
traditional African tutu, a lapa, which she, loves to wear at the classes. 

Zolotow, Charlotte. The Old Dog. Harper, 1995 

A boy’s loving family helps him with his grief when he finds his dog has died during the night. 



Used with permission from the Wisconsin Dept of Public Instruction, “1999 Summer Library Program Manual” based on 
the theme, Go Global : Read \ , pp. 87-92. 

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SPECIAL NEEDS | 



SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN AND THE ARIZONA READING PROGRAM 

Involving Visually and Physically Handicapped Children 
in the Arizona Reading Program 



SPECIAL NEEDS INFORMATION 

Visually impaired or physically handicapped children in your community may want to participate in your 
Summer Reading Program along with their peers. The Braille and Talking Book Library can help you include 
them in your program. 

There are a few simple things you can do to help make visually impaired children more comfortable in your 
library. Identify yourself when you greet someone with a visual impairment. Let the child know what you are 
doing and where you are going. Ask if the child needs assistance getting around the library and let the child 
take your arm, which allows you to be the guide. If the child becomes loud or disruptive, do not be afraid to 
discipline him as you would a sighted child. Do not single the child out or allow inappropriate behavior because 
you feel sorry for him. Just make sure that the child knows what is acceptable and unacceptable. 

With a little help, visually impaired, blind, or otherwise handicapped children can participate in much of 
regular library programming. For story hours, select the story carefully so that understanding of the text does 
not depend upon illustrations. If the child cant see gestures, or facial expressions, try to include objects and 
tactile experiences. In some cases, if the library has volunteer helpers for story hour, the helper can sit with the 
child and help with gestures, etc. Parents may also wish to participate with their child. The storyteller can use 
hearing, touch, tasting, smelling, imagination, and emotions to encourage the listeners' interest. Visually 
impaired children also enjoy films or video if the films are introduced and given explanation when needed. 
Many children's books are printed in larger than normal print, and children who read large print may be able to 
enjoy summer reading if they are directed toward these books. Discuss the child's needs with the child and the 
parents and do not avoid words such as see, look, and read. Encourage ALL the children in your story programs 
to see with their "inside eyes" or use their imagination, as you tell stories. 

The Talking Book Library will provide the child and the librarian with catalogs of recorded juvenile books 
available through our program. There are also many books recorded locally. Many are on Arizona or 
Southwest subjects, and many are of juvenile or Young Adult interest. Our Reader Advisors may suggest some 
of these, and are available for consultation by phone. 

Our newsletter will encourage our readers to participate in their local library's summer reading program by 
using talking and Braille books. We intend to support your efforts to include these children in your programs 
and are available by phone every weekday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 1-800-255-5578 or, in the Phoenix area at 
255-5578. 



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SPECIAL NEEDS! 



Talking Book/Braille Service Overview 



What is available? 



Talking books, Braille books, and catalogs of titles; talking books are complete books recorded on cassettes or 
records. They are circulated throughout the state by the Arizona State Braille and Talking Book Library in 
cooperation with the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS), a division of 
the Library of Congress. 

The book collection is much like that of a public library; books are selected to appeal to a wide range of 
reading interests. Registered borrowers receive large print catalogs and the bimonthly Talking Book Topics or 
Braille Book Review to use in selecting books they wish to read. A separate set of catalogs list books for 
children. 

It is necessary to use the NLS playback equipment because the books are recorded at a slower speed not 
generally available on commercial equipment. Record and cassette players are loaned free of charge as long as 
library materials are being used. 

Accessories for the equipment which are available for loan include: extension levers for the cassette player; 
special amplifier for use with headphones for hearing impaired persons; remote control unit; and solar battery 
charger. 

There is no charge for any of the materials. Books and equipment are mailed to the reader and back to the 
library postage free. 



Who is eligible ? 

Anyone unable to read conventional print, hold a book, or turn pages due to a physical limitation is eligible. 
This includes blind children, children whose visual disability prevents the reading of standard print material, 
physically handicapped children unable to handle standard print material, and children having a reading 
disability resulting from an organic dysfunction of sufficient severity to prevent their reading of printed material 
in a normal manner. 

In cases of blindness, visual disability, or physical limitations, the disability may be certified and the 
application signed by doctors of medicine or osteopathy, ophthalmologists, optometrists, registered nurses, 
therapists and the professional staff of hospitals, institutions, and public or welfare agencies, or a professional 
librarian. In the case of reading disability from organic dysfunction, the application must be signed by a doctor 
of medicine or osteopathy, who may consult with colleagues in associated disciplines (such as school 
psychologists or learning disability teachers). 

For more information about eligibility and certification, contact the Arizona State Braille and Talking Book 
Library at 255-5578; outside the Phoenix area, call 1-800-255-5578. 



How does the service be sin: 

Obtain and complete an application form; eligibility must be certified before equipment can be loaned. Return 
the completed application to the Library. Equipment is sent to eligible patrons, and a Readers Advisor contacts 
each new patron to begin service, discuss reading interests, etc. 

Patrons may submit request lists; or, staff will select books for patrons in the subject areas they designate. 
When one book is returned to the library, another is sent. They may always increase or decrease the number of 
books sent, place a "hold" on service temporarily, or modify their reading interest list. 




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SPECIAL NEEDS | 



For more information, contact Linda Montgomery, Director, Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped 
Division: 



State of Arizona 

Department of Library, Archives and Public Records 
Talking Book and Braille Library 
1030 North 32nd Street 
Phoenix, AZ 85008 
(602) 255-5578 

In-State WATS: 1-800-255-5578 
FAX#: (602)255-4312 



SOME ADDITIONAL IDEAS FOR INCLUDING SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN AND TEENS 

Do not forget special needs teens when choosing teen volunteers for your programs. They may participate in 
book reviews, helping other special needs kids, book repair, or other activities. Discuss with the volunteer what 
he or she would like to do and what limitations they have. You'll find that special kids can also be special 
volunteers! 

Very young children usually need little guidance in accepting a blind child in their circle. They quickly learn to 
show him a toy, for example. Older children and adults sometimes have to be encouraged to invite a blind 
companion to join their fun. Don't assume that a disabled child cannot possibly run around or play ball. 
Children in wheel chairs or with canes can participate in many games with guidance. Blind players can bat a 
ball from a tee, or use a beeper ball. If you don’t have these mechanical devices, clapping, ringing a bell, or 
using your voice to direct the player can be used for ball games or relays. Batting in a kickball game is easy if 
the pitcher stands close in, rolls the ball carefully, and calls out when he releases the ball. The blind player can 
run to a voice calling him on each base, or run with a friend. Blind children can also be flexible in informal 
play, taking someone's arm when they are actually running. Try having blindfolded games for all players, with 
sound or touch as the guides. Tricycle races are fun for all, just make sure that the direction in which to go is 
clear, and once again have a "buddy " and or sound guides. Tug of war and rope pulls are fun for all. Playing 
as wheel barrows, creeping over obstacles, pushing wagons, weighted boxes, etc., and doing yoga exercises 
such as cat, cow, or cobra can be fun for all and give a sporty tone to your activities. 

What kinds of other activities are good for including children who cannot see or perhaps need to increase their 
grip or finger strength? Tearing paper and fabrics, squeezing water or paint from sponges or syringe medicine 
droppers, playing with play dough and bread dough, playing with manipulative toys, using paper hole punch, 
using glue sticks, tracing around cookie cutter shapes or frosting cookies, water painting with large brushes, are 
a few ideas. Blind children also enjoy large wooden or rubber puzzles and sand table activities. Simple cooking 
activities using garlic press, potato masher, stirring, sifting, etc. are easy for all young children to learn, so don’t 
exclude your visually impaired or blind child. They may need extra assistance but be sure to consult with the 
parents of the child so that you don't give too much help when it is not needed. 

To add awareness to your non-handicapped children, you may want to invite a person who has a guide or 
service dog as a companion to visit and explain its training and work. These dogs may help their owners who 
cannot hear or have mobility problems. 



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SPECIAL NEEDS | 



PARENT GUIDES 

Some parent guides your patrons might find useful to follow. 

Guide To Toys For Children Who Are Blind Or Visually Impaired, jointly produced at no cost by the 
American Foundation for the Blind and Toy Manufacturers of America (contact American Foundation for the 
Blind at (800) 232-5463. 

A Toy Guide For Differently -A bled Kids, distributed at no cost by The National Parent Network on 
Disabilities (contact National Parent Network on Disabilities, 1600 Prince St. #115, Alexandria, VA (703) 684- 
6783 (V/TDD). 

Materials For Blind Parents, available free from the National Federation of the Blind Materials Center, 1800 
Johnson St., Baltimore, MD 21230 (410) 639-9314. This last is a set of two 1-7/8 ips two-track cassettes, tone- 
indexed. 

For families with access to computer and modem, there are hundreds of resources for parents of children with 
special needs on the Local Interagency Network Communication System. This electronic bulletin board 
operates 24 hours a day. There are no registration fees. For more information, contact PHP-The Family 
Resource Center for Children with Special Needs at (408) 288-5010 (voice). 

The Foundation for Blind Children is an organization in Phoenix which has many activities during the summer, 
usually including a Braille reading program. Contact them at 1231 E. Harmont Drive, Phoenix, Arizona 
85020-3864 (602) 331-1470. 



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SPECIAL NEEDS | 



ON THE FOLLOWING PAGES are reproductions of pertinent 
materials distributed at a workshop entitled: SERVING THE 
PHYSICALLY CHALLENGED. 



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SPECIAL NEEDS | 




Sheryl L. Stewart 

Parent Information Network Specialist 
Central Arizona 

4410 W. Union Hills Drive, 7-110 
Glendale, AZ 85308 

582-1852 Pager: 519-5752 FAX: 582-9630 

Workshop for Serving Patrons with 
Physical Challenges and Other Disabilities 

Tempe Public Library, November 15, 1994 



SEVERE EMOTIONAL DISABILITIES AND BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS 



An understanding of the cause probably won't be available to you. 

Yet patience to deal with these youngsters comes from understanding their problems and their needs. 

First, know that the parents are most likely as frustrated as you are when the child behaves inappropriately and 
won’t respond to "normal” discipline. Parents are not always to blame when children exhibit severe emotional 
disabilities or behavioral disorders. 

Second, it is not a primary function of schools to teach coping and strategy skills for the real world. School staff 
hand out consequences for inappropriate behavior, but often don’t understand the source of the child’s problem. 

So, remember children who behave poorly in a library most likely behave poorly at home and at school. These 
children are identified early by families and school staff, but little is done to help them until the intermediate 
grades. These children are used to being in trouble and may be ’’immune" to typical discipline measures such 
as: 



1 . Asking the child to sit down or be quiet 

2. Diverting the child’s attention to something else 

3. Repeating warnings about what will happen if a rule is broken. 

It may help you to understand that they don’t care if they break a rule. In fact, sometimes they break rules on 
purpose, just for the joy of it, because that’s what they know how to do best. 





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SPECIAL NEEDS | 



Finally, what happens is that behavior management becomes a priority over academic learning. Soon the 
teacher is forced to focus on CONTROL, and not on teaching. After all, the child can't be allowed to disrupt the 
class or library and disturb the other children so that they cannot learn. 



Suggestions for routine problem solving: 

• Use a team approach to be proactive. 

• Teams foster pooling of experience and expertise. 

• Develop shared responsibility for successful interventions. 

• Devise a plan and implement it to provide immediate assistance for staff when the need arises. 



IT HELPS TO KNOW 

Parents and school staff alike have a rough time teaching these children social skills. 

Understand these children do not have social skills. They don't usually recognize social cues. For example, they 
don't recognize a look of annoyance on someone's face and know that this person is about ready to explode. 
They often can't tell they're being obnoxious. 

In our state cultural and language barriers further compound our difficulties in reading these children. 

They dislike change, or any kind of transition. 

Remember, these children are used to negatives. 

Often, they become angry for no apparent reason. 

If you say, "Use an inside voice, please. You're disturbing the others," it probably won't make an impact. It may 
be a waste of your breath and time. 

Often these children want to be included in a group, or participate in story hour, but they go about it all wrong. 
They're boisterous and don't wait to be asked to join. Instead, they brag about how good they are, or do 
something to call negative attention to themselves. 

These children are often suspended. They're used to not being allowed to go to school. Usually there is very 
little support for them through counseling. 

They prefer structured environments. 

They're easily distracted. What's a distraction: 

• something hanging from the ceiling 

• voices 

• music 

• noise - phones, copy machines, traffic, air conditioners 

• movement 

• decorations on the walls 

OH MY GOSH, WHAT SHOULD I DO? 

What do you do with these challenging little people when they're yelling at the top of their lungs, or jumping up 
and down during story time, or throwing books, or picking fights? 



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SPECIAL NEEDS | 



Maintain eye contact as much as possible when speaking. 

Speak in short sentences. Keep your voice even and soft. 

They're used to yelling and grumpy voices. 

Keep instructions very simple. Pause between sentences. Watch closely to see if the child is able to concentrate 
on what you're saying. 

Don't ask, "Do you understand?" They'll usually say yes, because they think they do understand. A better way 
to check for understanding is to ask, "Can you tell that back to me in your own words?" 

Use lots of visual cues when instructing. It is preferable to describe something fixed and colorful on a wall. 

"The books on dragons are under the big red balloon on the wall." (Point as you look at the balloon) 
rather than saying: "To find the books about dragons, turn left at the third row of books." 

Ask the child to accompany you to find a book. Talk to the child on the way to the shelf. 

Include these children in smaller groups rather than larger groups whenever possible. 

Announce any changes in schedule, routine, or room assignments as much in advance as possible. 

Assign the child a task to be of assistance to you whenever appropriate. "You look like a pretty smart kid to me. 
How would you like to help me take things off the bulletin board?" 

Avoid touching. Sometimes the children are tactile defensive. They may perceive a touch as a threat. 

Act cautiously when including these children in group games, or something similar to team sports, as these 
types of activities are usually overwhelming. 

Ask the child if he or she needs a quiet, alone place to calm down. 

Focus on the positive as much as possible. Instead of saying, "Please don't write in the books." Try saying, "I'm 
glad you're in the library today." (Try to look sincere!) Then ask what school the child attends. After 
developing a little rapport with the child, explain writing in books is like destroying property, not a good thing 
to do. 



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SPECIAL NEEDS] 



SUGGESTIONS ON SERVING THE DISABLED 

From: Serving the Disabled 
By: Keith C. Wright 
Judith F. Davie 



PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES: 

Do Not: 

Assume they want information about disabilities. 

Ignore the person with the disability and 

speak only to someone who is accompanying the 

disabled. 

Assume disabled people will not be interested in 
sports, exercise, sex, or any other normal activity. 

Do: 

Find out what they want and help them get what 
they need in a format they can use. 

Pay attention to the disabled individual; talk to 
them just as you would any library patron. 

Allow the individual to state his or her interest and 
help the person to find the needed information. 

PEOPLE USING A WHEELCHAIR: 

Do Not: 

Stand above the individual, constantly looking 
down on them. 

Touch or offer to push the wheelchair without 
being asked. 

Assume that all parts of the library are accessible. 

Do: 

Assume a position that will allow eye contact with 
the individual on the same level. Pull up a chair, sit 
down. 

Remember, the chair is a part of the personal space 
of the individual. Use the same manners towards 
the person's chair, crutches or cane. 

Know what parts of the library and its resources 
can be used by persons in wheelchairs and be 
ready to offer assistance by bringing materials or 



programs to the individual when necessary or 
requested. 

AN OLDER PERSON 
Do Not: 

Assume they can see and hear as well as younger 
people. 

Assume they will want large print items or 
enlarged materials. 

Assume they have an interest in health and income 
issues. 

Only allow for the normal amount of time when 
helping the person. 

Do: 

Allow for vision and hearing loss. Be prepared to 
speak up and to repeat words, if necessary. 

Remember, an individual may not wish to admit 
they have a visual or hearing problem. 

Let the individual tell you what he or she wants. 

Allow for physical impairments which may cause 
the individual to take more time to move about, 
adjust to using a device, or carry out an activity. 



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SPECIAL NEEDS | 



HEARING IMPAIRMENT: 

Do Not: 

Assume every person with a hearing loss uses 
American Sign Language. 

Speak in an exaggerated manner or much slower 
than usual so they can lip read. 

Stand in a glare where your face cannot be seen or 
obstruct the view of your mouth. 

Assume that you understand and are understood. 

Do: 

Approach the individual so he or she can see you. 
Ask if you can be of assistance. 

Speak normally or a bit slower and be prepared to 
repeat that is said or write it on a piece of paper. 

Keep hands, glasses, and other objects away from 
your mouth while talking. When in doubt about 
meaning, write it down. 



VISUAL DISABILITY: 

Do Not: 

Assume that the individual knows his or her way 
around the library. 

Imagine that the person can see the expression on 
your face. 

Put your hand out to shake hands or touch the 
person without being asked to do so. 

Touch or pet a seeing eye dog, even if the dog 
"begs" for attention. 

Assume he or she will want to use your special 
reading machine for the blind or the talking book 
service. 



Do: 

Approach the individual so that you are facing him 
or her and ask if you can be of assistance. 



Make sure your attitude can be heard in your 
voice. Put a smile, welcome, and helpfulness in 
your voice. 

If the individual asks to be guided to a particular 
area, stand next to or slightly ahead of the person 
and ask him or her to take your arm. 

Be aware of the dog and the requirement that room 
will need to be made for the dog in hallways, 
library stacks and at tables. 

Find out what the individual wants. If a special 
machine seems appropriate, suggest it or any other 
special services. 



224 



234 



Parent Infonnation Network 



Purpose of PALS (Parents Are Liaisons to Schools) 



Aethre parent Involvement with schools benefits student parformanca. Parent participatlan Is needed 
for team decisions in special education meetings which makes it avan mere important lor parents to 
ba Involved with their child's school. The bast parent-school relationships are built on a foundation 
of mutual respect and trust. 

Slnca parents are often consldsrad as “consumers" of special education services, parent Input is 
needed at the state level prior to finalizing the state special education plan. In 1988, In an effort to 
Increase parent Involvement In Arizona's schools, the Arizona Department of Education/Spectal 
Education Section (AOEfSES) formed a steering committee of parents called PALS. The goals for 
PALS Include: 

♦ providing ADETSES with feedback on special education issues from parents In their district; 

♦ providing assistance and support to other PALS members; 

♦ updating local parents and special education directors regarding information AOEiSES 
provides, including legislation, funding, atC4 

♦ encouraging parents to bacotno aware of tha legislative process as an avenue of change; 

♦ networking with their special education director following PALS meetings regarding PALS 
Initiatives and action plans; and 

♦ working with their local district to increase parent Involvement at all levels. 



How PALS Representatives Ara Selected 

The Arizona Department of Education/S pedal Education Section, identifies schools with ongoing 
parent Involvement and requests those districts to n om i na te parents WttBng to work whh ADE/3E3 
staff and regional Parent Information Network Specialists (PINS). The focus is to work toward 
Increased parent Involvement statewide. From the nominations received, PALS members ara selected 
to represent parents of students In special education. To balance the representation, consideration 
is given to parents of various age students and disabilities, ethnicity and geographic region. 



Role of PIN Specialists 



PIN (Parent Information Network) Specialists were Initially hired by the AOE/SES In March 1991, as part 
of a pilot protect, to serve es liaisons between the PALS and parents from schools In their region, and 
the state. The pilot project later became an intagrai component of the Parent Information Network. 
Another role of the PIN Specialists is to provide parents with requested Information on relevant special 
education issues. PINS are intended to ba the “connection* between parents, the ADE/SES and 
districts, for relaying information on timely issues, training needs, etc. They are availabla as regional 
contacts for other parents by: 

♦ providing general assistance to local parents and school administrators; 

♦ eschanging information on _ 

• status reports for current legislation and proposed legislation 

• local or regional resources, services and other allied organizations; and 

♦ assisting to establish or strengthen local parent support groups or 
special education advisory committees. 




285 BEST COPY AVAILABLE 



MRCNf IWf ORMA1ION WE rWOflK |P||4| 





Parent Mormation Network 

Arizona Deoapmwu of FHnrarinn 

Special Education 




Amons Oipinmim of Ed u coa o n • C, OUim Bishop, Suoonraonom o l Put&c Ummcoon • S o mm oo r 10M 





BEST COPY AVAILABLE 



Thin m« s§ Ini Iw motIcm iindti^ iilnAiiioni. 



Ibook a trip to the stars 



SPECIAL NEEDS | 



Mainstreaming Special Needs Children 
in the Public Library 

A Bibliography 



Basu, S.G. Public Library Services to Visually Disabled Children. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland, 1991. 

Dalton, Phyllis I. Library Service to the Deaf and Hearing Impaired. Phoenix, Arizona: Oryx Press, 1985. 

Dolnick, Edward. Deafness as Culture. Atlantic Monthly. (September, 1993, pp. 37-53.) 

High/Low Handbook: Encouraging Literacy in the 1990's , 3rd ed. New York: R.R. Bowker, 1990. 

"Libraries Serving and Underserved Population: Deaf and Hearing-Impaired Patron ", Library Trends 
(Summer 1992). 

Richey, Cynthia K. Programming for Serving Children with Special Needs., Chicago, ALA, 1993. (12pp). 

Walling, Linda Lucas and Marilyn H. Karrenbrock. Disabilities ; Children, and Libraries: Mainstreaming 
Services in Public Libraries and School Library Media Centers , Englewood, Colorado. Libraries Unlimited, 
1993. 



BEST COPY AVAILABLE 

287 

227 



RESOURCES IN AREA LIBRARIES FOR THE PHYSICALLY CHALLENGED 




MARICOPA 

COMMUNITY 

COLLEGES* 


S3 

>■ 


* 

CO 

W 

>- 


YES* 


NO 


NO 


NO 


ON 


YES/GGC 


NO 


YES/PVC 


ASU 


ON 


YES 


YES 


NO 


YES 


YES 


YES 


YES 


YES 


YES 


TEMPE 

350-5511 


YES 


YES 


NO 


NO 


YES 


YES 


NO 


YES 


YES 


NO 


SCOTTSDALE* 

994-2476 


YES 


YES 


YES 


NO 


YES 


NO 


NO 


NO 


YES 


NO 


PHOENIX* 

262-4766 


YES 


YES 


YES 


YES 


YES 


YES 


YES 


YES 


YES 


NO 


MESA* 

644-2207 


YES 


NO 


NO 


NO 


YES 


YES 


YES 


NO 


NO 


ON 


MARICOPA 

COUNTY 

605-4789 


YES 


YES 


YES 


YES 


YES 


YES 


YES 


NO 


NO 


NO 


GLENDALE* 

435-4901 

435-4801 


YES 


YES 


YES 


NO 


YES 


NO 


NO 


YES 


NO 


NO 


GILBERT 

892-3141 


YES 


YES 


NO 


ON 


YES 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


CHANDLER 

786-2310 


YES 


YES 


ON 


ON 


YES 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 




LARGE 

PRINT 


BOOKS ON 
TAPE 


CLOSED 

CAPTION 

VIDEOS 


DESCRIBED 

VIDEOS 


TDD 

PUBLIC USE 


SCREEN 

ENLARGER 

PAC 


PAC VOICE 
SYNTHESIZE 
R 


KURZWEIL 


BRAILLE 


OPTILEC 



CD 

CO 

cv 



CO 

CO 

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SPECIAL NEEDS] 








DEAF 

CULTURE 







Many people in this country consider deafness not a physical condition but an ethnic identity. Those who accept this 
identity view 'themselves as belonging to a proud and distinctive subcultural group known as the deaf community. 
Composed of people, who use sign language as their primary means of communication, the deaf community has over 
the past 150 years developed a rich social life and folklore. Through their own efforts to meet their own needs, deaf 
people have organized a nationwide and international network of social, religious, athletic, dramatic scholarly, and 
literary organizations serving local, national, and international memberships. Every four years, for example, the 
World Games for the Deaf (the Deaf Olympics) brings together deaf athletes from many countries to compete for 
international prizes. 



Like any true subcultural group, the deaf community 
adheres to certain particular social norms and values 
which are passed from generation to generation. 
Unlike other subcultural groups, however, the deaf 
community recruits its members in a unique fashion. 
In general, human culture is passed down within 
families. But because 90% of deaf children have two 
hearing parents, only a minority of deaf community 
members acquire their cultural identity and distinctive 
social skills at home. Most deaf children learn about 
the deaf subculture in schools for the deaf, from other 
children, teachers, and houseparents. Nonetheless, the 
deaf community is quite cohesive, with a high 
percentage of members marrying within the group. 

A number of people have begun to study deaf folklore 
and folklife. They have collected jokes, legends, 
games, riddles, etc., based on sign language and the 
experiences of deaf people. In addition, linguists have 
isolated some of the characteristics and values of deaf 
culture. The following list outlines some of these 
characteristics. 

1. Membership is based on deafness. Members have 
little or no hearing and define themselves as deaf. 

2. There is a heavy emphasis on vision. American 
Sign Language, a visual mode of communication, 
is the language used within the deaf community. 
Members gain the vast majority of their 
information through their eyes and make a point 
of observing closely what is happening around 
them. 



3. There is a specific set of social norms. Members 
follow certain social habits that are somewhat 
different from the general society. Among these 
are the following: 

a Members do not geneally use their 
voices with deaf friends, but will with 
hearing persons. In fact, many members 
of the deaf community dissociate 
themselves from speech. 

b Members will wave, tap, or throw a 
small piece of paper to attract a person’s 
attention. 

c Members will talk (i.e., sign) with food 
in their mouths. 

d Members use a variety of devices to 
replace ordinary alrm clocks, door bells, 
telephones, fire alarms, etc. 

4. Members place a strong emphasis on fostering 
and maintaining social ties within the 
community. 

The accepted form of etiquette within the deaf 
community is slightly different from that of the 
hearing community. Deaf culture, for example, has no 
prohibition against staring because it is necessary for 
effective sign communication. The hearing culture, 
however, considers staring to be rude. 

Research on the deaf community, its values, mores, 
and folklore, is in its infancy. Several social scientists 
are presently working to develop a more detailed and 
accurate picture of this distinctive way of life. 



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SPECIAL NEEDS 



SPECIAL ELECTRONIC DEVICES 

Many kinds of helpful devices have been developed for people who have hearing problems. The most commonly 
used ones are described below: 

• Hearing Aids: Hearing aids are miniature electronic amplifiers that can help a great number of people 
with hearing problems. They work by increasing and controlling sound intensity and by expanding the 
range of tones a person hears. 

• Signaling Devices: These devices give off light or vibrations to alert people to the presence of sound. To 
deaf people they are a substitute for hearing sound. For example, people with severe hearing loss use 
alarm clocks with flashing lights or vibrators attached. Flashing lights can also alert a deaf person to the 
ringing of the telephone or doorbell, to the sound of the smoke detector, or to the cry of a baby. 

• TDD’s: A TDD is a “telecommunication device for the deaf." TDD's have a keyboard similar to a 
typewriter or computer. They can be used to communicate over the telephone with anyone else who has a 
TDD. This communication device is becoming more and more widespread. The TDD enables deaf people 
to call airlines, hotels, many stores and businesses, and even their representatives in Congress. TDD's are 
also used by many hospitals, police departments, and other emergency services. 

• Telecaption Decoders: Special decoding equipment that will generate words on a television screen can 
be attached to any TV. The words that appear on the screen are called captions. If a television program is 
"closed captioned," it means that you must have a special telecaption decoder in order to see the words. 
Not all television programs are captioned, but the number of hours of “closed captioned” programming is 
steadily increasing. 



JOB SKILLS OF DEAF WORKERS 

Deaf adults can do any kind of job except those jobs that are primarily dependent on hearing sounds. Aside from 
jobs like telephone operator, piano tuner, or opera singer, deaf people can and do work in nearly every kind of job 
today. Deaf people have become doctors, dentists, nurses, lawyers, machine operators, printers, scientists, business 
executives, computer programmers, writers, editors, psychologists, teachers and mathematicians. In addition to these 
areas, deaf people are employed in many other fields. The U.S. Federal Government is the largest single employer of 
deaf persons. 



COMPLIMENTS OF: 

Arizona Council For The Hearing Impaired 
1400 West Washington 1st Floor 
Phoenix, Arizona 85007 
Tele: (602) 542-3323 Voice/TTY 
520 area code (800) 352-8161 



Printed with permission of The New Book of Knowledge , Grolier Incorporated 



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SPECIAL NEEDS | 



DEAFNESS 



D 

E 

A 

F 

N 

E 

S 

S 



Some people are bom deaf. They cannot hear their friends’ voices, the birds singing, or 
beautiful music. They are not frightened by loud thunder or a dog barking. Since they 
cannot hear human speech, deaf people have difficulty learning to understand spoken 
language and to speak well themselves. 

Approximately 16 million Americans are Hearing impaired, that is, they have some 
degree of hearing loss. People who are hearing impaired may be either deaf or hard of 
hearing. Deafness refers to a degree of hearing loss that makes it difficult or 
impossible for a person to understand speech. Hard of hearing refers to people who 
have a moderate or severe hearing loss but are usually able to understand speech. 



WHAT CAUSES DEAFNESS? 

People can develop or be born with a hearing impairment. A variety of causes can 
create this condition. Five of the major causes of deafness and hearing loss are 
described below. 

• Birth Defects: An infant's hearing can be damaged even before birth. An 
example of this is deafness caused by the mother contracting certain diseases 
such as German measles (also called rubella) during her pregnancy. An 
expectant mother's dependence on chemical substances (drugs, for example) can 
also damage or destroy her baby's hearing. 

• Injury or Noise: A severe blow to the head or exposure to excessive noise can 
physically damage hearing structures. Research has shown that even loud music 
can damage hearing. Some warning signs that the music you are listening to is 
too loud are; you have to raise your voice to be heard; you cannot hear someone 
less than two feet away from you; speech area, or you have pain or ringing in 
your cars after exposure to the music. 

• Disease: Childhood diseases such as measles, mumps, and chicken pox can 
cause hearing loss. Infection, accompanied by high fever, can damage the 
hearing at any age. 

• Heredity: Certain inherited characteristics can make a person more susceptible 
to diseases and defects that affect the ear and the ability to hear. Deaf parents are 
somewhat more likely to give birth to deaf children, 

• Aging: "Presbycusis is the term used to describe the progressive deterioration of 
hearing in older people. It is a natural part of the body’s aging process. But just 
as some people get gray hair more slowly than others, some individuals may feel 
the effects of Presbycusis later and less severely than others. 



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EXCHANGE SITES 

State TTY Distribution Program/State Loaned TTYs 



Apache Junction 

Apache Junction Police Department 
1001 N. Idaho Road. 85219 
Communications -Sgt. Schultz 
(602)982-8260 

Casa Grande 

Casa Grande Police Department 
520 N. Marshall, 85222 
Steve Cantrell 
(520)421-8700 

Cottonwood 

Cottonwood Police Department 
816 N. Main Street, 86326 
Roseanne Jackson 
(520)634-4246 

Chandler 

Chandler Police Depanment 

250, E. Commonwealth Avenue, 85225 

Front Desk 

(602)786-2569 

Flagstaff 

Flagstaff Police Department 
120 N. Beaver, 86001 
John Fairchild 
(520)556-2313 

Globe 

Globe Emergency Services 
1400 E Ash, 85501 
Mariano Gonzalez , Jr. 

(520)425-3231 

Holbrook 

Navajo County Complex 
Highway 77 South, 86025 
Lt. Clark 
(520)524-4050 

Kingman 

Kingman Police Department 
2730 E. Andy Devine, 86401 
Muriel Campbell 
(520)753-2191 



Lake Havasu 

Lake Havasu Police Department 
2360 McCulloch Boulevard, 86403 
Wayne Adams 
(520)855-1171 

Mesa 

Mesa Police Department 
130 N. Robson, 85201 
Front Desk 
(602)644-2324 

Overguard 

Navajo County Sheriffs Office 
2055-A Lumber Valley Road, 85933 
Lt. Clark 

(520)535-4616 Contact Holbrook site 

Page 

Page Police Department 
547 Vista Avenue, 86040 
Louise 

(520)645-2463 

Payson 

Payson Police Department 
303 N. Beeline Highway, 85541 
Della Bradley 
(520)474-5177 

Phoenix - North 

Scottsdale Police Department 
9065 East Via Linda, 85258 
Gail Denny 
(602)391-5669 

Phoenix-Central 

Council for the Hearing Impaired 
1400 W. Washington, Rm 126, 85007 
(602)542-3323 



Phoenix-West 

West Phoenix Fire District 
4010 N. 63rd Ave., 85033 
Frances 
(602)262-7589 



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COMPLIMENTS OF THE ARIZONA COUNCIL FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED 



ASSISTIVE LISTENING DEVICES-SYSTEMS RESOURCES 

Note: This is not a comprehensive list. If your organization distributes ALDS and is not listed, please contact ACHI. 



METRO PHOENIX 



A.S.U. SPEECH & HEARING CLINIC 
(FM Systems) 

Tempe, 85287-0102 
965-2373V 

ABILITY COMMUNICATIONS 
(Various Devices, TTY Paper, Novelty Items, Books) 
P.O. Box 6659 Glendale, 85312-6659 
800-700-9695 V-TTY 
602-412-3272 V-TTY 

CIGNA HEARING CENTERS: 

13041 N. Del Webb Blvd., Sun City, 85351 
876-2101 V-876-2199 TTY 



1111S. Stapley Dr., Mesa, 85204 
464-6870 V — 464-6877 TTY (Showroom) 



6811 E. Superstition Springs, Mesa, 85208 



641-4000 
DOV TECH 



(Various Devices TTY Repair) 

1245 W. Guadalupe, Ste. B6-289 Mesa, 85202 
777-2628 TTY 777-2627 Fax 

EAST VALLEY HEARING CENTERS: 



(Various Devices) 

6744 E. Broadway, Ste. C5, Mesa, 85206 
830-0994 V 



2058 S. Dobson, Ste. 9, Mesa, 85202 
730-6024 V 

JC PENNY CATALOG 
(Phone Devices) 

800-527-7889 TTY or 800-222-6161 

RADIO SHACK STORES 
(Phone Devices) 




SEARS HARING AID SYSTEM CENTERS 
(Various Devices) 

Fiest Mall, 1425 W. Southern, Mesa 85202 
649-8474 V 

Los Arcos Mall 1313 N. Scottsdale, 85257 
840-0038 V 



Paradise Valley Mall, 4604 E. Cactus, Phx. 85032 
953-1422 V 



TUCSON 

CAROL CROUSE 

5161 W. Monte Carlo Dr., Tucson, 85745 
8848-9557 V-TTY 

HEARING BY ELECTRONICS 
(Sam & Carol Alimena) 

4201 Crestview Rd., Tucson, 85745 
743-0900 V-TTY 

RADIO SHACK STORES 
(Phone Devices) 




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SPECIAL NEEDS 



Call your closest site for information and directions or call 
ACHI for more training. 



Prescott 

Police Department 
2221 South Marina, 86303 
Lt. Benner 
(520)778-1444 

Safford 

Safford Police Department 
523 10th Avenue, 85546 
Teresa Bigler 
(520)428-3141 
(520)428-2487 

Show Low 

Show Low Police Department 

(520)537-5091 

150 N. 6th Street, 85901 

Virginia Young 

(520)537-8346 Fax 



Sierra Vista 

Sierra Vista Police Department 
91 1 N. Coronado, 85635 
Susan Mercier 
(520)458-3311 
(520)458-3563 Fax 

St. Johns 

County Sheriffs Office 

370 South Washington Street, 85936 

Matrese Avila 

(520)337-4321 

Tempe 

Tempe Police Department 
120 East 5th Street, 85281 
Karen Allen 
(602)966-6211 



Tucson-North 

Oro Valley Police Department 
1 1000 N. LaCanada Drive, 85737 
Maggie Williams 
(520)742-5474 



Tucson-Central 

270 S. Stone Avenue, 85701 
Tom Daeffler 
(520)791-5351 



Tucson-South 

Pima County Sheriff Office 
(520)741-4777 

1750 E. Benson Highway, 85714 
Katherine Poulsen 



Wickenburg 

Wickenburg Police Department 
155 N. Tegner Street, 85390 
(520)684-3152 

Winslow 

Winslow Police Department 
215 Taylor, 86047 
Mary Ann Smith 
(520)289-2091 

Yuma 

Yuma Police Department 
1500 South 1st Avenue, 85364 
Robin Gross 
(520)343-8810 



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WHERE TO ORDER ASSISTIVE DEVICE CATALOGS 



Assistive Communication 
7346 S. Alton Way, Suite E. 


LS & S Group 


Englewood, CO 80112 


P.O. Box 673 


(800) 859-8331 TTY-V 


Northbrook, EL 60065 


General Technologies 


(800) 468-4789 V 
(800) 317-8533 TTY 


7415 Winding Way 
Fair Oaks, CA 95628-6701 


Soundbytes 


(800) 328-6684 TTY-V 


(800) 667-1777 TTY-V 


HARC Mercantile, LTD. 
3130 Portage Street 


htto://www. soundbvtes.com 
Sound Involvment 


P.O. Box 3055 


6529 Colerain Ave., Suite A 


Kalamazoo, MI 49003-305 


Cincinnati, OH 45329 


(800) 445-9968 V 


(800) 443-2353 V 


(800)413-5245 TTY 
Harris Communications, Inc. 


Williams Sound Corporation 
10399 W. 70th St. 


6541 City West Parkway 


Eden Prairie, MN 55233-3459 


Eden Prairie, MN 55344-3248 


(800) 328-6190 


(800) 825-6758 V 
(800) 825-9187 TTY 


Wilner-Greene Associates, Inc. 


Hal-Hen Company, Inc. 


449 Forest Avenue Plaza 
Portland, ME 04101 


35-53 24th Street 


(800) 634-4327 


Long Island, NY 11106 
(800) 242-5436 V 

HEAR-MORE, Inc. 
P.O.Box 3413 
Farmingdale, NY 11735 
(800) 881-4327 V-TTY 

HITEC 
8160 Madison 
Burr Ridge, EL 60521 
(800) 288-8303 V-TTY 

Potomac Technology, Inc. 
One Church Street Suite 402 
Rockville, MD 20850 
(800) 433-2838 V 







**This is not a conclusive listing 

**Compliments of the Arizona Council for the Hearing Impaired 



235 

29G 





1-800-367-8939 [TTY/ASCII) 
1-800-842-4681 (Voice) 
1-800-842-2088 (Spanish-TTY/Voice) 
1-800-842-6520 (Speech to Speech) 
1-900-346-3323 (900 Services) 



24 hour Customer Service 
1-800-676-3777 TTY/Voice 
1-877-877-3291 FAX 

297 E-Mail 

ERIC SPRINT.TRSCUSTSERV@MAIL.SPRINT.COM 





SPECIAL NEEDS 



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ARIZONA DIRECTORY 
OF 

SIGN LANGUAGE/ORAL 
INTERPRETERS 

INTERPRETER REFERRAL SERVICES 
COMMUNICATION ASSISTIVE DEVICES 

1995/96 



This directory is provided by the Arizona Council for the Hearing Impaired as a public 
service. The Council claims no responsibility for the services rendered by individuals listed 
within. Our intent is to provide the public a current resource listing of sign language/oral 
interpreters and communication aids for the deaf and hard of hearing in Arizona. 



For additional directories call 1-800-352-8161. 

This publication is funded by the Governor’s 10% Discretionary Program. 




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SPECIAL NEEDS 


CONTENTS 

INTRODUCTION 


2 


DEFINITION OF A PERSON WHO IS DEAF 
OR HARD OF HEARING 


3 


WHAT ARE AUXILIARY AIDS? 


4 


HOW TO DETERMINE THE COMMUNICATION 
NEEDED 


4 


WHY AN INTERPRETER IS IMPORTANT 


5 


USING AN INTERPRETER FOR 
THE FIRST TIME 


6 


GUIDELINES ON USING AN 
INTERPRETER 


7 


DEFINITION OF A QUALIFIED 
INTERPRETER 


8 


STANDARDS OF ETHICAL BEHAVIOR 
FOR PROFESSIONAL INTERPRETERS 


12 


RECOMMENDED SITUATIONS FOR 
ASSIGNMENT OF INTERPRETERS 


13 


WHERE TO FIND INTERPRETERS 


16 


COMMUNICATION DEVICES 


,25 


ARIZONA STATE LAW 


26 


FEDERAL LAW 


27 


RESOURCES FOR AUXILIARY AIDS 


28 


APPENDIX A. B 


29 



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SPECIAL NEEDS | 




WHERE TO FIND INTERPRETERS 



Interpreters that are certified or rated at different skill levels live throughout the state of Arizona. Typically, 
there are more interpreters available in the metropolitan area than in rural areas. Some interpreters may not 
have a certificate or rating but have experience and can provide interpreting service depending on their skill 
and knowledge. For rural areas, ask the deaf person if they know someone who will be able to interpret, then 
call that person to set up an appointment. Do not ask the deaf person to bring the interpreter. State agencies 
are advised to use the state interpreting contract and contact the contractors as listed in Appendix A. 

INTERPRETER REFERRAL SERVICES 



PHOENIX 



TUCSON 



(602) 595-9515 voice 
(602)595-9516 TTY 
(602) 239-1820 pager 



Freelance Interpreting Service 



Community Outreach Program 
for the Deaf 
(520) 791-1906 TTY/V 
(800) 234-0344 



Statewide Interpreting Sevice 
(602) 973-8072 TTY V 
(602) 590-3919 pager 



Sign Language Services 
(520) 792-9525 TTY/V 
(520) 793-2326 Pager 



Valley Center of the Deaf 
(602) 267-1921 TTY/V 
Day and 24-hour emergency 





300 



ERIC 



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SPECIAL NEEDS 



ARIZONA STATE LAW 



CHAPTER 17.1 

COUNCIL FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED 
Section 

36- 1941. Establishment of council; membership; appointments; terms; meetings; 

compensation; definitions. 

37- 1942. Executive secretary; duties. 

36-1943. Duties. 

36-1944. Repealed. 

36-1945. Gifts and donations; annual report. 

36-1946. Interpreters for the deaf; duties of council. 

36-1947. Telecommunication devices for the deaf and the hearing and speech 

and speech impaired; administration; fund. 



Chapter 17.1 , consisting of Article 7, §36-1941 to 36-1945 , was added by Laws 1977, Ch. 171, § 18, effective 
August 27, 1977. 



Laws 1985, Ch. 96, § 1 substituted ’’Council for the Hearing Impaired” for ’’Council for the Deaf’ as 
the heading for this chapter. 



§36-1946. Interpreters for the deaf; duties of council 

The council shall approve certificates of competency issued by any public or private organization or institution 
which the council finds meets standards necessary to achieve the purpose of §12-242. Added by Laws 1982, 
Ch. 258, §3. 



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FEDERAL LAW 



Federal Law and Regulations that Prescribe the Accommodations of Interpreter Services that Shall be 
Made by Recipients of Direct or Indirect Federal Financial Assistance: 

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, 29 U.S.C. 79 provides that: 

"...no otherwise qualified handicapped individual in the United States shall, solely by reason of their handicap, 
be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any 
program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance." 

Sign Language Interpreters are specifically mandated as an accommodation pursuant to Section 504, 28 
C.F.R. Part 42, Subpart G. Any entity having questions or needing assistance regarding compliance with 
Section 504 and the Regulations may contact the Civil Rights office in San Francisco, California. 



AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) 

This is a federal law which stops discrimination against people with disabilities. It applies to: 

• private and public employer (Title I) 

• state and local government agencies (Title II) 

• places of public accommodations (Title III) 

• telephone companies (Title IV) 

For individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing they must provide "auxiliary aids and services" to ensure 
effective communication. The Department of Justice lists various types of auxiliary aids as: 

Qualified interpreters, notetakers, computer-aided transcription services, telephone handset amplifiers, assistive 
listening systems, closed caption decoders, TDDs and other methods that make aurally delivered materials 
available to individuals with hearing impairments. 28 C.F.R. 35.104; 28 C.F.R. 36-3.3 (b)(1). 

It is not possible to list every possible auxiliary aid or service. The most important thing to consider is what the 
person needs in order to communicate effectively in a particular situation. 




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APPENDIX A 



STATE CONTRACT FOR SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETING SERVICES 

The contractor shall provide qualified sign language interpreters to the State of Arizona. A qualified interpreter 
is defined as "an interpreter who is able to interpret effectively, accurately and impartially both receptively and 
expressively using any necessary specialized vocabulary". Services shall be provided by all State Agencies, 
boards and commissions within the State of Arizona, as well as all eligible political subdivisions. 

For questions regarding the state contract, contact Susan Bayer, State Procurement office at (602) 542- 
5511. 

CONTRACTOR: 

No. A5 -0036-001 
Catholic Community Services 
Marie Tavormina 
TWO LOCATIONS: 

TUCSON: COPD 
(520) 792-1906 

PHOENIX: VCD 
(620) 267-1921 

No. A5 -003 6-002 
Freelance Interpreting Service 
Scottsdale: (480) 991-7587 

No. A5-0036-003 
Sign Language Services 
Tucson: (520) 792-9525 



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APPENDIX B 

ARIZONA RELAY SERVICE 

800-347-1695 FOR TTY CALLERS 
800-896-3686 VOICE CALLERS 

The Arizona Relay Service (AZARS) provides 24-hour, 7 days a week telecommunication access between TTY 
and non-TTY users. All calls are strictly confidential. Conversations are read and/or typed word for word. 



HOW TO USE THE ARIZONA RELAY SERVICE 

1. Dial the 1-800 number. The Communication Assistant (CA) will answer with their ID NUMBER. After the 
CA responds, give the phone number of the party you wish to call. You can provide the name of the party 
you wish to call, no other information is required. After the connection is made, everything is said and read, 
including comments, background noises, etc. 

2. For first time users, the CA will explain how to use the relay service. 

3. For Long Distance Calls, the charges are billed directly to your phone number unless you ask the CA to bill 
it differently. 

4. The relay service offers Voice Carry Over (VCO) for individuals who are hard of hearing and prefer to speak 
for themselves, and Hearing Carry Over (HCO) for hearing individuals who have a speech disability. 

5. For more information about the Arizona Relay Service which is operated by MCI contact customer service at 
800-347-1695 TTY or 800-896-3638 Voice. 



CONVERSATION ETIQUETTE 



GA 



Go to SK 



SKSK 



When one person is typing, the other reads. When you are finished 
typing and want the other to respond, you type GA 

To say good-bye and allow the other person to say any last words 
before ending the conversation 

To end the conversation, type SKSK 



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SPECIAL NEEDS 



INTRODUCTION 

This directory serves as a reference for businesses, organizations, institutions, agencies and service providers 
needing interpreter services or auxiliary aids to communicate with people who are deaf or hard of hearing. 
People who are deaf or hard of hearing require what is called Auxiliary Aids to communicate effectively in 
matters concerning legal, financial, employment, medical or other situations. 



This directory will assist the user by: 



1 . Defining deaf and hard of hearing 

4. Identify Auxiliary Aids and where to obtain them 

2. Identifying where interpreting services can be obtained 

3. Listing qualifications and levels of certification 

5. Referencing state and federal laws 



This directory is compiled, published and distributed free by the Arizona Council for the Hearing Impaired, an 
information and referral agency according to A.R.S. 36-1943 to 36-1 945. 



ARIZONA COUNCIL FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED 

1400 WEST WASHINGTON 

PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85007 

602/542-3323 

1-800-352-81 61 

in AZ only 



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SPECIAL NEEDS 



SEA TO SHINING SEA, SUMMER READING PROGRAM, 2000 

FICTION 

Adler, C. S. Carly’s Buck. Published: 1987. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. RC 27836. Female Reader: 
Mullen, Anne. 

Carly, angry with her father for remaining aloof as her mother died of cancer, has left Los Angeles and gone to live 
with her aunt and uncle in a small town in the Adirondack Mountains. There with Chet, her neighbor and classmate, 
she sees a family of deer close up and is awed by their beauty. She decides that she must save "her deer" during the 
upcoming hunting season. Grades 6-9. 

Aliki. Those Summers. Published: 1996. Juvenile Short. Level: P-2. RC 43608. Female Reader: Toren, Suzanne. 
A tone poem describes an extended family’s summers at the seashore sharing a big shady house. The children spend 
their days playing at the beach, there evenings on the boardwalk, and rainy days reading and playing games. For 
preschool-grade 2. 

Armer, Laura Adams. Waterless Mountain. Published: 1931. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. MoreTBNs. RC 16608. 
Male Reader: Bateman, Dennis. 

A poetic story of a contemporary Navajo boy in training as a Medicine Priest. His years of training in the ancient 
religion bring him many adventures: he guides some engineers to water on Waterless Mountain; he rescues a white 
boy lost in a sandstorm; and he finds ancient treasures hidden in a cave by his ancestors. For grades 5-8. Newbery, 
Medal. 

Armstrong, Jennifer. The Dreams of Mairhe Mehan (#1). Published: 1996. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 6- 
9. RC 43472. Avail: (Azla) 5. Female Reader: Schraf, Kimberly. 

The tragic tale of an Irish immigrant family in Washington, D.C., during the Civil War. When her beloved brother 
enlists in the union army, Mairhe schemes to purchase his release from service. As the war takes its toll, Mairhe 
experiences an epiphany that changes her life. For grades 6-9 and older readers. 

Baker, Betty. Latki and The Lightning Lizard. Published: 1979. AZC 01422. Juvenile Short. Level: 2. Female 
Reader: Miller, Shirley. 

A resourceful young girl rescues her older sister from the magical lightning lizard with the aid of an eagle, a lion, 
and an ant. Grades 2-4. 

Battle-Lavert, Gwendolyn. Off To School. Published: 1995. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. RC 42495. Female 
Reader: Mccurty Ali, Camille. 

Wezielee wants to go to school, but she has to wait until harvest is over. Her whole family helps her sharecropper 
parents, and now its Wezielee’s turn to cook. But because her mind wanders to thoughts of school, Wezielee keeps 
ruining the lunchtime meals. For grades K-3. 

Beatty, Patricia. Something To Shout About. Published: 1976. Juvenile. Level: 5-8. RC 16031. Female Reader: 
Johnson, Kathi. 

RC —The town fathers of a fledgling gold-mining town in Montana Territory set aside a refurbished chicken coop 
for the town school. The women of the community, outraged by the decision, raid the town's thirty-eight saloons to 
collect money for a real school. A rollicking story based on fact. For grades 5-8. 

Beatty, Patricia. Turn Homeward, Hannalee. Published: 1989. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. RC 
30937. Female Reader: Cundiff, Kerry. 

The life of twelve-year-old Hannalee Reed, a mill worker in Georgia, has been drastically altered by the Civil War. 
Her father has died, and her brother Davie is off fighting in Virginia. Then Sherman's men overrun her hometown, 
burn the textile mill, and ship the workers North. Hannalee, her ten-year-old brother Jem, and Dave’s sweetheart 
Rosellen are among them. But Hannalee is determined to make her way home again. Grades 6-9. 



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Blume, Judy. Just As Long As We're Together. Published: 1987. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. More 
TBNS. RC 27474. Female Reader: Byrd, Carolyn. 

Stephanie, age 12 and on the verge of entering junior high, has just moved into a new house closer to her long-time 
best friend Melanie, while her father is on the West Coast on what she believes is an extended business trip. When 
Stephanie learns the truth about her fathers absence, she becomes depressed and bitter, gets fat, and attempts to hide 
her family's problems. Grades 6-9. 

Boutis, Victoria. Looking Out. Published: 1988. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. RC 33733. Female 
Reader: Giannarelli, Laura. 

Ellen Gerson’s family has a secret that no one in her small mill town of Fairmore Hills, PA., knows about yet. 
Maybe if Ellen wears a poodle skirt and carries a notebook with Eddie Fisher on the cover and makes friends with 
Judy Dean, the most popular girl in school, no one will suspect that her parents belong to the Communist Party. Her 
parents are protesting the imprisonment of Julius and Ethell Rosenburg. For grades 6-9. Jane Addams award. 

Branscum, Robbie. The Saving of P. S. Published: 1977. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC12291. Female Reader: 
Rae, Mary. 

A spunky Arkansas girl who does not want her widowed preacher father to marry a city woman uses all the dirty 
tricks she can think of to sour their love. Grades 5-8. 

Buchanan, Ken. This House Is Made Of Mud. Published: 1991. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. AZCO 1813. Female 
Reader: Brock, Lois. 

A family builds an adobe house in the southwestern desert. K-3. 

Bums, Olive Ann. Cold Sassy Tree. Published: 1984. Adult, Young Adult Long. More TBNS. RC 391 12. Avail: 
(AZIA) 6. Male Reader: Bateman, Dennis. 

Just three weeks after granny’s death, Will Tweedy’s grandpa marries the pretty, thirtieths town milliner, Miss Love 
Simpson. It’s 1906 and the town of cold sassy, Georgia, is shocked. Fourteen-year-old Will takes it all in his 
grandpa’s rejuvenation and cold sassy’s reaction-while he experiences some major life changes of his own. RRCD 
RD23090. For high school and older readers. 

Buss, Fran. Leeper Journey of the Sparrows. Published: 1991. Adult, Young Adult Short. RC 39970. Female 
Reader: Komom, Sharon Lauve. 

Life in El Salvador was unbearable for the Acosta family after papa, and daughter Julia’s, husband were killed. So 
while mama and the baby hide in Mexico, fifteen-year-old Maria, Julia, their little brother, and a stranger flee to the 
states nailed in a crate on the back of a truck. Because this is illegal, they have to be very careful. But with the help 
of kind people, they begin a new life in Chicago. For high school and older readers. 

Byars, Betsy (Cromer). The House of Wings. Published: 1972. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. More TBNS. 

RC 41134. Male Reader: Askey, Bob. 

Sammy is horrified when his parents decide to leave him with his grandfather until they settle in Detroit. His 
grandfather is weird and Sammy hates him. But as they care for an injured crane together, Sammy learns to respect 
and love the old man. For grades 5-8. Rerecord, of RD 6090. 

Champion, Joyce. Emily And Alice (HI) Published: 1993. Juvenile Short. Level: P-2. RC 41390. Female Reader: 
Cundiff, Kerry. 

Emily looks out the window and sees a new family moving in. Best of all, they have a little girl with long black hair 
and pink sandals! But as Emily runs over to meet her, she begins to worry. What if the new girl doesn’t want a friend 
with red hair and striped knee socks? Prequel to’Emily and Alice again’ (RC41391). For preschool-grade 2. 

Chin, Frank. Donald Duk. Published: 1991. Adult, Young Adult Short. RC 34553. Male Reader: Stratton, John. 
Twelve-year-old, Donald Duk , hates his cartoon name and his Chinese- American heritage, preferring to envision 
himself as the tap-dancing Fred Astaire. As Chinese New Year approaches, with constant reminders of his culture, 
Donald dreams about his ancestors working on the railroads. The truths he learns from the dreams and his father’s 
lectures give Donald a history very different from the one taught in his private school. For high school and older 
readers. 




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Clapp, Patricia. The Tamarack Tree. Published: 1986. Young Adult, Juvenile.Short. Level: 6-9. RC 27838. 

Avail: (AZIA) 5. Female Reader: Baltes, Joan. 

At thirteen, Rosemary Leigh comes from England to Vicksburg, Mississippi, where four years she enjoys the life of 
a Southern Belle. When union forces besiege Vicksburg in 1863, She starts a diary telling of her life in the south, 
the conflict between love for her southern friends and Her moral outrage against slavery, and the hardships of the 
siege. For grades 6-9. 

Cleary, Beverly. Henry Huggins. Published: 1990. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. MoreTBNS. RC 35642. Avail: 
(AZIA) 4. Female Reader: Buzzard, Madelyn. 

A tonsillectomy and a broken arm are the most exciting things in Henry Huggins' life until a hungry old mutt begs 
for Henry's ice cream cone and a home. For grades 3-5. RRCD RD8130. 

Cleary, Beverly. Ramona Forever. Published: 1984. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. MoreTBNS. RC 23106. 

Female Reader: Buzzard, Madelyn. 

Ramona Quimby's year in 3rd grade is filled with discoveries and two surprises— one of them very big and the other 
very little! To share with older readers 3-6. 

Cleaver, Vera & Bill Dust Of The Earth Published: 1975. Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. RC 11959. Female 
Reader: Cire, Barbara. 

Fourteen-year-old Fern tells the story of her cantankerous family move to a farm they inherit in the badlands of 
South Dakota. For grades 6-9 as well as older readers. 

Coville, Bruce. How l Survived My Summer Vacation. Published: 1988. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. RC 45727. 
Male Reader: Tipton, Gary. 

When Stuart Glassman, 11, sees an ad for Camp Haunted Hills, he begs his parents to let him go. But when the time 
arrives, Stuart begins to reconsider his decision. Stuart is even more disturbed after he arrives and meets Robert 
Campbell, a counselor from 1941, who just happens to walk through things. For grades 3-6. 

Creech, Sharon. Walk Two Moons Published: 1994. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. MoreTBNS. RC 39621. Female 
Reader: Pardee, Martha Harmon. 

A year ago, Sal's grieving mother left Sal and her father to visit Idaho and never returned. Sal's father has accepted 
that his wife is not coming back, but Sal has not. As she and her grandparents’ travel to Idaho to find her mother, 
Sal tells them an extensively strange story about her new friend Phoebe, whose mother also disappeared. Sal gets to 
walk two moons in her mother's moccasins. Grades 3-6 and older readers. Newbery medal winner. 

Cross, Gillian. The Great American Elephant Chase. Published: 1993. Young Adult Juvenile. Level: 5-8. RC 
36814. Female Reader: Dulaski, Ilona. 

America, 1881. Fifteen-year-old Tad Hawkins, a lonely orphan, is thrilled when showman and huckster Michael 
Keenan brings an elephant named Khush to town, and hires him to care for Khush. When Keenan is killed in a 
railway accident, his daughter, Cissie, persuades Tad to help her take Khush across the country to Nebraska. Two 
unsavory characters that claim they bought the elephant before Keenan died pursue Tad and Cissie. Grades 5-8 and 
older readers. 

Cummings, Priscilla. Chadwick and The Garple gr ungen. (#2). Published: 1987. Juvenile Short. Level: P-2. RC 
27962. Female Reader: Buzzard, Madelyn. 

Although Chadwick enjoys being a star at the Baltimore Aquarium, when he gets a letter from his friends in the 
Chesapeake Bay telling him that Matilda the egret and the entire bluefish patrol have fallen ill. He goes home at 
once. It seems as if the Garplegrungen (pollution) that people have been dumping into the bay is about to make 
everyone sick unless Chadwick and his friends can find a way to save the bay. For Preschool-grade 2. 



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Dalgliesh, Alicethe. The Bears On Hemlock Mountain Published: 1952. Juvenile Short. Level: 2-4. MoreTBNS. 
RC 40773. Male Reader: Horton, John. 

Jonathan's mother has invited twenty members of the family for dinner, and she needs to borrow a big iron pot from 
Aunt Emma, who lives on the other side of Hemlock Mountain. Although his mother says there are no bears on 
Hemlock Mountain, Jonathan is not sure he wants to go over the mountain alone to get the pot. When darkness falls 
and the animals come out of the forest, Jonathan learns to be brave. For grades 2-4. Rerecord, of RD 6249. 

Defelice, Cynthia. Lostmans River. Published: 1994. Juvenile Short Violence. Level: 5-8. RC 46744. Male 
Reader: Sandvold, Erik. 

When Tyler MacCauley agrees to guide the naturalist, Mr. Strawbridge, to find samples of the everglades wildlife in 
1906, he is looking forward to the money he will earn for his mother. Tyler knows about the dangers from alligators, 
but it turns out that humans pose a worse threat. Some violence. For grades 5-8. 

Demuth, Patricia. Joel, Growing up A Farm Man. Published: 1982. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 22127. Male 
Reader: Brewster, Carl. 

A year in the life of Thirteen-year-old Joel Holland, an Illinois farmboy whose skills are already those of a man. 
Learning from his father and his older brothers Joel cares for livestock, repairs machinery, and harvests crops on the 
land that his great-great-grandfather bought in 1860. For grades 4-7 and older readers. 

Dorris, Michael. Guests. Published: 1994. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. RC 40769. Male Reader: Moore, Bob. 
Moss, a Native American boy, is annoyed with his father for inviting strangers to the village harvest festival. Then 
he meets trouble, a runaway girl who is also unhappy about the rules she is expected to follow. Moss dashes into the 
forest to spend some away time, but after he thinks about how he feels and what is expected of him, he decides to 
join the celebration. Still asking questions, he begins to listen for answers. For grades 3-6. 

Estes, Eleanor. The Moffats. Published: 1941. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. MoreTBNS. RC 22178. Female 
Reader: Dorflinger, Phyllis. 

The humorous adventures of the Moffat children and their mother on new Dollar Street in Cranbury, Conn. It’s 
strange that the Moffats should live on new dollar street because they don’t have much money. But the four children 
enjoy lively adventures with their family and friends. A classic story for grades 3-6 to share with older readers. 
Rerecord of TB 1022. 

Fahrmann, Willi. The Long Journey of Lukas B. Published: 1985. Adult, Young Adult. Level: J&S. RC 24263. 
Male Reader: Wieck, Randy. 

In the 1870s, Fourteen-year-old Lukas leaves his Prussian Village to go to America with his grandfather Friedrich, a 
master carpenter, and his crew. They hope to make their fortunesand then return home. En route Lukas learns that 
his father, a painter who mysteriously disappeared, may be in America also. Easy reading for junior and senior high 
readers and adults. 

Fast, Howard Melvin. April Morning, A Novel. Published: 1961. Young Adult Short. Level: J&S. MoreTBNS. 
RC 43072. Avail:(AZIA) 10. Male Reader: Tipton, Gary. 

The story of Lexington and Concord, related by fifteen-year-old Adam Cooper. After the British shoot down his 
father, Adam joins the Colonial militia at Lexington in their ambush of British regulars. For junior and senior high 
readers. 

Feiffer, Jules. The Man in the Ceiling. Published: 1993. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 39515. Male Reader: 
Stratton, John. 

Jimmy likes to draw cartoons featuring his dad as an Indiana Jones type. When his father scoffs at his attempts, 
Jimmy switches to a new hero: mini man. Mini-man draws the attention of popular Charlie at school. Jimmy is 
thrilled, but then Charlie wants to create a comic strip with Jimmy. Suddenly drawing isn’t so much fun. Meanwhile, 
Jimmy's Uncle Lester is having problems with a musical he wrote. Grades 4-7. 



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Feldman, Alan. Lucy Mastermind. Published: 1985. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. RC 25771. Female Reader: 
Dorflinger, Phyllis. 

When Lucy Heller gets inspired to do something, watch out. She’ll stuff the refrigerator with 143 fresh sunfish she’s 
caught for marmalade, her stray-cat-in-residence. Or she’ll perform alphabet "surgery" on her little brother Sam, 
who’s in special class for slow learners. Unfortunately, some of red-haired Lucy's big plans tend to backfire. Grades 
3-6. 



Fine, Anne. Flour. Babies. Published: 1994. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC 39568. Male Reader: 
Horton, John. 

The boys of room 8 at St. Boneface School are known as the sads and the bads, troublemakers and nuisances. They 
have been assigned a science project-flour babies. Each boy is to take full responsibility for a 6# bag of flour for 3 
weeks. Keeping the flour babies safe, clean, and dry proves too much for the boys, except Simon Martin. Deserted 
by his dad when he was a baby, Simon becomes attached to his charge and gains wisdom. Grades 5-8. 

Fleischman, Paul. Bull Run. Published: 1993. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC 37371. Avail: (AZI A) 
6. Male Reader: Eiland, Ted. 

A series of brief vignettes, each focusing on the life and thoughts of a person who participated in some way in the 
battle of bull run, the first major engagement of the Civil War. Each of the sixteen characters, eight from the South 
and eight from the North, has special reasons for participating: one is escaping from an abusive father, another has 
been hired to drive wealthy spectators to the battle for a picnic. Grades 5-8 and older readers. 

Gardiner, John Reynold. General Butterfingers. Published: 1986. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. RC 29419. Male 
Reader: Huntey, Bruce. 

Now that General Britt is dead, his wicked nephew Ralph is forcing everyone out of the old house on Fenton Street. 
Eleven-year-old Walter and his mother should fare all right, but what about the major, the corporal, and the private, 
three elderly war heroes who saved the general's life more than forty years ago. Will they be sent to the hated 
veteran’s hospital? Not if Walter can help it. Grades 3-6. 

Gauch, Patricia Lee. Night Talks. Published: 1983. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. RC 21767. Female 
Reader: O’conner, Lorna. 

Three well-intentioned girls from a ritzy Detroit suburb share their tent at summer camp with Margaret, a wild 
inner-city girl. The suburban girls grow to like Margaret, and when their night talks reveal a frightening secret about 
her, the about her, the other three write a letter that changes all their lives. Some strong language for grades 6-9 and 
older readers. 

George, Jean Craighead. The Talking Earth. Published: 1983. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC 23546. Female 
Reader: Hopkins, Georgia. 

Now that Billie Wind is going to school at the Kennedy Space Center, she finds it more and more difficult to 
understand the old ways of her people, the Seminole Indians. But when the tribal council sends her into the wilds of 
the Florida everglades to rethink her doubts, Billie discovers that she must listen to the earth and the animals to 
survive. Grades 5-8. 

Gilson, Jamie. 4B Goes Wild (#2 Hobie Hanson). Published: 1983. Juvenile Short. More TBNS. RC 21434. 

Male Reader: Chappell, Andy. 

As a reward for good behavior, Mr. Star’s 4th grade class receives a three day trip to Camp Trotter in Wisconsin. 
The trip holds surprises for students and teachers, including carsick and homesick campers, sequel to ” thirteen 
ways to sink a sub” for grades 4-7. 

Gilson, Jamie. Hello, My Name Is Scrambled Eggs. Published: 1985. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 23478. 

Male Reader: Regensdorf, Phil. 

Harvey’s family is helping a family of Vietnamese refugee’s settle in town. He has big plans to "Americanize” 
twelve-year-old Tuan but finds that more difficult than he expected. Grades 5-7. 



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Griese, Arnold A. The Way of Our People. No Date. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 11066. 

Unable to overcome his fear of hunting alone, a young Indian boy in the Alaskan village of Anvik tries to find other 
ways of helping his tribe. For grades 4-7. 

Griffith, Helen V. Georgia Music. Published: 1986. Juvenile Short. Level: P-2. RC 25639. Male Reader: 
Stratton, John. 

A little girl and her grandfather love to share the music they play on the mouth organ and the sounds of the birds, 
frogs, and insects of Georgia. One summer granddaddy is so ill that the family closes his cabin and brings him back 
to Baltimore to live. Granddaddy is very sad until the little girl finds a way to recreate the sounds of Georgia. 
Preschool to grade 2. 

Hansen, Joyce. Yellow Bird And Me (#2) Published: 1986. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC25876. Female Reader: 
Tessler, Yvonne Fair. 

Sixth grader Doris deeply misses her best friend Amir, who had to leave their Bronx neighborhood and move into a 
group home in upstate N.Y. They write each other, though, determined to be reunited someday. Meanwhile, 
basketball crazy yellow bird, which has special problems reading even though he's smart, keeps bugging Doris to 
help him study. Grades 4-7. 

Harvey, Brett. Immigrant Girl. Published: 1987. Juvenile Short. Level: 2-4. RC 27537. Female Reader: Toren, 
Suzanne. 

Ten-year-old Becky Moscowitz and her family move to N.Y. from Russia in 1910 to escape the terrible persecution 
of the Jews. They live above their grocery store on the lower east side, where it is much busier and noisier than her 
old neighborhood in Russia. Life is filled with exciting new experiences for Becky, who at the same time observes 
the old traditions with the help of her grandmother. Grade 2. 

Hesse, Karen. The Music of Dolphins. Published: 1996. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. MoreTBNS. RC 45591. 
Female Reader: Fox, Jill. 

The coast guard captures an adolescent girl, separating her from the dolphin family that raised her. Believing they 
rescued her, doctors name her Mila, for miracle, and try to teach her human skills. But Mila misses her dolphin 
family and longs for her home in the warm sea. She questions the wisdom of the doctors and whose life is better. 
For grade 5-8. 



Hesse, Karen. Phoenix Rising. Published: 1994. Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. RC 39951. Female Reader: Gleason, 
Marliyn. 

Nyle, thirteen, lives with her grandmother on a sheep farm in Vermont. There has been a leak at the nearby nuclear 
plant, and even though Nyle and Grandmother are safe, there are many sick people who need shelter. Nyle is upset 
when grandmother allows Ezra, fifteen, and his mother to stay in their back bedroom. Nyle calls it the dying room 
because her grandfather and mother died there. Can she allow herself to get close to someone who may die? For 
grades 6-9. 

Hobbs, Will. The Bearstone. Published: 1989. Young Adult. Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. RC 32470. 

MaleReader: Linton, J. P. 

In this coming-of-age story, Cloyd, a troubled fourteen-year-old Ute Indian, is sent to live with an elderly, recently 
widowed farmer. Exploring the hills above the ranch, Cloyd finds a small turquoise bear and gives himself a new 
name, "lone bear." Through the love of the elderly rancher and the legacy of his heritage, Cloyd ultimately succeeds 
in learning "how to live in a good way." Grades 6-9 and older readers. 

Hogan, Linda. Solar Storm. Published: 1995. Adult, Young Adult Long. RC 43726. Female Reader: Kane, 

Mary. 

Seventeen-year-old Angela Jensen returns from her Oklahoma foster home to her birthplace, a desolate Indian 
village in northern Minnesota. There she joins with four generations of Native American women on a canoe voyage 
to their ancestral canoe voyage to their ancestral homeland, which is threatened by a hydroelectric dam project. 
High school and adult readers. 

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Hooks, William H. A Flight of Dazzle Angels. Published: 1988. Young Adult Short. Level: J&S. RC 31800. 

Avail (AZIA) 7. Female Reader: Carter, June. 

In a small N.C. Town in 1908, Annie Earle, 15, is troubled with an impaired foot, a meddling aunt, and a sick 
Mother and Brother. But through her relationships with a young Black woman and a new man in town, with whom 
she falls in love, Annie gains new insight into herself and the possibilities for her life. For junior and senior high 



Hunt, Irene. Across five Aprils. Published: 1986. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. RC 26336. Male 
Reader: Wieck, Randy. 

The story of a nine-year-old boy who must take over running his family's farm during the Civil War after his 
brothers leave to fight and his father has a heart attack. Based on stories and records from the author's own family. 
For grades 6-9. 

Hyppolite, Joanne Seth and Samona. Published: 1995. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC. 43109. Male Reader: 
Moore Bob. 

5th-grader Seth Michelin, who lives in Boston with his Haitian family, is confused by changes in his brother and 
sister. Even classmate Samona Gemini, whose wild ideas have been getting Seth into trouble for two years, surprises 
him by joining a beauty contest. For grades 4-7. 

Irwin, Hadley. Kini/Kimi. Published: 1987. Adult, Young Adult Short. Level: J&S. RC 29930. Avail: (AZIA) 8. 
Female Reader: Toren, Suzanne. 

Sixteen-year-old Kim Andrews, a Japanese-American, feels like a misfit in her Iowa town despite the love of her 
mother and stepfather. She leaves for a visit to Sacramento, California, to find out about her Japanese father, who 
died before she was born, and to trace his family. She is shocked when she learns of the suffering of Japanese- 
Americans during wwii. For junior and senior high and older readers. 

Kalman, Esther. Tchaikovsky Discovers America. Published: 1994. .Juvenile Short Level: 2-4. RC 43617. 

Female Reader: Toren, Suzanne. 

Jenny Petroff, who shares her birthday with Tchaikovsky, turns 1 1 on May 7,1891. One of her presents is to attend a 
concert conducted by Tchaikovsky at the new music hall in New York City. Another is money from an Uncle in 
Chicago. Jenny uses the money to buy a diary in which she records memories of her time with Tchaikovsky during 
his visit to America. For grades 2-4. 

Karas, G. Brian. Home On the Bayou: A Cowboy's Story. Published: 1996. Juvenile Short. Level: P-2. RC 
45520. Male Reader: Ganser, L. J. 

Ned is upset when his mother moves them out of cowboy country to live with Ned’s grandfather on the bayou. 
Because Ned's mother ruined his lasso, he must take the garden hose to his new school to demonstrate his cowboy 
roping skills. For preschool-grade 2. 

Kelly, Jeffrey. The Basement Baseball Club. Published: 1988. Juvenile Short. Level 4-7. RC 31558. Male 
Reader: Fox, Jack. 

Every Saturday morning the McCarthy Roaders play sandlot baseball with broom handles and tennis balls. 
Unfortunately the Roaders have lost nine straight games to their archrivals, the Hemlock St Poisons. But the 
Roaders still have hope. There’s a big kid John Johnson who’s just moved into the neighborhood, but every time 
shooter Carroll asks him to join the team he says no. Will shooter be able to convince him to play? Grades 4-7. 

Keyes, Frances Parkinson Wheeler. Once on Esplanade. Published: 1970. Adult, Young Adult. RC 08904. 
Female Reader: Kaufman, Jeanne. M. 

A novel of a young girl growing up within the warm circle of her New Orleans Creole family in the 1880's. She 
experiences the loss of her mother, her brother's involvement in a duel, a friendship with Jefferson Davis's daughter, 
and an unexpected encounter with a suitor. Adult and high school readers. 



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Konigsburg, E. L. T-backs, T-shirts, Coat, And Suit. Published: 1993. Young Adult Juvenile. Level: 5-8RC 
38298. Female Reader: Giannarelli, Laura. 

Chloe is spending the summer in Florida with her stepfather’s sister, Bemadette-an ex-hippie who drives a 
concession truck at the docks and shipyards. When some of the drivers begin wearing T-back (thong) bathing suits, 
a town-wide crisis develops as conservative Christians rally against such ’’indecency.” Bernadette refuses to take 
sides or explain her neutrality, as she and Chloe are swept into the controversy. Grades 5-8 and 
older readers. 

Krumgold, Joseph. And Now Miguel. Published: 1984. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. MoreTBNS. RC 23489. 

Male Reader: Wright, Jeff. 

An introspective New Mexico youth tells of his great longing to accompany the men and sheep to summer pasture. 
Neither child nor man, he feels the need to be recognized as a maturing individual. For grades 5-8. Newbery award. 
Rerecord of TB 1473. 

Lacapa, Kathleen & Michael. Less Than Half, More Than Whole. Published: 1994. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. 
AZC 02129. Female Reader: Citron, Bea. 

A child who is part Native American and part Anglo is concerned that he doesn’t look like his friends who are not 
interracial. His grandfather tells a story that helps him appreciate all the parts of his heritage. Grades K-4. 

Lane, Rose Wilder. Let the Hurricane Roar. Published: 1985. Adult, Young Adult Short. MoreTBNS. RC 
27780. Female Reader: Stanton, Charlotte. 

A short novel of frontier life in the Dakotas and the young couple who face crop failure, winter storms, separation, 
and loneliness with a staunch courage and steadfastness. Rerecord of TL33102. 

Lasky, Kathryn. The Bone Wars. Published: 1989. Adult, Young Adult. Level: J&S. RC 30280. Avail: (AZIA) 

7. Male Reader: Czapp, David. 

In the late 1800s, gold seekers and bone-hunting Paleontologists threaten Native Americans in the prairies and 
badlands. The author weaves familiar figures such as General Custer, Buffalo Bill Cody, Chief Crazy Horse, and 
Calamity Jane into the adventures of young scout Thad, and Julian, the Son of an English Paleontologist. For junior 
and senior high and older readers. 

Lee, Marie G. If It Hadn't Been For Yoon Jun. Published: 1993. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 40248. Female 
Reader: Cassidy, Grainne. 

Seventh-grader Alice Larsen is indifferent to her Korean ancestry. Adopted as a baby by a Minnesota family, she is 
a happy, popular cheerleader. When Yoon Jun Lee, a Korean immigrant new to the United States, begins attending 
Bainer Junior High, Alice thinks he’s weird. Then he becomes her partner for international day, and together they 
prepare a report on Korea, piquing Alice’s interest in her heritage and in friendship with Yoon Jun. For grades 4-7. 

Levitin, Sonia. Journey To America. Published: 1986. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. MoreTBNS. RC 
32959. Female Reader: Byers, Catherine. 

Germany, 1938. Something terrible is happening. Jews must wear yellow stars, and there are more and more 
restrictions on where they can go and what they can do. The Nazis are in power, and Lisa Platt is scared. Her father 
has gone to America and will send for Lisa, her mother, and her two sisters when there is enough money. For now 
they must wait in Switzerland. Grades 5-8. National Jewish book award. Rrcd TB4099. 

Lord, Bette. In The Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson. Published: 1984. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. More 
TBNS. RC 23538. Female Reader: Beaudry, Patricia. 

A young Chinese girl, "Shirley Temple Wong," comes to live in the U.S. in 1947. She has a difficult time making 
friends in her Brooklyn neighborhood until she discovers baseball and the Brooklyn dodgers. Grades 4-6. 



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Lynch, Chris. Shadow Boxer. Published: 1993. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Language Level: 6-9. RC 39462. 
Male Reader: Fox, Jack. 

After his father, a professional boxer, dies at an early age from years of being battered, George is left as the man of 
the house to steer his younger brother from the trouble that lurks in their tough, inner-city Boston streets. George 
and his mother's biggest fear is realized when Monty, 11, begins to hang around and train at a local boxing gym run 
by the boys' Uncle Archie. Some strong language. Grades 6-9 and older readers. 

MacLachlan, Patricia. Arthur for the Very First Time. Published: 1980. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 21620. 
Female Reader: Ragsdale, Grace. 

Arthur’s summer begins very badly and gets worse when his parents dump him at his aunt and uncle’s farm in the 
country. But things improve as Arthur gets to know his delightful relatives, their pet chicken who understands only 
French, and a rumpled and outspoken neighbor girl. Best of all, Arthur discovers that even he can be a hero in his 
own special way. For grades 4-7. 

Malmgren, Dallin. The Ninth Issue. Published: 1989. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. RC 39922. 

Female Reader: Carter, June. 

Blue Hocker is angry when he must transfer in his senior year from his small Missouri High School to a large Texas 
school. Failing to make the football team, he winds up in a journalism course that puts him on the staff of the school 
newspaper. Mr. Choate, the advisor, advocates a free press, and the students cover controversial stories. The 
principal, however, sees Mr. Choate as a threat and refuses to rehire him. For grades 6-9 and older readers. 

Martin, Ann M. Karen’s Sleepover. Published: 1990. Juvenile Short. Level: 2-4. RC 32808. Female Reader: 
Coons, Carole. 

Seven-year-old Karen Brewer lives in Stoney Brook, Conneticut., With her mother, stepfather, and little brother, 
Andrew. Every other weekend and for two weeks during the summer she and Andrew live with their father, 
stepmother, stepsister, three stepbrothers, and adopted baby sister. Karen is having her very first sleepover-at her 
father's house, and she can invite ten people. A baby-sitters little sister book. Grades2-4. 

McCall, Edith. Message From the Mountains. Published: 1985. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC 
28775. Male Reader: Halberstadt, Jeff. 

In 1826 Jim Matthew’s and his best friend Kit Carson live in Franklin, Missouri, the country’s westernmost town. 
They dream of running away to adventures in the untamed West. When Jim's father does not return from Mexico, 
Jim wants to go search for him, and kit urges his friend to join him on the last wagon train of the year. Grades 5-8. 

McCloskey, Robert. Homer Price. Published: 1976. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. More TBNS. RC 24724. Male 
Reader: Ahola, Robert. 

Nothing much happens in Centerburg, the home of the hero of this story, but plenty happens to him as he catches 
burglars with his pet skunk, makes non-stop doughnuts in his uncle's lunchroom, and comes to the aid of the super 
duper. For grades 4-7. 

McCloskey, Robert. One Morning in Maine. Published: 1952. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. More TBNS. RC 
40408. Female Reader: Buzzard, Madelyn. 

One morning in Maine, Sal jumps out of bed and hurries to get dressed. Today she and her baby sister Jane are 
going with their father to Buck’s Harbor. As Sal is brushing her teeth, she discovers a loose tooth. Before the 
morning is over her tooth has fallen out, but she can't find it. Now she won’t be able to put it under her pillow and 
make a wish. She wonders if her wish will come true anyway. For grades K-3. 

McCloskey, Robert. Time Of Wonder. Published: 1957. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. More TBNS. RC 40409. 
Female Reader: Gray, Janis. 

The author describes the enchanting beauty of a Maine Island in rain, fog, sunshine, and hurricane. For grades K-3. 
Caldecott medal 1958. Rerecord of RD 6292. 



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Mead, Alice. Crossing the Starlight Bridge. Published: 1994. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. RC 41220. Female 
Reader: Buzzard, Madelyn. 

Rayanne’s father didn’t want to miss her ninth birthday, but after she opened her presents he told her he was heading 
West to look for a job. Soon Rayanne and her mother are forced to leave the Island Penobscot Reservation where 
they live and move in with her grandmother on the mainland. It’s not easy to be the only Native American in a big 
school, but gram helps by telling traditional stories. 

Mead, Alice. Junebug. Published: 1995. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. RC 42388. Male Reader: Hurt, Christopher. 
Junebug, whose real name is Reeve McClain, Jr., has a wish that he thinks about a lot. It is too important to tell 
because his friends would laugh at him and because it is not likely to happen in the housing projects where he lives. 
His dream is to sail a boat to the West Indies, on a foaming sea with seagulls screeching. In the meantime, he takes 
good care of his sister and tries to stay out of the way of guys in the gangs. For grades 3-6. 

Means, Florence Crannell. Our Cup Is Broken. Published: 1969. Adult, Young Adult. RC 18552. Female 
Reader: Giannarelli, Laura. 

The tragic dilemma of a young Hopi woman trapped between two worlds. Raised by a well-meaning but insensitive 
white family, she returns to her native village and the life of her ancestors. But she can’t accept the ancient religion 
and customs any more than her own people can accept her. For high school and adult readers. 

Meltzer, Milton. Underground Man; A Novel. Published: 1990. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. 

More TBNS. RC 35044. Male Reader: Regensdorf, Phil. 

Josh Bowen, a northern farm boy, becomes an ardent abolitionist and risks his life to do rescue work for the 
Underground Railroad. For grades 6-9. RRCD RD6750. 

Meyer, Carolyn. Jubilee Journey (#2). Published: 1997. Juvenile Violence. Level: 5-8. RC 46308. Female 
Reader: Ekulona, Saidah Arrika. 

In this sequel to ‘white lilacs’ (RC45542), Thirteen-year-old Emily Rose travels to Texas with her mother and two 
brothers to visit her great-grandmother Rose Lee. Emily Rose and her brothers are biracial. They are both curious 
and dismayed with some of the events that occur in their Black family’s hometown. Some violence. For grades 5-8. 

Meyer, Carolyn. Rio Grande Stories. Published: 1994. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. AZC 02269. Female Reader: 
Blair, Marguerite. 

Students from Native American, Hispanic, African American, and Anglo cultures all meet in a new 7th grade class 
in Albuquerque. Writing a book about their diverse cultures they find out more about New Mexico and about their 
own heritage. Grades 5-8 and older readers. 

Michener, James A. Alaska Published: 1988. Adult Long. RC 26997. Male Reader: Askey, Bob. 

Heroes and villains, both real and fictional, abound in this epic historical novel which begins with a brief geological 
history and then leaps into the 18th century. The novel touches on topics such as the major native groups, the 
European explorers, Russian and American colonization, the gold rush, and Alaska’s statehood. Bestseller. Young 
adult and adult. 

Moore, Lilian. Don't Be Afraid Amanda. Published: 1992. Juvenile Short. Level: 2-4. RC 36340. Female 
Reader: Tessler, Yvonne Fair. 

It’s Amanda’s turn to muster the courage to leave her familiar surroundings-the city-to visit her friend Adam, the 
poet, in the country. In an event-filled day, Amanda discovers the special pleasures and dangers of country living. 
Grades 2-4. 

Morrison, Dorothy. Somebody's Horse. Published: 1986. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC 27915. 
Female Reader: Grandmaison, Sylvia. 

To her disappointment, Jenny learns that her parents are going to Asia for the summer, and she must stay with a 
cousin in Wyoming. There she finds an old, sick, abandoned horse, which she nurses back to health and names 
Farfalla, and which becomes a spirited competitor in barrel-racing and jumping events. But will the owner now 
come back to claim the beautiful Farfalla? Grades 5-8. 



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Namioka, Lensey. April And The Dragon Lady. Published: 1994. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. More 
TBNS. AZC02262. Female Reader: Allen, Eadie 

Caught between the traditional values of her immigrant Chinese grandmother and the world she sees around her as 
an American teenager, April finds it difficult to find her true self. Grades 6-9 and older. 

Namioka, Lensey. Yang The Youngest And His Terrible Ear (#1). Published: 1992. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. 

RC 36736. Male Reader: Horton, Jamie. 

Youngest of four in a musically gifted family, Yingtao is tone-deaf, but his father persists in teaching him the violin. 
The family recently immigrated to Seattle, and father hopes that the children’s performance at a recital will bring 
him more students. Yingtao makes friends with Matthew, who plays the violin well, but whose father would rather 
he play baseball, at which Yingtao now excels. Grades 3-6. 

Naylor, Phyllis Reynolds. The Fear Place. Published: 1994. Juvenile Short Language. Level: 4-7. More TBNS. 
RC 44615. Male Reader: Zeiger, Jim. 

Doug is camping with his geologist parents and his hateful brother Gordon in Colorado for the summer. When their 
parents have to fly out for an Uncle’s funeral, the brothers argue until Gordon stalks off to camp by himself on his 
favorite ridge. Days pass and Gordon doesn’t return, so, despite his fear of the ridge, Doug is forced to look for his 
brother. A surprisingly friendly cougar helps him face the ’’fear place.” Some strong language. For grades 4-7. 

Naylor, Phyllis Reynolds. Ice. Published: 1996. Juvenile. Level: 6-9. RC 45251. 

Although Chrissa has stopped speaking to her mother, she is stunned that her mother retaliates by sending her away, 
even if it is to her paternal grandmother’s house. Leaving New York City for rural upstate New York is a big 
change. During the year with her grandmother, Chrissa also changes, as she faces challenges on her own. For grades 
6-9. 



O’Dell, Scott. Island Of the Blue Dolphins (#1). Published: 1960. Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. More TBNS. RC 
22397. Avail: (AZIA) 4. Female Reader: Hodnapp, Ann. 

Accidentally left behind on an island off the coast of California when her tribe moved, an Indian girl tells about the 
eighteen years that she managed to survive and to find comfort, beauty, and, at times, joy in her solitude. For grades 
6-9. 



Paulsen, Gary. The Car. Published: 1994. Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. RC 44997. Male Reader: Kramer, 

Michael. 

At fourteen, Terry Anders is alone: he awoke one morning to find both parents gone. Terry assembles a car kit his 
father owned, and soon he is headed to Oregon in search of an Uncle. Before going far, Terry is joined by a 
Vietnam Vet and later the vet’s friend. The two adults mentor Terry as they travel America. For grades 6-9. 

Paulsen, Gary. The Crossing. Published: 1987. Adult, Young Adult Short. More TBNS. RC 31818. Avail: 
(AZIA) 8. Male Reader: Eiland, Ted. 

Manny is a fourteen-year-old homeless boy in the Mexican border town of Juarez. Always hungry and struggling to 
survive, he dreams of making the crossing to the U.S. Robert, an alcoholic American sergeant, is haunted by the 
memories of friends who died in Vietnam. When Manny tries to steal from Robert, they begin a strange relationship 
that leads to Robert’s death and Manny’s chance for survival. For high school and older readers. 

Paulsen, Gary. NightJohn Published: 1993. Young Adult Juvenile Short Violence. Level: 6-9. RC 38431. 
Female Reader: Stewart, Carole Jordan. 

Sarny is a slave girl, twelve-years-old according to Mammy’s notched stick. The cruel plantation owner buys a new 
field hand, NightJohn. Secretly, NightJohn teaches Sarny to read, a gift she carries like a rare jewel until the master 
catches her writing in the dirt. As punishment she and mammy are brutally beaten and NightJohn is maimed. More 
determined than ever, they continue their lessons. Grades 6-9 and older readers. Violence. 

Peck, Robert Newton. A Day No Pigs Would Die (HI). Published: 1972. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. 
More TBNS. RC 37104. Male Reader: Sullivan, Nick. 



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Explores the problems of growing up on a shaker farm in Vermont in the 1920’s. The story concerns a young boy’s 
pig-his growth, blue ribbon, and inevitable slaughter. Surrounding this are details of farm life, Yankee jokes, and 
family memories. Grades 6-9 and older readers. Rrcd RD6281. 

Pevsner, Stella. Sister of the Quints. Published: 1987. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC 28763. 

Female Reader: Mullen, Anne. 

Thirteen-year-old Natalie is a half-sister to quintuplets. Not only is she on call for baby-sitting, but the roomy 
Chicago home has become one huge nursery, and she is forever being identified as ’’sister of the quints." In a fit of 
self-pity, she calls and asks to join her mother in Colorado. But will she really be able to leave her friends at school 
and the quints? Grades 5-8. 

Politi, Leo. Moy Moy. Published: 1960. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. RC 11926. Female Reader: Woodcock, 
Joyce. 

A Chinese-American girl who lives on Chanking Street in Los Angeles enjoys the delights of the Chinese New 
Year-the dragon parade, firecrackers, goodies, toys, and other surprises. For grades K-3. 

Porte, Barbara Ann. Harry In Trouble. Published: 1989. Juvenile Short. Level: 2-4. RC 32086. Male Reader: 
Askey, Bob. 

Uh-oh! Harry has lost his library card again. The first time, girl, his dog, ate the card along with a cookie. The 
second time, he carefully placed the card in his back pocket, and his dad washed it in the washing machine. The 
third time, he cautiously put it up so that he would not lose it, and now he can’t remember where he put it, and he 
can’t find it anywhere. What will Ms. Katz, the librarian, do? Grades 2-4. 

Randle, Kristen D. The Only Alien On the Planet. Published: 1995. Young Adult Juvenile. Level: 6-9. RC 
46552. Female Reader: Dines, Carol. 

Ginny leads a secure, happy life until her high school Senior year. Suddenly her parents uproot the family and her 
oldest brother goes to college. Ginny becomes friends with her new next-door neighbor, Caulder, who introduces 
her to Smitty, a classmate who doesn’t ever talk. Caulder and Ginny make it their mission to help him. For grades 6- 
9 and older readers. 

Rawlings, Marjorie Kinnan.. The Yearling. Published: 1985. Adult, Young Adult Long. RC 33466. Female 
Reader: Ferris, Jill. 

A young boy whose family makes a precarious living on a backwoods farm in Northern Florida tames an orphaned 
fawn, but when the deer begins to eat the family com, Jody is ordered to shoot him. For junior and senior high 
readers. 

Richter, Conrad. The Light in the Forest. Published: 1953. Adult, Young Adult Short. More TBNS. RC 17656. 
Male Reader: Donley, Robert. 

A fifteen-year-old white boy raised by Indians is forcibly returned to his family eleven years after his capture and 
suffers from a conflict of loyalites. Reissue of TB 2905. 

Rinaldi, Ann. The Last Silk Dress. Published: 1988. Young Adult. Level: J&S. RC 31051. Avail: (AZIA) 8. 
Female Reader: Cundiff, Kerry. 

Susan, fourteen, lives in Richmond, the capital of the Confederacy. She adores her father, despairs of ever pleasing 
her mother, and wonders about the estrangement of her older brother Lucien. As the novel unfolds she befriends 
Lucien, falls in love with his Yankee friend, and learns that she is a ’’Yankee brat,” the result of an affair her mother 
had in revenge for the slave child begotten by Susan’s father. For junior and senior high readers. 

Ritter, John H. Choosing Up Sides. Published: 1998. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC 46935. 

In 1921 Luke Bledsoe, thirteen and his family relocate to an Ohio river town where his father is the new 
fundamentalist preacher. To his dad’s dismay, Luke discovers he has a natural skill for playing baseball. After he 
sees the famed Babe Ruth play for charity, Luke decides to defy his father for a place on the diamond. No one is 
prepared for the consequences. For grades 5-8. 



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Roberts, Willo Davis. Jo and The Bandit. Published: 1992. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 37444. Female 
Reader: Byers, Catherine. 

Texas, late 1860s. After their mother's death, twelve-year-old Jo and her younger brother are sent by stagecoach to 
their bachelor uncle, a storeowner and local Texas judge (who’s disappointed to learn that Jo is a girl). When the 
stagecoach is robbed, J o watches carefully and is able to draw pictures of the bandits. Later, however, Jo becomes 
fond of them, and saves the day when her uncle's plan to use her as bandit bait fails. Grades 4-7. 

Roberts, Willo Davis. The Minden Curse. Published: 1978. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 14585. Male Reader: 
Avers, Roy. 

Danny Minden seems to have inherited the family curse of always being on the scene when unusual things happen. 
He witnesses accidents and a bank robbery and plunges headlong into a mysterious kidnapping case. A humorous 
mystery for grades 4-7. 

Rossi, Joyce. The Gully washer. Published: 1995. Juvenile Short. Level: P-2. AZC 02005. Female Reader: 
Brooks, Elizabeth (RR). 

Leticia's grandfather shares with her fantastic tales of how he got his wrinkles, white hair, a round belly, and a bent 
back. Preschool-grade 3. 

Rushford, Patricia H. Too Many Secrets (#1). Published: 1993. Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. RC 40294. Female 
Reader: Pipes, Nona. 

Jennie McGrady is looking forward to her sixteenth birthday present: A vacation in Florida with her grand mother. 
But she is dismayed when her mother becomes engaged even though Jennie's long-missing father was never 
declared dead. Then Jennie learns gram, a former police officer turned writer, has been declared a fugitive from 
justice! Jennie and gram's neighbor Ryan set out to uncover the truth. For grades 6-9. 

Salisbury, Graham. Under The Blood-Red Sun. Published: 1994. Juvenile Violence Language. Level: 5-8. More 
TBNS. RC 44654. Male Reader: Tipton, Gary. 

Tomi is a thirteen-year-old living in Honolulu in 1941. His parents and grandfather are Japanese immigrants, and 
his best friend, Billy, is white, a Haole. Much to Tomi's dismay, his grandfather persists in calling himself Japanese 
and even flying Japan's flag. When the Japanese bomb pearl harbor, soldiers accuse Tomi's family of being spies. 
Even Billy begins treating Tomi differently. Some strong language and some violence. For grades 5-8. 

Schellie, Don. Me, Cholay And Co.: Apache Warriors. Published: 1973. Young Adult Short. Level: J&S. AZC 
01476. Male Reader: Grossman, Arthur. 

Cholay, an Apache prisoner at Camp Grant, attempts an escape but is stopped by a tackle and a few well placed 
blows from Joshua. The two of them become best friends and combine forces to rescue Apache children who were 
kidnapped by Papagos in a raid on Cholay's village. Junior and senior high readers. 

Schotter, Roni. Nothing Ever Happens On Ninetieth Street. Published: 1997. Juvenile Short. Level: 2-4. RC 
46217. Female Reader: Giannarelli, Laura. 

Eva is sitting on the stoop waiting for something to happen, so she will have something to write about. But nothing 
ever happens on 90th street! Then one person suggests that she choose a topic she knows well, another urges Eva to 
use. 

Schulte, Elaine L. Melanie and The Modeling Mess. Published: 1994. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. RC 41733. 
Female Reader: Pardee, Martha Harmon. 

Melanie Lin has just moved to California from New York where she frequently did some modeling. She has been 
watching the members of the Twelve Candles Club and longs to join them because they seem to have so much fun 
together. But when Melanie offers to get the girls a modeling job, she may just be asking for trouble. For grades 3- 
6. 

Schweizer, Byrd Baylor. Amigo. Published: 1963. Juvenile Short. AZCO 1381. Female Reader: Scarfo, 
Rosemary. 

A Mexican boy whose family cannot afford a dog for rim tames a wild prairie dog, and the young prairie dog tames 
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Sharmat, Marjorie Weinman. Gila Monsters meet you at the Airport. Published: 1983. Juvenile Short. Level: K- 
3. MoreTBNS. AZC 01434. Female Reader: Scarfo, Rosemary. 

Any. City boy’s preconceived ideas of life in the West make him very apprehensive about the family’s move there. 
Grades K-3. 

Slepian, Janice. The Alfred Summer (#1). Published: 1980. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC 21341. Female 
Reader: McQuaid, Sally. 

Although Lester has cerebral palsy, he manages to save the life of Alfred, a retarded boy, at the beach. The two 
team up with other outcasts to build a boat. While the project nearly ends in tragedy, the four kids discover there are 
many ways of being special. A vivid story told with humor. For grades 5-8. 

Snyder, Zilpha Keatley. Gib Rides Home. Published: 1998. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 46233. Male Reader: 
Huntey, Bruce. 

Nebraska, 1909. When Gib Whittaker reappears at the orphanage, all the boys are shocked and worried. An orphan 
has never returned before. Gib had been farmed out to a ranch where he rediscovered his love and skill with horses 
as well as neighbors from his past. Returning was hard on Gib. For grades 4-7. 

Sorenson, Virginia. Plain Girl. Published: 1955. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 17036. Female Reader: 
Bederman, Mimi. 

Esther, an inquisitive Amish girl, is almost ten-years-old before Pennsylvania authorities require her father to send 
her to public school. Secretly Esther is thrilled about all the wonderful things she will learn in school, but is also 
afraid that school will raise questions for her as it did for her beloved big brother, who finally ran away from home. 
Grades 4-7 and older readers. 

Soto, Gary. Chato's Kitchen. Published: 1995. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. RC 41971. Female Reader: 
Giannarelli, Laura. 

Chato, a low-riding cat with six stripes, is sneaking up on a sparrow when he hears noise coming from next door. He 
peeks through the fence and discovers a family of five fat, juicy mice moving in. Chato gets a wonderful idea-invite 
them for dinner! Only Chato plans for them to be his dinner. The mice accept Chato’s invitation, but bring along a 
surprise guest. For grades K-3. 

Soto, Gary. Local News. Published: 1993. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC 44338. Male Reader: Pinney, Michael. 
Thirteen tales set in a Mexican American neighborhood in which young boys and girls share the embarrassment and 
disappointments they frequently endure at the hands of friends or siblings. Companion to “Baseball in April and 
Other Stories”. (RC 37667). For grades 5-8. 

Soto, Gary. Pacific Crossing. Published: 1992. Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. AZC 02019. Male Reader: Yeater, 
Jim. 

Lincoln Mendoza, introduced in ’taking sides’, spends a summer in Japan. He is being sent because of his martial 
arts training, but he finds there s a lot more to Japanese life and tradition. He also discovers that it isn't easy to 
explain life in San Francisco or how he can be both Mexican and American at the same time. Adventures and 
culture swapping with his Japanese brother add a new dimension to his life. Grades 6-9. 

Soto, Gary. The Pool Party . Published: 1993. Juvenile Short. RC 40403. Male Reader: Huntey, Bruce. 

When a wealthy classmate invites Rudy Herrera to a pool party, he worries about what it will be like and an 
appropriate gift for the hostess. His relatives offer plenty of advice on how to act and make small talk, and his father 
stresses that he be proud of his Mexican American heritage and his family no matter what. For grades 4-7. 

Speare, Elizabeth George. The Witch of Blackbird Pond. Published: 1958. Juvenile. Level: 6-9. MoreTBNS 
RC 22927. Female Reader: Beaudry, Patricia. 

When sixteen-year-old Kit Tyler tries to aid a woman accused of witchcraft in colonial New England, she herself is 
brought to trial as a suspect. Kit's young friend. Prudence, whom she has taught to read, and Nat, a sailor who has 
fallen in love with Kit, come to her defense. For grades 6-9 and older readers. Newbery award. Rerecord of TB 
1816. CB 188. 



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Surat, Michele Marie. Angel Child, Dragon Child. Published: 1990. Juvenile Short. Level: P-2. RC 37510. 
Female Reader: Schraf, Kimberly. 

It is Ut's first day at school. She has come with her sisters because her mother is still in Vietnam, but Ut carries her 
picture in a matchbox. An American boy with red hair shouts that she is wearing pajamas to school, and the other 
kids join in the laughter. But Ut and Raymond (The American Boy) become friends when they are sent to the 
principal's office for fighting, and he helps to bring a gift to Ut and her family. Preschool-grade 2. 

Talbert, Marc. Pillow Of Clouds. Published: 1991. Young Adults Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. RC 35533. Avail: 
(AZIA) 6. Male Reader: Sandvold, Erik. 

Now that Chester is thirteen, he has been given the terrible task of choosing the parent that he will live with. Having 
just spent the summer with his easygoing dad in Santa Fe, he is torn between him and his alcoholic mom, and 
between the spirit of New Mexico and the staidness of Iowa. He agonizes, comes to a decision that he believes is 
right for him, but is then racked with guilt when his mother attempts suicide. For grades 6-9 and older readers. 

Tan, Amy. The Moon Lady ( Adapted From n The Joy Luck Club n ). Published: 1992. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. 

RC 36467. Female Reader: Tessler, Yvonne Fair. 

A Grandmother living in America tells her granddaughters of her childhood adventure at the moon festival. Ying- 
Ying, a pampered child living in China, travels by boat to catch a glimpse of the moon lady and to tell the lady her 
secret wish. When Ying-Ying is lost at sea and the real identity of the moon lady is revealed, Ying-Ying discovers 
the true wish of her heart. Grades 3-6and older readers. 

Tate, Eleanora E. A Blessing in Disguise. Published: 1995. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. More TBNS. RC 45827. 
Female Reader: Pipes, Nona. 

In this companion volume to The Secret Of Gumbo Grove’ (RC 27484) and Thank you, Dr. Martin Luther King, 
Jr.!' (RC37841), twelve-year-old Zambia Brown is torn between family members. Raised by her strict aunt and 
uncle from age four, Zambia envies the lifestyle of her father and older half-sisters. She refuses to listen to the 
realities of her father's drug business until a tragedy occurs. For grades 5-8. 

Taylor, Mildred D. The Friendship. Published: 1987. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. More TBNS. RC 27508. 

Female Reader: Byrd, Carolyn. 

Cassie Logan and her brothers witness a moving confrontation between Mr. Tom Bee, an elderly black man, and 
Mr. John Wallace, the white storekeeper, in Mississippi in the 1930s. Grades 5-8. 

Taylor, Theodore. Maria: A Christmas Story. Published: 1992. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 37023. Female 
Reader: Gordon, Sheena. 

Eleven-year-old Maria Gonzaga lives in a small town in California where Christmas is celebrated with a parade of 
expensive floats. No Mexican-Americans have ever entered a float in the parade. Maria, envious and tired of the 
prattling of the Anglo girls about their families' floats, announces that her family, too, will be entering, although 
they can barely afford the entrance fee. Grades 4-7. 

Thonasnam, Kenneth. Pathki Nana. Published: 1991. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 36729. Female Reader: 
Ward, Pam. 

Pathki, Nana , an eight-year-old Kootenai Indian girl, is always sad. She can often be seen walking alone, going off 
by herself, with tears streaming down her face. The other villagers call Pathki "the sad one." When her grandmother, 
quiet one, tells Pathki the story of Pathki's birth and instructs her to seek her guardian spirit, Pathki's strength, 
wisdom, and courage are tested. Grades 4-7 

Twain, Mark. Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn (Comp. Edition). Published: 1996. Adult Long Language. RC 
43591. Male Reader: Polk, John. 

A comprehensive edition of Twain's 1885 tale about a boy who runs away from home and floats down the 
Mississippi on a raft with an escaping slave. Includes four episodes originally deleted from the first edition, an 
introduction by Twain biographer Justin Kaplan, and an addendum of explanatory and interpretive notes. Young 
adult and adult. Strong language. 



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Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Published: 1962. Adult, Young Adult Juvenile. .More TBNS. RC 
15223. Male Reader: Pielmeier, John. 

A mischievous boy growing up in a Mississippi River town in the 19th century impresses his friends and horrifies 
adults by associating with the son of the town drunk, running away from home, attending his own funeral, 
witnessing a murder, and finding lost treasure. Rerecord of TB957652627. 

Uchida, Yoshiko. The Bracelet. Published: 1976. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. RC 43257. Female Reader Gray 
Janis. J9 

In 1942 Emi and her family are being sent to a prison camp just because they are Japanese Americans. Emi's best 
friend, Laurie, gives Emi a bracelet to wear in camp so she’ll always remember her. But on the first day at camp, 
Emi loses the bracelet. Now Emi wonders how she will be able to remember her friend. For grades K-3. 

Uchida, Yoshikoa. Jar Of Dreams (#1). Published: 1981. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC 22368. Female Reader 
Giannarelli, Laura. 

More than anything else in the whole world, Rinko wants to be like everyone else. But being Japanese in California 
during the great depression is hard not only for Rinko, but also for her whole, hard-working family. Followed by 
"the best bad thing." For grades 5-8 and older readers. 

Villareal, Jose Antonio. Pocho. Published: 1989. Adult, Young Adult. AZC.02116. Male Reader: Yeater, Jim. 

An immigrant family from Mexico encounters conflict between the traditions of their old home and adjustment to 
new ideas. Richard, the young 'Pocho', or person whose parents came to the United States from Mexico. Comes of 
age in the 1930s, but the problems he and his family face show commonalties with Americans of any period. For 
high school and adult readers. 

Voight, Cynthia. Come A Stranger. Published: 1986. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 5*8. RC 25488. Avail: 
(AZIA) 5. Female Reader: Byrd, Carolyn. 

When Mina is sent home from an exclusive ballet camp, she wonders if it is because she is black. Tamer, the 
summer replacement minister at her church, helps her through the pain of rejection. She loves Tamer, and over the 
next few summers their friendship is crucial in helping her through the difficulties of adolescence. Grades 5 and up. 

Weber, Lenora Mattingly. How Long Is Always? Published: 1970. Juvenile Short. Level: 5*8. RC 14513 Female 
Reader: McCullough, Michael. 

Stacy Belford impulsively answers an ad for a summer job requiring an ’'unusual girl” and finds herself an 
unwelcome guest on a ranch miles from home. A Stacy Belford family romance for grades 5*8. 

Wilder, Laura Ingalls. Farmer Boy (#9 Little House Series). Published: 1953. Juvenile. Level: 4-7. More TBNS. 
RC 21019. Male Reader: Bateman, Dennis. 

Story about a traditional farm family in Upper N.Y. State in the 1860's tells about work, school, and simple 
amusements and introduces nine-year-old Almanzo Wilder, who later married Laura Ingalls. For grades 4-7 and 
older readers. 



Wilder, Laura Ingalls. Little House on the Prairie (#2 In Series). Published: 1953. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. 
More TBNS. RC 10929. Female Reader: McCarty, Vicki. 

The Ingalls family moves westward from Wisconsin in a covered wagon and builds a cabin on the Kansas prairie, 
only to discover that it is in Indian Territory. Sequel to "Little House In The Bigwoods " RC 13972. Rerecord of TB 



Wilder, Laura Ingalls. West from Home: Letters of Laura Ingalls Wilderl91 5. Published: 1974 Adult Young 
Adult Short. Level: J&S. More TBNS. RC 08759. Female Reader: Ambrose, Marion. 

Long letters to the author’s husband reflecting excitement of her experiences on a visit to San Francisco in 1915 For 
junior and senior high and adult readers. 

Wilkinson, Brenda. Ludell. Published: 1975. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC 12434. Male Reader Hyman 
Earle. J 

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Portrays Ludell Wilson with her relatives, neighbors, and classmates and the poor, scrappy days in their black 
community in Georgia. For grades 5-8. Precedes "Ludell and Willie". 

Winthrop, Elizabeth. Belinda's Hurricane. Published: 1984. Juvenile Short. Level: 2-4. More TBNS. RC 24706. 
Female Reader: Grandmaison, Sylvia. 

Bad weather causes nine-year-old Belinda to prolong a vacation that she is enjoying at her granny May's seaside 
home. During the storm, Belinda gets to know Granny May's grumpy neighbor, who presents her with a welcome 
surprise. For grades 2-4. 

Williams, Vera B. Scooter. Published: 1993. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. RC 40036. Female Reader: Byers, 
Catherine. 

Elana Rose Rosen and her mother have just moved to an apartment in N.Y. City. On her prized scooter with the 
silver and blue stripes, Elana excitedly explores her surroundings. New friends, old friends, a winning field day, and 
a silent, young friend (Petey, with whom she enjoys a special relationship) fill her days as she fills sheet after sheet 
of paper with her experiences, acrostics, and drawings. Grades 3-6. 

Wunderli, Stephen. The Blue between the Clouds. Published: 1992. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. AZC 02017. 

Male Reader: Means, Alan (RRRB). 

When two moons, a Navajo boy, comes to town in 1939 to go to school, he gets into a fight his very first day with 
Matt, a schoolmate. The principal decides that since two moons needs a place to live for the school year, it had 
better be with Matt, so that the two eleven-year-olds can learn to get along. The boys become best friends, with lots 
of projects, but most importantly, are learning to fly. Grades 4-7. 

Yep, Laurence. Child of the Owl (#1). Published: 1977. Juvenile. Level: 5-8. RC 11545. Male Reader: Stratton, 
John. 

Street- wise Casey, a twelve- year-old who knows more about horse racing than about her Chinese heritage, feels 
completely out of place when she is sent to live with her grandmother in san Francisco’s Chinatown. A touching 
novel for grades 5-8. 

Yolen, Jane. Letting Swift River Go. Published: 1992. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. RC 36180. Female Reader: 
Dulaski, Ilona. 

The site of the Quabbin reservoir in Western Massachusetts was once the location of the vibrant, rural swift river 
towns. Young Sally Jane relates how the nearby city of Boston needed more water, so the towns' graves were 
moved, then all the trees were cut down, the houses were taken away or bulldozed, and all the people were located, 
with their lives changed forever as the waters came. Grades K-3. 

Young, Ronder Thomas. Learning By Heart. Published: 1993. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 38714. Female 
Reader: Nelson, Gail. 

Set in the South in the 1960s, this story describes the developing friendship between Rachel, a 10-year-old white 
child, and Isabella, the family's young African American maid hired to care for Rachel and her baby brother when 
they move into a new home. Rachel adjusts to her new sibling, deals with varied friendships at school, and comes to 
a dawning awareness of the racial prejudices in her small town. Grades 4-7 and older readers. 



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SPECIAL NEEDS | 



SEA TO SEA MYTHS AND FOLKLORE 



Baylor, Byrd. The Desert Is Theirs. Published: 1975. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. AZCO 1314. Male Reader: 
Holland, Leo. 

A book celebrating the desert with its hawks, lizards, coyotes, and Papago Indians. Includes creation legends, Indian 
customs, comparisons of desert animals and desert people, and thought about Indian rains. Grades K-3 

Belting, Natalia. Whirlwind is a Ghost Dancing. No date. Juvenile. Level: 4-7. RC09944. Male Reader: 
Stratton, John. 

Vivid poetic images of North American Indian lore that portrays the stars as nightbirds, the sun as a yellow-tipped 
porcupine, and icicles as walking sticks of the winter winds. Grades 4-7. 

Bierhorst, John. Naked Bear: Folktales of The Iroquois. Published: 1987. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 5- 
8. RC 29434. Female Reader: O'Neal, Mary. 

A collection of sixteen traditional tales told by the Iroquois Indians, who inhabited what is now N.Y. State. Includes 
stories of boy heroes, trickster turtles, flesh-eating creatures, and stone giants. Grades 5-8 and older readers. 

Bruchac, Joseph. Illustrated By Murv Jacob. The Boy Who Lived With The Bears And Other Iroquois Stories 
Published: 1995. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. AZC02244. Female Reader: McCune, Pamela houses. Bruchac 
shares six traditional stories of animals who learn responsibility, sharing, and love. Grades K-6. 

In the old days, the Iroquois, or people of the longhouse, told many stories around the central fires of their clan 

Bruchac, Joseph and Gayle Ross. The Story Of The Milky Way: A Cherokee Tale. Published: 1995. Juvenile Short 
Level: K-3. RC 43759. Male Reader: Kramer, Michael. 

Long ago there were not many stars in the sky. And in those days the people depended on com for most of their 
food. One day an elderly couple discovers someone has stolen some cornmeal. When the villagers try to stop the 
thief, their actions result in many more stars to light the night. For grades K-3. 

Dewit, Dorothy. The Talking Stone. Published: 1979. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. More Tbns. RC 21804. 
Female Reader: Giannarelli, Laura 

A glimpse into the rich folklore of the Indians, these stories deal with tribal history and heroes, the much loved 
trickster figures, and the origins of various animals and celestial bodies, a few, such as "little burnt face," an 
algonquin cousin of Cinderella, show the influence of early settlers. For grades 5-8 and older readers. 

Dixon, Ann. How Raven Brought Light to People. Published: 1992. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. RC 38202. 
Female Reader: Chappell, Andy. 

A long time ago, the earth was new, and the people had no light. A great chief hid the sun, the moon, and the stars in 
three wooden boxes. Raven grew tired of the darkness and angry that the chief kept the light from earth's people. 
This is a tale of how raven tricks the chief out of the boxes, and gains black feathers in the process. Adapted from an 
Alaskan Tlingit Indian legend. For grades K-3 and older. 

Readers. 

Dobie, J. Frank. The Longhorns. Published: 1941. Adult, Young adult Long. RC 18815. Male Reader Atcher 
Randy. 

The longhorns of the American southwest are descendants of the cattle which the early Spanish explorers brought to 
this continent. Their history, tall tales about them, folklore, and verse are rounded up in this refreshing volume. 

Ernst, Lisa Campbell. Little Red Riding Hood: A Newfangled Prairie Tale. Published: 1995. Juvenile Short. 
Level: K-3. RC 44438. Female Reader: Giannarelli, Laura. 

A little girl living at the edge of the prairie always wears a jacket with a red hood when she rides her bicycle. One 
hot summer day she decides to take grandma some freshly baked muffins and lemonade. Along the way, she is 
tricked by the wolf, who gets to grandma's house first. But the wolf has quite a surprise awaiting him. For grades K- 

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Faulkner, William J. The Days When The Animals Talked: Black American Folktales and Ho. Published: 1977. 
Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 12247. Male Reader: Hyman, Earle. 

A collection of lively black folktales and dramatic anecdotes about the days of slavery, These stories were told to 
the author during his childhood by an old ex-slave. Includes twenty-four Brer Rabbit stories. For grades 4-7 and 
other older interested readers. 

Goble, Paul. Beyond The Ridge. Published: 1989. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 6-9. RC 34765. Female 
Reader: Gray, Janis. 

The plains Indians believe that dying is like climbing a long, steep slope towards a tall ridge on the great plains. 
From the tip-top one can see the "beyond the ridge," which is also called the spirit world or the land of many tipis. 
In this poetic tale, an elderly Native American woman dies and travels to the spirit world. Her grieving relatives 
prepare her body according to plains Indian customs. For grades 6-9 and older readers. 

Goble, Paul. The Great Race of the Birds and Animals. Published: 1985. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. RC 24365. 
Female Reader: Friedlander, Mitzi. 

A retelling of the Cheyenne and Sioux myth about a contest called by the creator to determine whether man or the 
buffalo should have supremacy and become the guardians of creation. Grades K-3. 

Haley, Gail E. Jack and The Bean Tree. Published: 1986. Juvenile Short. Level: P-2. More Tbns. RC 25135. 
Female Reader: Tessler, Yvonne Fair 

Famous tale of the giant in the sky, as told by poppyseed, an old lady in southern Appalachia. Jack and his maw are 
so poor, they have to sell their cow, milky white, to put food on the table. But instead of selling her, jack trades 
milky white for some magic beans. Preschool to grade 2. 

Haley, Gail E. Retold by. Mountain Jack Tales. Published: 1992. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 40081. Female 
Reader: Sales, Terry Hayes. 

A collection of tales about the North Carolina Appalachian folk hero, Jack. Included are Jack and the Northwest 
wind, Jack and Uncle Thimblewit, and 'Jack and old raggedy bones'. For grades 4-7 and older readers. 

High water, Jamake. Native Land. Published: 1986. Adult. RC 25397. Male Reader: Williams, Jake. 

Study of the cultural history of pre-Columbian American civilization. Starts with the dawn of humanity in the 
Americas and explores the folk histories, myths, and spiritual beliefs and rituals of vanished civilizations such as the 
Maya, Inca, Aztecs, mound builders, and cliff dwellers. 

Jagendorf, M.A. Folk Stories of the South. No Date. Adult, Young Adult Juvenile. Level: 6-9. RC 09943. Male 
Reader: Donley, Robert. 

A robust collection of nearly one hundred short, colorful tales from eleven southern states. For grades 5-9 and adult 
lovers of folklore. 

Kellogg, Steven. / Was Born About Ten Thousand Years Ago: A Tall Tale. Published: 1996. Juvenile Short. 
Level: K-3. RC 45277. Male Reader: Askey, Bob. 

The storyteller, born about 100 centuries ago, relates the events he has seen over the years. He saw Adam and Eve 
driven from the Garden of Eden, he saw Christopher Columbus reach America, he helped Johnny Appleseed plant 
each seed, and he played hopscotch with some spacemen on the moon. For grades K-3. 

Kellogg, Steven. Johnny Appleseed. Published: 1989. Juvenile Short. Level: 2-4. RC 33072. Male Reader: Fox, 
Jack. 

John Chapman, who later became known as Johnny Appleseed, was born in 1774 in Massachusetts. Near his home 
was an apple orchard, and John loved to watch the apples grow. The animals sensed his love of nature and grew to 
trust him. As soon as he was old enough, John left home to explore the West. He planted apple trees along the way, 
and the legends about him grew larger than life. Grades 2-4 and older readers. 



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Kellogg, Steven (Retold By). Pecos Bill. Published: 1986. Juvenile Short. Level: 2-4. Has Had. More Tbns. RC 
25297. Male Reader: Guidall, George. 

The story of one of the West’s larger-than-life heroes, who invented rodeos, lassos, and cattle roping. For grades 2- 
4. Rerecord of Tb 1976 

Kutz, Jack. Mysteries and Miracles of Arizona. Published: 1992. Adult. ACZ02072. Male Reader: Brahs, 
Dwight. Directions to and the stories behind such strange and sometimes eerie places in Arizona as soap creek, 
where gold nuggets may be lurking, terra calaus, where possible roman artifacts were unearthed in 1924, and the site 
of ’’the ghost” of coal mine canyon, near Tuba City. Young adult and adult readers. 

LaCapa, Michael. Antelope Woman. Published: 1992. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. More Tbns. AZC 01786. 
Female Reader: Johnston, Judy. 

A beautiful Apache maiden follows the mysterious young man who has come to teach her people to respect ’’all 
things great and small” and becomes his wife. Grades K-3. 

Lester, Julius. .The Last Tales of Uncle Remus. Published: 1994. Young Adult Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC 
39229. Male Reader: Polk, John. 

In this fourth volume of Brer Rabbit tales, Lester again employs contemporary black dialect and modern allusions. 
Includes an essay on uncle Remus - the controversial literary creation of Joel Chandler Harris - and 39 stories of the 
adventures and misadventures of Brer Rabbit, his friends, and his enemies. Sequel to the further tales of Uncle 
Remus. RC. Grades 5-8 and older readers. 

McKissack, Patricia C. The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural. Published: 1992. Young Adult 
Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC 36183. Male Reader: Moore, Bob. 

The author invites readers to gather in the "dark-thirty” the eerie half hour just before dark, for ten tales inspired by 
African-American folklore and history. In "we organized" a cruel owner is forced by magic to free his slaves; in 
"justice” a KKK lynching victim returns to haunt; and in the 1 1:59 a porter knows when his time is up. Coretta Scott 
King award. For grades 5-8 and older readers. 

Howard, Jane. Families. Published: 1978. Adult Language. RC 16045. Female Reader: Foote, Mary S. 

RC-The author relates myths, jokes, and rituals collected from American families across the country, including her 
own family, the First Family, extended immigrant families, single parents and alternative groups from Communes to 
Ashrams. High school and adult readers. Some strong language. 

Norman, Howard. The Girl Who Dreamed Only Geese: And Other Tales Of The far North. Published: 1997. 
Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 45962. Female Reader: Cavallero, Gabriella. 

Ten stories from inuit oral tradition include portrayals of tundra wildlife — puffins, a wolverine, a seagull, a 
narwhal, and geese. The biblical Noah appears in ‘Noah hunts a woolly mammoth’. In the title piece, a young girl’s 
ability to help maintain the village food supply by dreaming about geese is challenged by a Shaman. For grades 4-7. 

Osborne, Mary Pope. American Tall Tales. Published: 1991. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. RC 35612. Female 
Reader: Dulaski, Ilona. 

The author presents nine all-American folk figures whose extraordinary exploits take them from coast to coast. 
Included are Sally and Thunder Ann Whirlwind, a composite of several legendary characters; actual people like 
Davy Crockett, Johnny Appleseed, and John Henry (historians disagree on whether he was real); and fictitious 
characters such as Pecos Bill, Paul Bunyan, and Febold Feboldson. Grades 3-6 and older readers. 

Richter, Conrad. Over The Blue Mountain. Published: 1967. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 15255. Avail: 
(AZIA) 4. Female Reader: Grund, Mary T. 

Haunting story of two Pennsylvania Dutch boys, a folk legend, and a miracle. For grades 4-7 and older readers. 

Rounds, Glen. Mr. Yowder and The Giant Bull Snake. Published: 1978. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. RC 12530. 
Male Reader: Bell, Ralph 

Rollicking tall tale about a sign painter and a giant bull snake who create a national commotion when they unseat 
Buffalo Bill as official buffalo hunter for the United States Army. For grades 3-6. 

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Sanfield, Steve. The Adventures Of High John The Conqueror. Published: 1989. Juvenile Short. Level: 4-7. RC 
33115. Male Reader: Askey, Bob. 

A collection of sixteen tales about High John the Conqueror, the trickster hero of African-American during slavery 
time. Interspersed between the tales are brief clips of information on slavery in America. Grades 4-7 and older 
readers. 

San Souci, Robert D. Larger than Life. Published: 1991. Juvenile Short. Level: 3-6. RC 38170. Male Reader: 
Quinn, Bill 

John Henry weighed 44 pounds at birth, and loved hammering even as a baby. Alfred Bulltop Stormalong, who 
always loved the sea, stood 24’ tall, and Slue-Foot Sue, big and brawny, could do the work of ten men. The author 
retells five tall tales about these and other legendary American heroes. Grades 3-6 and older readers. 

Schwartz, Alvin. Whoppers: Tall Tales And other Lies. Published: 1975. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. RC 09263. 
Male Reader: Moodie, Michael. 

A pack of 145 lies from American folklore describing outlandish things that never happened and never could. For 
grades 5-8. 

Shaw, Anna Moore. Pima Indian. Legends. Published: 1968. Juvenile Short. Level: 5-8. AZC 01385. Female 
Reader: Brooks, Elizabeth. 

These legends from the Pima village of Gila crossing have been modified over the years to reflect the changes in the 
cultural tradition. Coyote plays a dominant role in many of these legends which convey moral lessons that have been 
passed down from generation to generation. Grades 5-9. 

Walter, Milded Pitts. Ty's One-Man Band. Published: 1980. Juvenile Short. Level: K-3. RC.22727. Female 
Reader: Grandmaison, Sylvia 

An original American folktale in which a boy discovers a peg-legged stranger who claims to be a one-man band. For 
grades K-3 and older readers. 

Wyeth, Sharon Dennis. Vampire Bugs: Stories Conjured from The Past. Published: 1995. Juvenile Short. Level 3- 
6. RC 41000. Female Reader: Carter, June. 

Six short African American and Native American folk tales that incorporate historical characters and facts. The title 
story is a myth about the origin of lightning bugs. For grades 3-6. 



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CM 

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RESOURCES 



If you know of performers or resource people who are willing to work with libraries, please fill 
out a form and mail it to us. 

If you have noted useful companies, materials and organizations for upcoming themes: 2001: 
A READING ODYSSEY share it with the library community. 

Mail your suggestions to: 



Arizona Humanities Council 
1242 N. Central 
Phoenix, AZ 85004 
602-257-0335 
Fax: 602-257-0392 



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RESOURCES | 



RESOURCE PEOPLE 



Contact Person: 

Name: 

Address: 

Telephone: 

Description of Performance: 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Travel Range: 

Past Performances: 



Contact Person: 

Name: 

Address: 

Telephone: 

Description of Performance: 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Travel Range: 

Past Performances: 

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RESOURCES 1 



RESOURCE COMPANIES/ORGANIZATIONS 



Company or Organization Name: 



Address: 



Telephone: 



Fax: 



Description of Materials Relevant to ARP: 



Company or Organization Name: 



Address: 



Telephone: 



Fax: 



Description of Materials Relevant to ARP: 



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RESOURCE PEOPLE | 



CATEGORIES FOR RESOURCE PEOPLE 



ARTS & CRAFTS 
AUTHORS 
CARTOONISTS 
CLOWNS 

CREATIVE WRITING 

DANCERS 

DRAMA 

FOLKLORIST 

HEALTH 

HISTORY 

HOBBIES 

ILLUSTRATORS 

JUGGLERS 

LECTURER 

MAGICIANS 

MUSEUMS 

MUSICIANS 

NATURE 

PERSONAL IMPROVEMENT 

POETRY READING/WORKSHOPS 

PUPPETEERS 

SAFETY 

SCIENCE 

SIGN LANGUAGE 

SONG WRITER 

STORY TELLERS 

STUNT TEAM 

VARIETY ACTS 

RESOURCE PEOPLE 

Listed by Category 



ARTS & CRAFTS 
Arboretum of Flagstaff 
Doris Asano 
Susan Corl 



AUTHORS 
Joan Bourque 
Lollie Butler 

Dorothy Anderson Daniels 
Margaret K. Garaway 
Fatimah Halim 
B. G. Hennessy 
Heather Irbinskas 
Kathryn Lance 
Cynthia Lukas 
Jan Mike 
Joan Sandin 
Mary Ruth Shropshire 
Jan Romero Stevens 




Dorothy Hines Weaver 
Diane Winslow 
Diane Iverson 

CARTOONISTS 
Danny Handke 
Steve Parker* 

Stan Tang 



CLOWNS 

Aces Entertainment 

DJ the Clown 

Luv Clowns, Alice Stewart 



CREATIVE WRITING 

Kathryn Lance 
Cynthia Lukas 
Jan Mike 
Joan Sandin 



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RESOURCE PEOPLE] 



Gene Williams 
Janet Winans* 



DANCERS 
Aloha Hoomalimali* 

Berta Benally* 

Folksteppers, Alice Stewart* 
Phoenix Irish Step Dancers 



DRAMA 



FOLKLORIST 



HEALTH & SAFETY 

Arizona Public Service (Carol Rosson*) 
Coconino Dept, of Health Services 
Coconino County Sheriffs Department* 
Tom Marcellino 
Dick Schick 

Smokey The Bear, Woodsy the Owl 
State Farm Insurance (Lori Snow) 



HISTORY 

Arizona Historical Society, Pat Walton 
Heard Museum 

Society for Creative Anacronism* 



HOBBIES 



ILLUSTRATORS 

Joan Bourque 
Sylvia Long 
Joan Sandin 
Stan Tang 

JUGGLER 

Frank Cardamone 



LECTURER 

Deanne Lewis RN, CMS 



MAGICIANS 

Paul W. Estes of The Magicians 
Kimberley Phelps 
Jolly Roger 

Dale E. Miller, Society of American 
Magicians 



Presto Magic Studio, Barry Schor 

Dick Schick 

Susan Seats 

Michael Steele 

Allan Wade* 



MUSEUMS 

Arizona Science Center 

Heard Museum 

Museum of Northern Arizona 

MUSICIANS 

Mary Hollan (Singer & Pianist) 

Ken and Lynne Mikell 
Music Performance Trust Funds; Phoenix 
Federation of Musicians 
Tony Norris 

Quintessence Chamber Ensemble 
"Loca Rosa" a.k.a. Tish Dvorkin 
Southwest Brass, Russ Plylar* 

String Sounds, Susan Smith 
John Williams 
Lynn Lynton 
Laurie Burke 

NATURE 

Penny Artio* 

Arboretum of Flagstaff 
K.E. Conway* 

Thomas M. Marcellino 
Mohave County Cooperative Extension, 
Jerry Olson 
Phoenix Zoo* 

Smokey the Bear - Woodsy the Owl 
Steve Prchal* 



PERSONAL IMPROVEMENT 
Pris Merlene 



POETRY READING/WORKSHOPS 



PUPPETEERS 

Flutterbys Puppets, Clair Radich* 
Great Arizona Puppet Theater, 
Nancy Smith* 

Dick Schick 
Phyllis Vogelsong 



SCIENCE 

Arizona Science Center 
Bill Herron 

Starlight Planetarium Productions, 



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RESOURCE PEOPLE | 



Brian DeWelles 



SIGN LANGUAGE 
Elaine Smith* 



SONG WRITERS 

Lon Austin 



STORY TELLERS 

John Abbott 

Aces Entertainment 

Dorothy Daniels Anderson 

Karen Black 

Lollie Butler 

K. E. Conway 

Jill Detter 

Don Doyle 

Pam Faro 

Dennis R. Freeman 
Harlynne Geisler 
Fatimah Abdul-Halim 
Judy Norman 
Anne Lee 
Carol Merrill 
Vi Meyer 
Gloria Meyers 
Ken Mikell 
Nita V. Norman 
Tony Norris 
Pat Oso 

Leticia Pizzino* 

David A. Riggs 
Martin Juan Rivera, Sr. 

Leslie Eve Ross 
Jeffrey Sadow 
Mary Ruth Shropshire 
Story Peddlers 

Were Storytellers, Russell Mann 
Joyce A. Story 
Diane Winslow 
Rosie Stevens Witcher 
Marge Fallon 
Roman Galvan 

STUNT TEAM 

Pro-Impact Stunt Team, Lance Lyons 

VARIETY ACTS 

Accent Entertainment, Larry Chebowski 
Aces Entertainment 
John Nolander 

Michael Steel _ 

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RESOURCE PEOPLE | 



Contact Person: 

Name: John Abbott 

Address: PO Box 187, Chino Valley, AZ 86323 

Telephone: (520) 636-2025 

Description of Performance: 

Professional storyteller tells adventure and ghost tales and legends of the Old West. Age level: Adult, 
Intermediate, Juvenile. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$350/Schools. Other negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona schools and libraries. 



Past Performances: 

Phoenix Pubic Library System; Scottsdale, Glendale and Mesa School Districts, museums, elder hostel 
and schools internationally. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 
e-mail: 



Accent Entertainment Inc, Larry Chebowski 

2111 South Industrial Park Avenue, Suite #106, Tempe, AZ 85282-1923 
(480) 967-7676 Fax: (480) 902-0669 

wheels @extremezone.com Web: www: accententertainment.com. 



Description of Performance: 

Entertainment service with a variety of acts, including catering and decorating. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Depends on entertainer. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

Various daycare’s, private birthdays, parades, fairs. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Aces Entertainment 

Address: 4505 N. 32nd Street Phoenix, AZ 85018 

Telephone: (602) 956-5102 ext. 15 Fax: (602) 956-7208 

Description of Performance: 

Storytellers: Mother Goose, Mrs. Santa Claus, Clown Band Lynn "win" Roberts (instrumental and 
vocal act) ethnic bands, country western. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Call for quotes. 



Travel Range: 

Anywhere in Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

City of Phoenix, Scottsdale Center for the Arts, Mesa Public Library, Scottsdale Public Library, 
Peoria Public Library, Chandler Public Library, Tempe Public Library. 



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RESOURCE PEOPLE 



Contact Person: 

Name: Penny Artio 

Address: 1053 E. Moon Vista, Apache Junction, AZ 85219 

Telephone: (480) 982- 6376 

Description of Performance: 

Formerly of AZ C.U.B.S. - Central United Bear Society. Presents educational programs about black 
bears in southwest and northern Arizona. Information includes what to do when a bear is encountered 
when camping or hiking. Uses video program, "Bear Aware". K-12 grade. Adult Education Programs 
also available. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

No fee charged. Mileage is negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

Negotiable. 

Past Performance: 

REI stores and libraries, schools, A.A.L.E. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Aloha Hoomalimali, Alice Stewart 

Address: 8155 E. Crescent Circle, Mesa, AZ 85208-4721 

Telephone: (480) 986-7293 or Beverly Ibbs (480) 830-8124 

Description of Performance: 

Performs dances from Polynesian Islands, including Hawaii, Samoa, New Zealand, and Tahiti with 
appropriate costumes. The Folksteppers, dances of all nations. The LUV clowns, variety shows. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$100/45 minutes to 1 hour program. 



Travel Range: 

Metro Phoenix area; usually no mileage. Can go to Flagstaff; Mileage fee. 

Past Performance: 

Twin Knoll Mobile Home Park, Val Vista Lakes, various nursing homes. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Dorothy Daniels Anderson 

Address: 4311 East Clarendon, Phoenix, AZ 85018 

Telephone: (602) 957-0462 or ddastory@worldnet.att.net 

Description of Performance: 

Professional author / storyteller: Dresses in costume and tells stories about Arizona in the "Olden 
Days." Stories are researched and written by D. Anderson. She will also speak to children about how 
she writes and tell how to get published. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Between $100-$300 per hour depending on distance and size of audience. Negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

All of Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

Phoenix Public Library, Douglas Public Library, Glendale Community College Schools; clubs; 
banquets; conventions ; Arizona State Library Association. 



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Contact Person: 

Name: The Arboretum of Flagstaff, Steve Yoder, Education Director 

Address: PO Box 670, Flagstaff, AZ 86002 

Telephone: (520)774-1442 

Description of Performance: 

Variety of programs and crafts relating to plants. Example: seed workshops. Theme centers around 
‘The Giving Tree” by Shel Silverstein. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Call for information. 



Travel Range: 

Northern Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

Flagstaff Public Library, Williams Public Library. Presented programs in Cottonwood, Show Low, 
Payson, Springerville and Gallup, NM. 



Contact Person: 

Name: The Arizona Historical Society Museum, Peg Kusner 

Address: 1300 N. College, Tempe, AZ 85281 

Telephone: (480) 929-0292 ext. 136 

Description of Performance: 

Living History Outreach Program. Historical character comes in costume with appropriate props and 
gives a 30 to 45 minute presentation. Characters include a mountain man, conquistador, Jack Swilling, 
Martha Summerhays, Lt. Henry Flipper, Lucy Luckett, Ranch woman, Tom Rynning, Sharlot Hall, 
Frances Willard Munds, Marshal Jack Allen, Addie Mae Carter, Nellie Cashman. Program is being 
expanded to include other characters. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$80 Phoenix metro area, and 300 per mile outside Phoenix area. Scholarship money available for rural 
outreach and at-risk audiences. Call for information. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 

Past Performances: 

Maricopa County Library System, Mesa Public Library, Chandler Public Library, Tempe Parks and 
Recreation. 

Contact Person: 

Name: Arizona Science Center 

Address: 600 E. Washington Street, Phoenix, AZ 85004 

Telephone: (602) 7 1 6-2000 or (602) 7 1 6-2026 Fax: (602) 7 1 6-2099 

Description of Performance: 

The Science Center offers outreach programs for students, teachers, and community groups. Student 
programs range from in classroom demonstrations on astronomy and chemistry to indoor / outdoor 
programs on science in the desert. Teacher programs are perfect for staff development and include 
topics such as Desert Science, Preschool Science, and Physical Science. The Science Center’s other 
educational resources and services include a Computer Clubhouse, Resource Department, and Mentor 
Program. 



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Fee Plus Mileage: 

Vary 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 

Past Performances: 

Glendale Public Library, Phoenix Public Library System, Tempe Public Library, Mesa Public Library. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Arizona Public Service Company, Carol Rosson 

PO Box 53999, Station 8418, Phoenix, AZ 85072 
(602) 250-3418 



Description of Performance: 

Electrical safety for elementary age children. Free kits for 1st through 4th grade; interactive lecture 
and video for 5 th grade. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Free within APS service territory. 



Travel Range: 

Within APS service territory. 



Past Performance: 

Public schools in Glendale, Phoenix, Wickenburg, Scottsdale, Avondale, Paradise Valley, Clarkdale, 
Jerome, Flagstaff, Globe, Miami. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Doris Asano 

Address: 1201 W. Seldon Lane, Phoenix, AZ 85021 

Telephone: (602) 997-0679 

Description of Performance: 

Origami, (creative paperfolding) 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Does not charge except for materials use. Mileage negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

Phoenix metro area. 



Past Performance: 

Dobson Ranch Library, Mesa Main Library, Arizona Museum for Youth, Phoenix Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Lon Austin 

Address: 7361 W. Mescal, Peoria, AZ 85345 

Telephone: (623) 979-8374 

Description of Performance: 

Songwriter, folksinger, and zen trained prevaricator. Can perform before all age groups. Lon and wife 
Sandra are also a resource for locating other valley area acoustic performers. Also performs with Dean 
Cook as Rust- “Arizona Raccoon Tours” and with Trail Dust, a group of 1 1 singers and storytellers. 
Gold Dust-Mining, Rail Railroad, songs, stories, poems. 



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Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable within Arizona. 

Travel Range: 

Phoenix Metro area. 

Past Performance: 

Sharlot Hall Museum Folk Festival, coffee houses, Peoria Public Library Folk Music series, campouts. 
Author / Storyteller. Bilingual and Multicultural Storytelling and Song, Love of Reading. Age level: 
Preschool, Intermediate. Publications: Pinata : Bilingual Songs for Children , (cassette/book.) Get 
Ready , Get Set, Sing! (cassette/book), / Was Walking Down the Road (English/Spanish) Todos , Listos, 
canten: canciones para ninos (cassette book) (cd book). $250 for 2 sessions. $300 for 3 sessions. 
Only occasionally. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Berta Benally 

Address: PO Box 1492, Flagstaff, A Z 86002 

Telephone: (520)527-1041 

Description of Performance: 

Native American Dance; Navajo Traditional and Intertribal Dance; Native American storytelling - 
winter time; Musical group - Black fire; School Residencies. Alter-Natives Jones Benally is first 
traditional consultant in the U.S. working with the Indian Health Service. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

International and U.S. 



Past Performance: 

(1994) Luther Burbank Center; Santa Rosa California; Mesa Libraries; World Soccer Finals; Festival 
Internationale (LA); Smithsonian Institute; Rome, Italy; Norway; East Germany; Ohio; California; 
Washington D.C. and many other places. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Karen Black 

Address: 5209 N. Tigua Dr., Tucson, A Z 85704 

Telephone: (520) 888-3926 



Description of Performance: 

Storyteller of farm life. Southwest tales, folk tales, ghost stories, and campfire stories for all ages. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 
Negotiable. 



Travel Range: 

Tucson only. 



Past Performances: 

Iowa Storytelling Festival, libraries, Tohono Chul Park, Amphitheater District schools, and churches. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Joan Bourque 

Address: PO Box 1112, Cornville, A Z 86325 

Telephone: 520-634-6606 FAX: 520-639-3483 



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Description of Performance: 

School & classroom presentations for grades 2 through 9. Topics include: Who is the Strangest 
Creature in the Sea? Ocean Environments, Island Life, Biodiversity in Our Oceans & in our Lives 
(shows kids they are as individual as the creatures in the ocean), Conservation. Author of Dreams of 
Dolphins Dancing. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$50.00 

Travel Range: 

Arizona 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Laurie Burke 

Pacific Roads Records 

2370 W. Hwy 89A, Ste 1 1-286, Sedona, AZ 86336 
(520)282-6617 



Description of Performance: 

Musical concert. Has own CD “Dream Songs” which is a collection of lullabies and children’s songs. 
Fee Plus Mileage: 

$150 in Phoenix or Flagstaff, outside of Phoenix or Flagstaff will be an additional fee for lodging and 
mileage. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona 

Past Performance: 

Flagstaff / Coconino County Library, Cottonwood Public Library, Sedona Arts Festival. Sedona 
Public Library. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Lollie Butler 

2046 E. 5th Street, Tucson, AZ 85719 
(520) 622-2046 



Description of Performance: 

Author / Storyteller. Topics: Dinosaurs, Animals, Native Americans. Age Level: Preschool, 
Intermediate, Teens. Publications: The Magical World of Dinosaurs, The Magical World of 
Prehistoric Animals. Articles in Ladybug and Cricket. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Figured on a sliding scale. Call for quote. 



Travel Range: 
Arizona. 



Past Performance: 

Tanque Verde Schools, Tucson Public Library, Children museums. Recipient of the Arizona 
Commission of the Arts Award. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Frank Cardamone 

825 Patrick Lane, Prescott, AZ 86303 
(520)717-1760 



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Description of Performance: 

Juggler & Juggling Workshops. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$50 within Yavapai County 



Travel Range: 

Yavapai County 

Past Performance: 

Cottonwood Public Library, Ash Fork Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Coconino County Dept, of Health Services, Injury Prevention 

Program 

Address: 2625 N. King Street, Flagstaff, AZ 86004 

Telephone: (520) 522-7871 



Description of Performance: 

" Safe Kids," contact Tricia Fortin. Bicycle safety, car seats, teen suicide prevention. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 
Free. 



Travel Range: 

Coconino County. 

Past Performances: 

Elementary schools, preschools. 



Contact Person: 



Name: 

Address: 

Telephone: 



Coconino County Sheriffs Department-Captain Terry Lawson 

PO Box 39, Flagstaff, AZ 86002 
(520) 774-4523 



Description of Performance: 

Hug-A-Tree program. Teaches children what to do if they become lost in the woods; how to make 
themselves "big" for helicopters and searchers; and about survival kits. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 
Free. 



Travel Range: 

Coconino County only. 

Past Performance: 

Flagstaff schools. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



K. E. Conway 

Sedona, AZ 86341 
(520) 284-1074 



Description of Performance: 

Preschool and up presentation on whales and dolphins including story 
anatomically correct models of whales, discussion and listening to sounds of 
also video tapes, if VCR is available. Arts and crafts. 



book, photo books, 
whales and dolphins- 



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Fee Plus Mileage: 

Small fee and mileage negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 



Past Performance: 

Sedona Public Library preschool story time with whale story, discussion, cassette taped whale sounds 
and baleen whale feeding demonstration. Cottonwood Public, Black Canyon Public, and Camp Verde 
Public Libraries, Prescott Library. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Susan Corl 

PO Box 898, Patagonia, AZ 85624 
(520) 394-2926 



Description of Performance: 

Children’s workshop on paper making, bookbinding for children, dolls, mask making and other crafts, 
puppets, gourds, Ukrainian egg decorating, com husk dolls, bead work, quilts, gardening, 
multicultural. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable for workshop, plus mileage, plus expenses. $200 a day. 



Travel Range: 

Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

Patagonia Public Library, Nogales, and Rio Rico Libraries. Very Special Arts Festival, Mesquite 
Grove Gallery, Artists in Residence throughout the state. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Jay Cravath 

Address: 10438 S. 45 Place, Phoenix, AZ 85044 

Telephone: (480) 893-1482 Fax: (480) 893-1482 

Description of Performance: 

Humanities scholar and multi-instrumentalist, Kokopelli, Music of Arizona Pioneers, Music and 
Culture of Arizona Native Americans, The Ballad of Arizona, 1000 years of Song-documentary and 
discussion. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Works through Arizona Humanities Council. Programs are offered free by a simple grant. Call AHC at 
(602) 257-0335. Roster artist for Arizona Commission on the Arts (602)-255-5882. Cravath will also 
contract directly with organization (480) 893-1482. 

Travel Range: 

Statewide 

Past Performance: 

Phoenix Art Museum, Scottsdale Center for the Arts, Yuma Crossing State Park, various Phoenix and 
Scottsdale branch libraries. 



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Contact Person: 

Name: DJ the Clown 

Address: PO Box 41955, Phoenix, AZ 85080 

Telephone: (602) 580-0834 

Description of Performance: 

Balloon sculpturing, pocket magic, magic shows, face painting, balloon bouquets, balloon decorating, 
mimes, Santa with a real beard, and more. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Varies according to performance. Programs starting at $75. Multiple hours, reduced rates. Mileage 
charged outside Phoenix metro area. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 

Past Performances: 

Glendale Public Library, Fort McDowell Library, Mesa Parks and Recreation, City of Tempe, City of 
Chandler, Douglas, Phoenix Parks & Recreation, Scottsdale Parks & Recreation, Dobson Ranch 
Public Library and many others. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Jill Detter 

Address: 1022 East Keim Drive, Phoenix, AZ 85014 

Telephone: (602) 274-8076 E-mail: Jdetter@nsl.lib.ei. 

Description of Performance: 

Storytelling: Folktales and Fairytales, Mother Goose Stories and Rhymes, Creative & Participation 
Drama, Stories from Around the World. Age level: Preschool, Intermediate, Juvenile. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 

Past Performances: 

Phoenix Public Library (Central and Branches); Shumway Public School, Chandler; Madison School 
District. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Don Doyle 

Address: 1903 E. Fairfield, Mesa, AZ 85203 

Telephone: (480) 833-3013 (480) 833-8988 

Description of Performance: 

Storyteller. Tells legends, folk traditions of the world cultures, Celtic stories, and personal experience 
stories. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$400/day for 45 minute program in Phoenix metro area; $400 plus mileage and expenses outside 
Phoenix metro area. 



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Travel Range: 

Arizona wherever needed. 

Past Performances: 

Phoenix Public Library, Mesa Public Library, Apache Junction Public Library, school libraries across 
the state, Arizona State Library Conference Fall '93. Exchange place teller, representing Western U.S. 
at Jonesboro Storytelling, Timponogas Storytelling Festival ‘97. Port Angeles Storytelling Festival 
’98. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Education Dept, of Planned Parenthood, Diane Dudley 

Address: 565 1 N. 7th Street Phoenix, AZ 85014 

Telephone: (602) 263-4244 

Description of Performance: 

National Family Sexuality Education Month Programs (October). Various programs in English and 
Spanish for parents and children. "Including Growing Up: What's Happening?" "How To Talk To 
Your Kids About Sex," and "Responsible dating," and "Safe Dating". Scheduled to do programs at 
various libraries throughout the year. Also have 3000 books on reproductive health care and have 
videos and other teaching aids available. Open to the public. (May) National teen pregnancy 
awareness month. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Free 

Travel Range: 

Maricopa County mostly but will travel to other areas. Flagstaff, Yuma, Globe, Prescott. 

Past Performances: 

Presentations in valley area schools, clubs, and various organizations. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Paul W. Estes of The Magicians 

Address: PO Box 66952, Phoenix, AZ 85082-6952 

Telephone: (602) 257-4261 

Description of Performance: 

Magic show and / or lecture / demonstration of principles of deception and / or magic workshop for 
youth or adults. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$150 Phoenix metro area. $200 outside Phoenix metro area. 



Travel Range: 

Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

Scottsdale Public Library, Glendale Public Library, Tempe Public Library, Mesa Public Library, 
Nogales Public Library, Peoria Public Library, Phoenix Public Library, Sierra Vista Public, 
Cottonwood Public Library, Camp Verde Public Library. 



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Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Marge Fallon 

The Myth Maker 
PO Box 958 
Sedona, AZ 86339 



Description of Performance: 

Storyteller - stories, tales & myths. 
Fee Plus Mileage: 

Call for current fees. 



Travel Range: 

Arizona 



Past Performance: 

Cottonwood Public Library, Sedona Public Library, Camp Verde Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Pam Faro 

Address: 310 1/2 Baseline Road, Lafayette, CO 80026 

Telephone: (303) 665-2721 or (602) 508-9331 

or c/o Mark Faro, 3521 E. Virginia Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85008 

Description of Performance: 

Multi-cultural tales, bilingual Spanish-English stories animal stories with music, math stories (one 
word), storytelling workshops, true story of great-uncle who survived the Titanic for 3rd grade and 
adult. Age level: Preschool, Intermediate, Juvenile, and grades 9-12 and adult. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$150 

Travel Range: 

Anywhere. 

Past Performance: 

Phoenix Public Library, Rocky Mt. Storytelling Festival, Kansas Storytelling Festival, Iowa 
Storytelling Festival, 1992 National Storytelling Festival in Tennessee. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Flutterbys Puppets, Clair Radich 

Address: 4638 N. 22nd Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 85015-4031 

Telephone: (602) 246-4043 

Description of Performance: 

Presents wide variety of puppet shows for children, many with a holiday theme. Gives workshops for 
children or adults to make and use puppets. Mother Goose characterization, will do strolling 
performances. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$50 for 30 minutes, with longer programs and workshops, fee negotiable. Mileage if outside Phoenix 
metro area. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 

Past Performance: 

Glendale Public Library, Casa Grande Library, Patagonia Elementary School, Whittier School- 
Phoenix, Desert Foothills Library. 



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Contact Person: 

Name: Folksteppers, Alice Stewart 

Address: 8 155 E. Crescent Circle, Mesa, AZ 85208-4721 

Telephone: (602) 986-7293 or Beverly Ibbs, (602) 830-8 124 



Description of Performance: 

Performs dances of all countries, "Trip Around the World," or will concentrate on one country. 
Performs Irish programs, Israeli Programs, Cinco de Mayo programs and Oktoberfest events. 
Scandanavian, May Day Events. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$100 for 45 minute to 1 hour program. 



Travel Range: 

Metro Phoenix area, usually no mileage; can go to Flagstaff, mileage fee. 

Past Performance: 

Twin Knolls Mobile Home Park, Val Vista Lakes, various nursing homes. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Dennis R. Freeman 

Address: Suite 377, PO Box 42036, Phoenix 85080-2036 

Telephone: (623) 465-7791 or Outside Phoenix Metro 800-653-1483 

e-mail: cuento@primenet.com 

Description of Performance: 

Storyteller, playwright. Topics include Southwest legends; personal narrative and world folklore. Oral 
historian, specializing in family stories. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$350 - $650 plus travel if required for one to three same day performances. Will consider lower fees 
for libraries. 



Travel Range: 

Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico. 



Past Performances: 

Artist in Education, Artist in Residence, Museum of Northern Arizona, Eastern Arizona College, 
Arizona Western College, Maricopa Community Colleges, Mohave Community College, Desert 
Caballeros Western Museum. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Roman Galvan 

3166 Gopher Rd., Chino Valley, AZ 86323 
(520) 636-8528 



Description of Performance: 

Multi-National Story Teller, Actor, Singer, Role Player. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$40.00 (1/2 to 1 hr. performance) + mileage (100 per mile) 



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Travel Range: 

Yavapai County - Northern Arizona 



Past Performance: 

Prescott-Asian; Pacific Legends; Camp Verde Public Library; Mayer Public Library; Cottonwood 
Public Library; Clarkdale Public Library; Flagstaff Public Library. Roundtable stories as Merlin; 
Chino Valley-2 years. Director of Summer Drama Program; also multi-lingual, sign singing, sfx make- 
up, shadow puppetry, Kabuki, Commedia and Greek theater experience. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Margaret K. Caraway 

Address: 3600 W. Mesa Ridge Trail, Tucson, AZ 85742-8841 

Telephone: (520)579-9321 

Description of Performance: 

Author. Writing workshops. Published: The Old Hogan; Ashkii y el abuelo\ Dezbah and the Dancing 
Tumbleweeds, The Teddy Bear Number Book, Los Numeros Con Ositis, and Of Hopes & Dreams 
(1913 Diary). Age level: Preschool, Intermediate, Juvenile. (Spanish / English Audio and paper.) 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$300 plus travel expenses and lodging if outside the Tucson area. 



Travel Range: 

Arizona & New Mexico 



Past Performance: 

Schools & Libraries throughout Arizona, University of Arizona, S.E.E.K. Program. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 
E-mail: 
Web: 



Harlynne Geisler 

5361 Javier Street, San Diego, CA 92117-3215 
(619) 569-9399 Fax: 619-569-0205 
storybag@juno.com or storybag@cts.com 
www.swiftsite.com/storyteller 



Description of Performance: 

Hauntingly true ghost stories. Riddle Me This: Asian tales; A Fiesta Of Folktales: Hispanic stories 
from New Mexico, Mexico, and Central America; Woof! Dog Tales Around the World For Kids; 
Highland Hauntings: Tales of Scotland; The Speaking of the Green: Irish tales. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

For $400 per day. Harlynne will perform at 3 libraries. 



Travel Range: 

Nationwide. 



Past Performance: 

Albuquerque, New Mexico (9 branches); Austin, Texas (6 branches); Illinois (7 cities); Sacramento 
Public Library; San Diego City Public Library System (26 branches); Tucson, AZ (2 branches); 
Oceanside Library Family Sleep-Over; Beverly Hills Library Family Storytelling Festival; Huntington 
Beach Library Carnival of Folk Tales; READ/San Diego’s Fifth Anniversary Celebration of Literacy. 



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Contact Person: 

Name: Great Arizona Puppet Theater 

Address: PO Box 7001, Phoenix, AZ 85011 

Telephone: (602) 262-2050 

Description of Performance: 

Extensive repertoire including fairytales; original shows; educational shows on environment, water 
conservation. Native American legends, endangered species. Puppet shows appropriate for 
preschoolers through adult and for both large and small audiences. Also performs Navajo and Chinese 
shadow stories. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$125-$450, 25tf per mile outside metro area. 

Travel Range: 

Travel throughout Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

The company performs thousands of performances each year at their theater and at libraries, schools. 
Churches, community centers, shopping centers, private homes, child care centers, the Desert 
Botanical Garden as well as the cities of Phoenix, Mesa, Chandler, Gilbert, and the Phoenix Zoo. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Fatimah Halim 

Address: 4133 N. 15th Drive, Phoenix, AZ 85015 

Telephone: (602) 230-0797 

Description of Performance: 

Author / Storyteller. Urban / Contemporary tales. Black History, Cultural Awareness, Self-Esteem, 
Kwanzaa. Her programs strive to foster harmonious relationships among groups. Published: 
Reflections: Black Women in History , and Kwaanza Workbook. Age level: Preschool, Intermediate, 
high school, adult. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$300/hour. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona, or outside of the state. 

Past Performance: 

Phoenix Public Library, Mesa Public Library, Cochise School, Herberger Theater, Phoenix Art 
Museum, Brazil, and Africa. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Sue Handke for Danny Handke 

Address: 8307 N. 85th Place, Scottsdale, AZ 85258 

Telephone: (480) 991-3131 

Description of Performance: 

A 16 year-old student, teaches kids to draw familiar cartoon characters such as Tweety Bird and Wyle 
E. Coyote. Also plays two games: 1) Create a Toon where the audience tells him where to place the 
lines and the finished product is one big character which is created from the kids own imagination and 
2) "Name that Toon" where Danny draws familiar cartoon characters and the kids must guess the 
character before he finishes. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

45 minutes presentation plus mileage. 



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Travel Range: 

Statewide. 

Past Performances: 

Taught cartooning at the Scottsdale Center for the Arts; Kids Camp at the Phoenician Resort; created 
logos for local businesses and his school; and has his own company called Fantast-a-Toons; Maricopa 
County Libraries; Page Public Library; Apache Junction Public Library; Showlow Public Library; and 
Phoenix Childrens Hospital. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Sue and Kyle Harris 

Address: 1502 E. Sunnyside Drive, Phoenix 85020 

Telephone: (602) 943-8645 

Description of Performance: 

Folksinger, Storytelling, AZ History tie-ins 

Fee plus Mileage: 

Varies, depends on number of shows and mileage. 

Past Performance: 

Peoria Public Library, Scottsdale Center for the Arts, Arts in Education, Charlotte Hall Folk Festival. 
Travel Range: 

Statewide 



Contact Person: 

Name: Heard Museum, Ed. Services; Gina Laczko 

Address: 2301 N. Central Avenue 

Telephone: (602) 252-8848 

Description of Performance: 

Speakers Bureau consists of slide / lecture presentations on a variety of Southwestern Native 
American themes with hands-on artifacts. Also available are small traveling exhibits on rain, Hopi 
Kachina Dolls, and a folk artist from Guatemala. Display is free standing and requires low security 
and minimum space. A variety of educational activities and information are available on the Internet. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Free. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 

Past Performances: 

Provided an exhibit on Rain as the Indians in the Southwest View It, and included both an adult 
speakers program with slides and a childrens program at the Gilbert Public Library, Heard 
Organization, and Apache Junction Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: B. G. Hennessy 

Address: 7837 N. 54th Street, Paradise Valley, AZ 85253 

Telephone: (480) 948-5288 



Description of Performance: 

Author. Published Jake Baked the Cake. Among others. Age level: Preschool, Intermediate. 



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Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

Negotiable. 

Past Performance: 

Arizona Reading Conference, Society of Children's Literature, Scottsdale Public Schools, Paradise 
Valley Schools. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Bill Herron 

Address: PO Box 17131, Tucson AZ, 85731 

Telephone: (520)733-7000 

Description of Performance: 

45-min. - 1 hour Science Shows, High energy entertainment introducing several concepts of science in 
an exciting manner. Great fun for children 5-12 years old. One hour workshops covering over 40 
subjects. Hands on where we bring the equipment and instructor and the children always make things 
and take something home. Children 5-12 years old. Full-day or half-day sessions that give 5-12 year 
old children hands on activities on a science subject/concept. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Science shows, $150. Workshops, $3.50 per child up to 35 children, minimum $90. Full-day, Half-day 
sessions, widely varies dependant on number of children, length of program equipment involved. 
Mileage: Ajo $30, Sells, Arivaca $15, Catalina, Green Valley, Three Points, Vail Sahuarita, $10, Oro 
Valley, Marana $5, Tucson, South Tucson, none. 

Travel Range: 

Southern Arizona. 

Past Performances: 

Over 50 elementary schools, All YMCA’s, 9 parks and Rec KIDCO sites, All Pima Parks and Rec 
sites, All Tucson Malls, Various Childcare Centers, Old Tucson Studios, Various Churches, 19 Pima 
County Libraries, bookstores and corporate events. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Mary Hollan 

Address: 1 1001 N 7th Street #1 176, Phoenix, AZ 85020 

Telephone: (602) 906-0377 Fax: (602) 906-0377 

Description of Performance: 

Musical performance enhancing children’s rhythm and musical ear. Singing and dance included. 
Disney music and folk songs. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Phoenix area ($150) plus $50 mileage. 

Travel Range: 

Green Valley to Flagstaff. 



Past Performance: 

Mesa Public Library and Branches, Glendale Pubic Library, Sedona Public Library, Tucson Public 
Library Branches, Tempe Public Library, Maricopa County Library Branches. 



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Contact Person: 

Name: Rich Howard Entertainment 

Address: 3502 N. 81st Street, Scottsdale, AZ 85251 

Telephone: (480)945-9193 

Description of Performance: 

Fast-paced music, magic and juggling. Lots of interaction with children. He invents musical 
instruments. He demonstrates the process of taking creative ideas and putting them into action. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Minimum $100 per show plus mileage and expenses. 



Travel Range: 
Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

Tolleson Public Library, Scottsdale Public Library, Douglas Public Library, Scottsdale School 
District, and Page Public Library. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Heather Irbinskas 

9415 E. Wrightstown Road, Tucson, AZ 85715 
(520) 298-2145 



Description of Performance: 

Author. Published: How Jackrabbit Got His Very Long Ears. Age level: Preschool. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

Statewide. 



Past Performance: 

Walter Douglas, Laguna, Rio Rico Schools, Arizona Young Authors Conference. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Diane Iverson 

Address: 2243 Mountain Oak Road, Prescott, AZ 86305 

Telephone: (520) 541-9304 

Description of Performance: 

Author of nature books. Shows research process to create her books with both slide and drawing 
demonstrations. Comes dressed in hiking gear. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$200 (includes mileage) for Yavapai County. 

$500 plus mileage for outside Yavapai County. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona 

Past Performance: 

Cottonwood Public Library, Chino Valley Library, Phoenix Public Library-Main branch, Abia Judd. 



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Contact Person: 

Name: Jolly Roger 

Address: 6801 E. Mescal Street, Scottsdale, AZ 85254 

Telephone: (480) 99 1 -4292 

Description of Performance: 

Children's entertainer. Presents magic, illusions, and educational program including story tricks. Also 
has a program that consists of games and competition. Longer shows, may include games, 
competitions, prizes. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

Anywhere. 

Past Performance: 

Maricopa County Libraries, Mustang Branch of Scottsdale Public Library, Apache Junction Public 
Library. 

Contact Person: 

Name: Kathryn Lance (pen name: Lynn Beach) 

Address: 3272 N. Glen Creek Dr., Tucson, AZ 85712 

Telephone: (520) 326-2555 Fax: (520) 326-2555 

Description of Performance: 

Author of Phantom Valley Series and hard cover book. Going to See Grassy Ella. 2 Ghost of Fear 
Street Books: Night of the Werecat and Caution: Aliens at Work. Will make author visits. Talks about 
writing process, about plots, and interacts with children. Reads from her books. Age level: 4-6th 
grade. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$50/class or negotiable. If outside of Tucson area must provide transportation. 

Travel Range: 

Tucson area. Will travel outside of Tucson area if transportation is provided. 

Past Performances: 

Tucson schools including Brichta Elementary School, Tanque Verde Elementary School, Fort Lowell 
Elementary School, Manzanita Elementary School and Mansfield Junior High, and many others. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Anne Lee 

Address: 7755 E. Edison, Tucson AZ. 

Telephone: (520) 751-1402 

Description of Performance: 

Storyteller of Multicultural Tales. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 

Past Performances: 

Various public libraries, Vail schools, Tucson Unified School District schools, and Tohono Chula 
Park. 

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Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Deanne Lewis RN, CMS 

650 Robinson Dr., Prescott, AZ 86301 
(520) 778*6473 



Description of Performance: 

"Historical Florence Nightingale" in costume, tells stories and answers questions about her life, her 
role in modern nursing, as a pioneer in statistics, setting new standards in military health, and 
challenging the traditional Victorian women's role. Appropriate for school age children and adults. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$75 * plus mileage. 



Travel Range: 

Arizona, as possible. 



Past Performance: 

Arizona Nurses Association State Convention, Chapter 5 AzNA, VA Medical Center Volunteers, 
Prescott Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Sylvia Long 

Address: 8502 E. Welsh Trail, Scottsdale, AZ 85258-1412 

Telephone: (480) 483-6181 



Description of Performance: 

Author and Illustrator. Has illustrated the following: Hush Little Baby ; Hawk Hill ; She does author 
signings, or some artwork design such as t-shirts, bookmarks, and postcards. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

No fee. Mileage fee for out of town. 



Travel Range: 

Phoenix and occasionally out of town. 



Past Performance: 

Designed T-shirts and postcards for Phoenix library. Participated in a show of original illustrations of 
children's books held at the Phoenix Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Cynthia Lukas 

Free Lance Writer 

Address: 8001 E. Paraiso Drive Scottsdale, AZ 85255 

Telephone: (480) 585-6180 

Description of Performance: 

Creative writing and how to get published by an author or teacher. Free lance writer of novels, keynote 
speaker at various programs for adults and youths, and teaches workshops in creative writing. 
Published Young Adult novel, Center Stage Summer for children ages 12- 14 years. Teaches writing at 
Paradise Valley Community College. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Standard fee for library program is $150 plus expenses, school appearance $200-300/day, educational 
conferences $250 and up or negotiable depending on circumstances. 



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Travel Range: 

Throughout Arizona, if travel expenses are paid. 



Past Performances: 

Taught at seminars and taught writing workshops for adults and young people. Most recently appeared 
in conjunction with Young Authors Week in elementary schools as a leader of workshops. Wrote 
stories that were published in newspapers and magazines, poetry, also published a novel. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Luv Clowns, Alice Stewart 

8155 East Crescent Circle, Mesa, AZ 85208-4721 
(480) 986-7293 



Description of Performance: 

Variety of programs including walk around magic tricks, face painting, toy balloon sculptures, 
puppets, ventriloquism, songs, dances, skits and audience participation. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$50 / clown for 2 hour program. 

Travel Range: 

Metro Phoenix area, generally no mileage, can go to Flagstaff, mileage fee. 

Past Performances: 

East Mesa branch of Mesa Public Library, Chandler Public Library, Toddler's Inn, Junior Village. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Lynn Lynton 

Fresh Thyme Productions 

PO Box 30224, Phoenix AZ 85046 

(602) 440-1074 (Phoenix), (520) 284-9317 (Sedona) 



Description of Performance: 

Musical concert. Has own CD ‘There’s a Dinosaur in My Backyard”. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Call for fees 



Travel Range: 

Arizona 



Past Performance: 

Cottonwood Public Library, Glendale Public Library, Scottsdale Center for the Arts & numerous 
Phoenix locations. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Thomas M. Marcellino 

Address: PO Box 4498, Apache Junction, Arizona 85278 

Telephone: (480) 984-6017 

Description of Performance: 

Available for Desert Awareness / Rattlesnake Behavior presentations. Past President of the 
International Venomous Snake Society. Owner, S.W. Rattlesnake exhibit. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$50 per hour. Minimum (1) hour. 



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Travel Range: 

East Valley 

Past Performance: 

Apache Junction Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Judy Norman 

Address: 7437 W. Acoma, Peoria, AZ 85381 

Telephone: (602) 979-4875 

Descr ip tion of Perfo r mance : 

Storyteller. Programs include, "Many Peoples, Many Places," "Serious Laughter." Some Spanish and 
Sign as well as English. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$75/40 minutes plus 250/mile over 50 miles plus expenses (or meals and lodging provided). 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 

Past Performances: 

Cochise County libraries, Peoria Public Library, Peoria School District, and Washington School 
District. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Carol Merril 

Address: 2202 N. Mohave, Chino Valley, AZ 86323 

Telephone: (520) 636-0982 

Description of Performance: 

Storytelling and traveling museum relating to Indian stories. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$50 plus transportation and lodging, if necessary. 

Travel Range: 

Northern Arizona. 

Past Performance: 

Chino Valley Library, Sedona Public Library, Flagstaff Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Mesa Youth Placement Service, Pris Merlene 

Address: 1025 N. Country Club Drive, Mesa, AZ 85201-3307 

Telephone: (480) 649-2150 Fax: (480) 649-211 1 

Description of Performance: 

Mesa Youth Placement Service is a community funded program providing workshops to students ages 
12-19, who live or attend school in the City of Mesa. The workshops are job seeking skills, resume 
writing, babysitting, and mock interviews. During the month of August we coordinate a “Junior High 
Jitters” workshop for students entering junior high school and their parents. This workshop helps with 
the transition of youth from elementary to junior high school. 




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Fee Plus Mileage: 

No charge. 

Travel Range: 

Boundaries of City of Mesa. 

Past Performances: 

Provide year round service to youths ages 12-19 in all Mesa Public Junior High and High Schools. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Vi Meyer 

Address: 6521 E. Shea Boulevard, Scottsdale, AZ 85254 

Telephone: (480) 948-6508 

Description of Performance: 

Storyteller, stories about the environment and how to care for it. Arizona history. Renaissance (with 
costume). Poetry (with storytelling). Age level: Preschool, Intermediate Juvenile. Also adult programs, 
perform historical characterizations for AZ Historical Society Museum. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$50 / class or $125 / assembly, multiple classes, negotiable. 



Travel Range: 

Arizona; beyond Phoenix (mileage, lodging). 



Past Performance: 

Payson Schools, Casa Grande Schools, Phoenix Valley Schools, ASU West, Community Colleges. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Gloria Meyers 

Address: 7 15 W. Congress, Tucson, AZ 85745 

Telephone: (520) 884-795 1 

Description of Performance: 

Storytelling for children and adults. Audience participation with songs, chants, movement and acting. 
Mostly African and African American stories. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$100 per 45 to 60 minutes session plus mileage and expenses outside Tucson metro area. 



Travel Range: 
Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

Mission Pubic Library, tutor / advisor for Tucson Unified School District African American studies. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Jan Mike 

Address: 1 118 S. Mann Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85710 

Telephone: (520) 790-0732 

Description of Performance: 

Author of 28 books: Desert Seasons , Gift of the Nile, Opossum and the Great Firemaker and cut and 
color paper doll books about Indians tribes of Arizona. Writing workshops, children to adult. 



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Fee Plus Mileage:* 

Negotiable plus mileage and expenses. 

Travel Range. 

Southern Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

Tucson schools, Phoenix Public Library, Panelist Southwest Authors' Conference, and Society of 
Children's Book Writers and Illustrators. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Ken and Lynne Mikell 

1285 Meadow Lane, Cottonwood, AZ 86326 
(520) 634-6464 



Description of Performance: 

Traditional Western music and Cowboy poetry, with attention to the Celtic and European origins of 
Western music. Music and poetry of the rest of the West (non-cowboy). Storytelling. Harp and guitar. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$100-$500. Expenses negotiated. 



Travel Range: 

Have guitar, will travel Arizona (call). 



Past Performances: 

Coconino Center for Arts, Desert Botanical Gardens, Prescott Folk Festival, Arizona Storytellers 
Conference, Arizona Cowboy Poetry Gathering, Sierra Vista Poetry Gathering, performed for Phoenix 
Boys Choir, presenter at Yavapai Community College and NAU Elder hostels. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Dale E. Miller - Society of American Magicians 

Address: 2348 Tee Dr., Lake Havasu City, AZ 86406 

Telephone: (520)453-1309 

Description of Performance: 

Magic show geared towards children of all ages. 

Fee plus Mileage: 

No program fee for libraries - contact for mileage fee & housing fee if required. 

Travel Range: 

Mohave & La Paz Counties. 

Past Performances: 

Charles C. Royall Memorial Library (Lake Havasu City), Ash Fork Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Mohave County Cooperative Extension 

Address: 101 E. Beale St., Kingman, AZ 86401 

Telephone: (520) 753-3788 

Description of Performance: 

Contact the following people for program information: Jerry Olson, 4-H; Robin Grumbles, agriculture; 
Lynne Durrant, family and consumer education. 



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Fee Plus Mileage: 

No program fee, contact for mileage. 



Travel Range: 

Mohave^County. 



Past Performances: 

Mohave County Library District, Charles C. Royall Memorial Library (Lake Havasu City), and 
various other libraries and schools throughout Mohave County. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Museum of Northern Arizona 

Address: 3101 N. Fort Valley Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 

Telephone: (520) 774-5211 ext. 220 

Description of Performance: 

Puppet shows, docent led programs on archeology, pottery, rock art and prehistoric technologies. 
Includes a hands on activity. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$2.00 per child. 



Travel Range: 

Flagstaff & Verde Valley area. 



Past Performance: 

Flagstaff Public Library, Cottonwood Public Library, Arizona Book Festival in Phoenix. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Music Performance Trust Funds; Phoenix Federation of 

Musicians, Ted Alan, Administrator 

Address: 1202 E. Oak St., Phoenix, AZ 85006 

Telephone: (602) 254-8838 

Partially subsidizes any public performance statewide including libraries, schools, and parks. Will 
refer to area musicians. Hours: Monday and Thursday 1-4 p.m. 



Contact Person: 

Name: John Nolander, “Uniquely Speaking” 

Address: 2948 Quail Run Dr., Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 

Telephone: (520) 459-8339 

Description of Performance: 

Rollicking library programs for children using ventriloquism, magic, comedy and audience 
participation. The program emphasize the promotion of reading and use of libraries. All props and 
equipment are provided. Renaissance stories with magic. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Program length, content and fees negotiable based on performance and library needs. Travel fees 
negotiable. Call for exact price. 



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Travel Range: 

Statewide. 

Past Performances: 

Sierra Vista Public Library, Copper Queen Library, Nogales Library, Tubac Library, Rio Rico 
Library, Benson Library, Douglas Library, Sierra Vista elementary schools, Willcox schools. Gaslight 
Theatre in Tucson, Society of American Magicians-Stars of Magic 1995, Center for Substance Abuse- 
Vecinos Border Project. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Nita Norman 

Address: 1513 W. Culver, Phoenix, AZ 85007 

Telephone: (602) 271-9216 

Description of Performance: 

Storyteller. Multicultural stories. English / Spanish, English / Filipino. Storytelling Workshops. Age 
level: Preschool, Intermediate, Juvenile. Tortoise story and Show & Tell tortoise visit and crafts. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$75 (negotiable) + mileage if over 20 miles. 



Travel Range: 

Arizona. 



Past Performance: 

Elementary schools and libraries throughout the state including Tucson, Phoenix, and Flagstaff. 
Telebration delegate to China. National Storytelling Association. Artist in Residence. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Tony Norris 

Address: 9475 Doney Park Lane, Flagstaff AZ 86004 

Telephone: (520) 526-6684 

Description of Performance: 

Storyteller & Music (Guitar). Programs for children and adults that utilize song, story and poetry. 
Subjects include Arizona history and characters, cowboy stories, songs and poetry, folk tales and 
personal stories. Folktales of the Southwest, Mexico & Native Americans and Appalachian Program. 
Workshops on storytelling. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$100 approximately per program and mileage. 



Travel Range: 

Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

Sharlot Hall Folk Festival; Encanto Park Folk Festival; National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, Elko, 
Nevada; various Arizona school systems. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Grace O'Dair 

1121 Shullenbarger Dr., Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (Grace O'Dair) 
(520) 774-4187 (Grace O'Dair) 



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Description of Performance: 

Stories for all ages, some with musical accompaniment, participation stories, workshops for peer 
counseling groups and teachers. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

Northern Arizona. 

Past Performances: 

Coconino Center for the Arts, state conferences, elementary and high schools and libraries in Utah, 
Idaho, and AZ. NAU workshop with therapy counseling. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Remi Ogunsile 

Address: 8629 W. Encanto Blvd. Phoenix, AZ 85037 

Telephone: (602) 907-2744 

Description of Performance: 

Traditional African Story Telling: Animals / Domestic / Morals. 
Fee Plus Mileage: 

$150 plus Lodging and Transportation. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 

Past Performances: 

Flagstaff Middle School, Phoenix Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Pat Oso 

Address: 1215 W. 1st Place, Mesa, AZ 85201 

Telephone: (480) 890-0792 

Description of Performance: 

Storytelling and workshops in storytelling techniques; multicultural folktales; Tall Tales; myths and 
legends; morality stories/values lessons; interactive stories. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable - will work with budgets. 

Travel Range: 

Throughout Arizona. Possibly out of state. 

Past Performance: 

Villa Montessori School, Arizona Childcare Association; Oasis Intergenerational Tutors, National 
Montessori Conference, many schools, teachers conference, parent groups, fund raisers. Mill Avenue 
Art Festival, and Artist in Residence Programs, International Education conference on the full 
potential of the child in Colombia and Ecuador, South America. 




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Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Lorrain Ovaitt 

PO Box 321, Chino Valley, Arizona 86323 
(520) 636-0675 



Description of Performance: 

Storytelling - all ages. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$50 plus $.25 per mile. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona 



Past Performance 

I have told stories to elementary school classes as a college student at C.S. Mott Community College 
in Flint, Michigan. I also told stories to college students in Flint, Michigan. At the request of many 
different schools, I returned to tell stories and to read stories as well as poetry to students. While living 
in Newport, Oregon area I was part of many public poetry and story readings. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Steve Parker, Commercial Artist 

Address: 18317 E. Riverway Avenue, Greenacres, Washington 99016-9361 

Telephone: (509)927-7339 

Description of Performance: 

Cartooning workshops for children. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$185 first hour. More than one group, $150. 

Travel Range: 

Will travel to Arizona if group of libraries can arrange multi-programs. 

Past Performance: 

Scottsdale Public Library, Mesa Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Sheila Pattison 

Address 9020 E. Saddleback Drive, Tucson, AZ 85749 

Telephone: (520) 749-4375 

Description of Performance: 

Storyteller of ghost stories, Irish stories, and campfire stories for preschool through adult. 
Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable plus mileage and expenses. 

Travel Range: 

Southern Arizona 

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Past Performance: 

Tucson Public Library, schools, and conferences. 




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Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 
URL: 



K. J. Illusion, Kimberly Phelps 

PO Box 5042, Mesa, AZ 85210 
(480) 833-4014 

http://www.indirect.com/www/kayne/kj.html 



Description of Performance: 

Magic shows, entertainment and illusions for ages 5 and older. 
Fee Plus Mileage: 

$85 for first 30 minutes, $95 + mileage for one hour. 

Travel Range: 

Phoenix Area. 

Past Performance: 

Edison School, Foothills Library, Gilbert Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Phoenix Irish Step Dancers, Sharon Judd 

Address: 15 South 20th Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 85009 

Telephone: (602) 253-1978 

Description of Performance: 

Perform all varieties of traditional Irish dance: Ceili, solo figure dances 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$250. 

Past Performance: 

Chandler Public Library, performs throughout Arizona. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Phoenix Zoo 

Aimee Barwegen 

455 N. Galvin Pkwy, Phoenix AZ 85008 
(602) 273-1341 



Description of Performance: 

Coupons and promotionals for the zoo. Call above number to see what is available. 
Fee Plus Mileage: 

$8.50 adults. $7.50 seniors, $4.25 children. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 
e-mail: 
Web: 



Leticia Pizzino, Storyteller (Jeff Manager) 

PO Box 1282, West Jordan, UT 84084-1282 

1-800-669-7533 (brochure, reviews, and references sent upon request) 

stories@ieighty.net 

www.ieighty.net/~stories 



Description of Performance: 

Leticia is available to present a special storytelling program to coincide with the 2000 summer reading 
program “Read From Sea to Shining Sea” Being a professionally-trained singer/musician, she 
enhances her storytelling with songs and music. Leticia offers a variety of programs, all described in 
her informational packet. Her vast repertoire gives her stories for any occasion or age. 




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Fee Plus Mileage: 

$95 for a 45-minute program plus a nominal travel expense. 

Travel Range: 

Leticia is willing to travel throughout the state. 

Past Performance: 

In July 1998 she was invited to perform at 7 Arizona libraries. Since 1995, Leticia has logged more 
than 50 performances at libraries throughout the state. She also performs at numerous schools and 
bookstores during each of her visits. She travels regularly and has also toured Wisconsin, California, 
Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Utah. In addition, Leticia has performed at the Utah State 
Fair and the annual Timpanogos Storytelling Festival (one of the premier storytelling events in the 
nation). 



Contact Person: 

Name: Steve Prchal, Cindy Prestwood, Sonoran Arthropod Studies 

Address: PO Box 5624, Tucson, AZ 85703 

Telephone: (520) 883-3945 Fax : (520) 883-2578 

Description of Performance: 

Educational programs focusing on insects, arachnids and other arthropods. Programs utilize models, 
graphics and living arthropods. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$100 per day plus mileage; 300 per mile. 



Travel Range: 

Southern Arizona, including Phoenix area. 



Past Performance: 

Tucson area: local school districts, day care centers, after school programs, summer day camps; 
Nogales Library; Sierra Vista. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Presto Magic Studio, Barry Schor 

Address: 1550 E. University, Suite R, Mesa, AZ 85203 

Telephone: (480) 464-45 1 8 

Description of Performance: 

Professional magician specializing in family entertainment. Teaches magic to school age children ages 
6-12 years in one time two hour class. Performs at parties, banquets, fund raisers. Bar Mitzvahs, 
conventions. Presto Magic is also a full service magic store. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Cost per student $5.00 (for classes). Library programs negotiable. 



Travel Range: 
Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

Glendale Community College, Washington School District, Apache Junction Public Library, Chandler 
Public Library, Scottsdale Public Library, Jewish Community Center, Mesa Public Library 



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Contact Person: 

Name: Pro-Impact Stunt Team, Lance Lyons 

Address: PO Box 2645, Tempe, A Z 85280-2645 

Telephone: (480) 858-0211 

Description of Performance: 

Bicycle-Skateboard-Rollerblade demonstration. Needs parking lot or basketball court sized area. The 
"Thrill Speakers" gain audience attention then speak on drugs resistance, goal setting, and staying in 
school. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$550-$650. Price depends on number of shows performed in a day. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona, traveling expenses outside Phoenix Metropolitan area. 



Past Performances: 

Over 100 school assemblies and entertainment. Traveled all over the country; featured on discovery 
channel and Fox Real TV; several members are stars of ESPN’S X games. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Puppet Pizzazz, Joy Wade or Joyzelle Curtis 

Address: 1405 E. 3rd Place, Mesa, A Z 85203 

Telephone: (480) 833-5577 or (480) 340-7510 

Description of Performance: 

Experience Arizona in a unique way! Large size Marrionettes, Puppeteers and Ventriloquists will sing 
and dance their way into your hearts along with full size saguaro cacti and a whole array of western 
characters other shows available: Seasonal-Storybook-Circus-variety and more State wide 
performing. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$150.00 

Travel Range: 

Anywhere in Arizona with a modest pre-arranged travel allowance. 

Past Performance: 

Puppet making Workshop plus “Hansel & Gretel” for the State Librarians Convenion. “Little Red 
Riding Hood” for State Fair, Kid’s Connection and many libraries. “Pandemonium” and ecology show 
for libraries and shopping malls. “Puppet Circus” for many libraries and other events. “Pinocchio and 
Friends” events throughout Arizona. These programs are also currently available. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Quintessence Chamber Ensemble, Jill Marderness 

Address: PO Box 56642, Phoenix, AZ 85079 

Telephone: (602) 483-9430 

Description of Performance: 

Woodwind quintet performs for children and adult special events. Program include "Let Us Show 
You," "Just Imagine”, "Take Me to the Zoo." Integrates music with science, math and art. 
Demonstrates instruments. (Available September through May). 



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Fee Plus Mileage: 

Available upon request. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 

Past Performance: 

Kerr Cultural Center, various public schools. 



Contact Person: 

Name: David A. Riggs 

Address: 4602 E. Paradise Village Parkway North #A204, Phoenix, AZ 85032 

Telephone: (480) 996-6715 

Description of Performance: 

Storyteller. British, Irish, International Folktales, Fairy tales, and Legends. Age level: All levels. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona (Beyond Phoenix travel + lodging expenses). 

Past Performance: 

Sunrise Middle School, North Ranch Elementary, Mesa S.W. Museum, Gilbert Public, Mesa AZ 
Renaissance Festival. Roster Artist, AZ Commission of the Arts. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Martin Juan Rivera, Sr. 

Address: PO Box 36734, Tucson, AZ 85740-6734 

Telephone: (520) 544-4533 

Description of Performance: 

Bilingual Storyteller. Tells stories from the Southwest, Native American tales, and scary stories. 
Spanish / English. Age level: All ages. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$75 / hour plus mileage and expenses outside of Tucson. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 

Past Performances: 

Tolleson Public Library; Littleton School District; Liberty School District; Nogales Public Library; 
Cochise County Public Library; Gilbert School District; Tucson Unified School District #1; Tucson- 
Pima Library; Sunnyside School District #12; Rio Colorado Primary School in San Luis; Sommerton 
School in Sommerton; Albuquerque Story Fiesta and Silver City, N. M. Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: "Loca Rosa" a.k.a. Tish Dvorkin 

Address: 8043 East Irwin Avenue, Mesa AZ 85208 

Telephone: (480) 986-6016 Fax: (480) 986-7545 

Description of Performance: 

"Loca Rosa" performs in costume, plays guitar, lute and balalaika and frame drum. Specializes in 
Eastern European multi-ethnic folk tales & music especially Russian/Jewish cultures. (Arizona 
Commission on the Arts roster Artist 1993-2000.) 




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Fee Plus Mileage: 

Inside greater Phoenix area (50 mile radius) fees range from $150 to $400+. Outside greater Phoenix 
area fee negotiable with mileage 350 per mile less first 50 miles each round trip; food/lodging, $60 per 
day. 

Travel Range: 

Anywhere. 

Past Performances: 

Mesa Public Library; Scottsdale Public Library; Tempe Public Library; Gilbert Public Library; 
Chandler Public Library; Glendale Public Library; Peoria Public Library; Mesa Public School Fine 
Arts Tour; Scottsdale Community College; Glendale Community College; Artist in Residence 
programs at many Arizona schools. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Leslie Eve Ross - Gloriana Queen of the Fairies 

Address: 4743 N. 21st Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85015 

Telephone: (602) 242-6067 

Description Of Performance: 

Unique and original storytelling. Also, “Mother Nature”, “Betsy Ross”, a children’s program with 
stage play, an adult program and a Christmas Program. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Gloriana Program $150; Mother Nature Program $100; Betsy Ross Program $75; plus $.35 per mile 
from Central Phoenix. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona 

Past Performances: 

Cottonwood Public Library Summer Reading Program- 1997 (well received by the children). 
Statewide: Many promotions, grand openings, schools, hospitals fund raisers. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Jeffrey Sadow 

8413 E. Wilshire Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85257 
(480) 990-8605 



Description of Performance: 

Multi-ethnic storytelling with music and instruments. Flexible and will adapt to needs of libraries. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable. 



Travel Range: 

Loves to travel Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

Glendale Public Library, Scottsdale Public Library, Arizona Library Association, Sierra Vista Public 
Library, Apache Junction Public Library, Prescott Public Library, East Flagstaff Community Library, 
Sedona Public Library, Forest Lakes Public Library, Pine Public Library, Bagdad Public Library and 
Mayer Public Library, Pima Public Library, Duncan Public Library, Show Low Public Library. 



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Contact Person: 



Name: 

Address: 

Telephone: 



Joan Sandin 

2340 E. 4th St., Tucson, AZ 85719 
(520) 881-4481 



Description of Performance: 

Author/Illustrator of Hill of Fire; Snowshoe Thompson, The Long Way Westward; The Long Way to a 
New Land ; series about a Swedish family's immigration; As the Crow Flies; Pioneer Bear. Translated 
the Linnea books from Swedish to English. Prefers small groups. Workshop type presentation: Traces 
a book from idea to finished product, showing original sketches and illustrations. Audience 
participation. Illustrated a reissue of Nathaniel Benchley's Small Woof and A Bear for Miguel. Age 
level: Preschool, Intermediate. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$400/day plus mileage. 



Travel Range: 

Preferably Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

Schools, teacher's and librarian's conferences, speaker at Arizona State Library Association and the 
International Reading Association Regional Conference. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Dick Schick 

1869 North Ellis, Chandler, AZ 85224-7810 
(480) 838-1608, (W) (480) 838-4043 



Description of Performance: 

Marionette show and magic show. Uses an anti-drug theme. Marionettes do tricks (Vaudeville). Lots 
of audience participation; hypnosis. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$200 1st show, price is adjusted for additional shows. Mileage fee. 



Travel Range: 
Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

Chandler Public Library, Phoenix Public Library, Tempe Public Library, Gilbert Public Library, major 
fairs in State. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Susan Seats 

Address: 4554 E. Paradise Village Parkway North, Apt. 168, Phoenix, AZ 85032 

Telephone: (602) 996-4363 

Description of Performance: 

Performs as well as teaches magic. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Charge $75 mileage; $10 for supplies; mileage charged for show 15 miles or more. 




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Travel Range: 

Maricopa County. 



Past Performances: 

Has done volunteer shows at schools and nursing homes; taught coping skills at schools; and 
performed on the Jerry Lewis MDA, Illinois Chapter telethon in 1987. State and National 
Conventions. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Mary Ruth Shropshire 

Address: 6734 N. Chapultepec Circle, Tucson, AZ 85750 

Telephone: (520) 529-1161 



Description of Performance: 

Author / Storyteller. Southwestern stories. Folktales. Age level: Preschool through seniors. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 
Negotiable. 



Travel Range: 

Arizona. 



Past Performance: 

Civic Organizations, preschools through high schools. Churches, and various community activities; 
charter member and past president of ‘Tellers of Tales”; Co-Chairman for 3rd annual Arizona 
Storytellers Conference- 1988. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Elaine Smith 

Address: 1417 E. Kramer Street, Mesa, AZ 85203 

Telephone: (480) 962-4908 

Description of Performance: 

Teaches manual alphabet and basic vocabulary in sign. Will do a demonstration by teaching 
participants to sign a song. Will teach classes of 2 hours for 6 weeks; maximum of 7-10 students per 
class. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$25 for a demonstration; $10 per students for 6 week class. 



Travel Range: 

East Valley. 



Past Performance: 

Leads signing clubs and serves as an interpreter for the hearing impaired. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Smokey the Bear, Woodsy the Owl-U.S. Forest Service, Coconino 

National Forest, Karen Malis Clark 

Address: Peaks Ranger Station, 5010 N. Hwy. 89, Flagstaff, AZ 86004 

Telephone: (520) 527-3492. Call between 7:30 - 4:30, Monday through Friday. 

Description of Performance: 

Smokey the Bear and puppets present programs on camping safety and fire prevention. 30 minute 
program for preschool through 3rd grade. 



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Fee Plus Mileage: 

No fee 

Travel Range: 

Northern Arizona - will refer to local offices if outside Flagstaff. All invitations depend on availability 

Past Performances: 

Flagstaff Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Society for Creative Anacronism 

Alan Shaw, State Coordinator 
Address: PO Box 317, Mesa, AZ 85211 

Telephone: (480) 962-6355 



Description of Performance: 

Demonstration of arts, crafts, sciences, or fighting of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Free to local libraries/schools. Donations accepted. 



Travel Range: 

Local groups. Mr. Shaw can put you in contact with a group in your area. Prescott, Kingman, 
Flagstaff, Parker, Lake Havasu, Casa Grande, Globe, Sierra Vista, Yuma. 

Past Performances: 

Mesa Public Library, Charles C. Royall Memorial Library, Chandler, Phoenix, Mesa, Scottsdale 
Elementary, Middle and High Schools. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 
e-mail: 



Southwest Brass, Russ Plylar 

231 1 W. Windrose Drive, Phoenix, AZ 85029 
(602) 997-998 1 Fax: (602) 997-9982 
s wbrass @ amug . org 



Description of Performance: 

You will find that our 3 musical/slide show offerings are perfect for any size performance room. Titles 
are Jurassic Brass , Star Quest , and Howl With the Wolves. Each show contains unique descriptive 
music, performed by 2 live trumpeters and customized sound track, entertaining and interactive 
narration, as well as engaging slides obtained from museums, NASA, and various national parks and 
state agencies. The shows are flexible in length and can last from 25 minutes to 40 minutes. These 
shows are very effective for pre-school - 6th grade and their families. All three of these shows work 
well to stimulate interest in reading about dinosaurs, astronomy, and the environment. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$250 + 25 cents a mile outside of Phoenix area. 



Travel Range: 

Statewide and regional. 



Past Performance: 

Phoenix Public Library System - all branches, Scottsdale Public Libraries - various, Glendale Public 
Library, Mesa Public Libraries - main branch. East Mesa Branch, Dobson Branch. 



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Contact Person: 

Name: Starlight Planetarium Productions, Brian DeWelles 

Address: 7406 W. Paradise Dr., Peoria, AZ 85345 

Telephone: (623) 486-0102 

Description of Performance 

Informative and entertaining sky show put on with professional equipment at your location. Brings 
own video projection system and portable planetarium dome. Shows can be designed for any age 
group. Myths and legends of constellations. Special holiday program in December on the Star of 
Bethlehem. Telescope viewing w/large astronomical telescope. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$79.50 for 45 minute show, each additional show on the same day $69.50 per show. $129.00/2 hr. 
session with telescope. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 

Past Performances: 

Apache Junction Public Library, Phoenix Public Library System, Maricopa County Library branches. 
Many other county and city libraries. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Michael Steele 

Address: 180 Verde Street, Clarkdale, AZ 86324 

Telephone: (520) 634-7985 

Description of Performance: 

45 minute show consisting of magical illusions, professional yo-yo demonstration, juggling, and live 
music (“Name that Tune” game on flute). 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Minimum: $120 plus mileage outside Verde Valley. $60 inside Verde Valley. 



Travel Range: 

Northern Arizona, no further South than Phoenix. 



Past Performances: 

Glendale Public Library, Peoria Public Library, Cottonwood Public Library, Sedona Public Library, 
Camp Verde Public Library 



Contact Person: 

Name: Jan Romero Stevens 

Address: 3425 S. Carol, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 

Telephone: (520) 774-261 1 

Description of Performance: 

Author of bilingual stories and presents Writing Workshops. Published: Carlos and the Squash Plant ; 
Carlos and the Cornfield ; and Carlos and the Skunk. Does solo presentations and joint presentations 
with bilingual storyteller, Fred Salazar. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$500/day plus 200/mile. 



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Travel Range: 

The Southwest. 



Past Performance: 

Writing workshops at Phoenix College and U of A and story presentations at schools throughout 
Arizona and Southern New Mexico. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Joyce A. Story 

Address: 418 Sagebrush Street, Litchfield Park, AZ 85340 

Telephone: (623) 935-1685 or (623) 435-3686 E-mail:STOR Y@GC.MARICOPA.EDU 



Description of Performance: 

Storyteller. Slavic and Hispanic Folktales and Legends. Age level: Juvenile. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$50 / hour. 



Travel Range: 

Phoenix area. 



Past Performance: 

Glendale Community College, Renaissance Festivals, Elementary and high schools. 



Contact Person: 

Name: String Sounds, Susan Smith 

Address: 3944 East Oak Street, Phoenix, AZ 85008 

Telephone: (602) 275-7790 

Description of Performance: 

String quartet. They play music around a theme that combines children’s books with music; for 
example, Books That Make Us Laugh. Uses props including poster illustration for each book. 30 
minutes. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Mileage and expenses included in fee and calculated by Music Performance Trust Fund. 

Travel Range: 

Anywhere in Arizona, unless too far to be cost effective. 



Past Performances: 

Chandler Public Library, Apache Junction Public Library, Prescott Public Library, Miami Memorial 
Library, Globe Public Library, Gilbert Public Library, Phoenix Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Stan Tang 

Address: 5201 N. 24th St. #105, Phoenix, AZ 85016 

Telephone: (602) 553-8166 

Description of Performance: 

Freelance illustrator and cartoonist. Will teach techniques on cartooning, illustration, and basic 
drawing in a fun and humorous session, (minimum 1 hr. session). 



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Fee Plus Mileage: 

$45 an hour. Mileage and fee included in workshop within Maricopa County. Will consider workshops 
outside of Maricopa County if mileage or accomodations are provided. 



Travel Range: 

Phoenix Metropolitan Area or location within a two hour drive. 



Past Performance: 

Phoenix Central Public Library and its branches. Chandler Public Library, Sedona Public Library, 
Cottonwood Public Library, Mesa Public Library, Tempe Public Library, Scottsdale Public Library, 
Buckeye Elementary, Kyrene Middle School, All Saints Episcopal School, Channel 10 morning news 
(Fox Affiliate), and other valley locations. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Laurie Vela 

Address: PO Box 2211, Aptos, CA 95001 

Telephone: 1-800- ABC-4974 

Description of Performance: 

Bookteller, Author, Illustrator, Performer. Perform with interactive program that features big books, 
rhymes, and songs. These all original materials set characters like the color cloud and action ants in a 
vast variety of themes. Shows come with audio and written materials including bookmarks and a 
promotional color poster. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$175.00 Block Booking only (More than 1 show). (Fee variable). 



Travel Range: 

Unlimited. 



Past Performance: 

Touring library schools in both East & West Coast for 5 years. Nevada Library Association. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Phyllis Vogelsong 

Address: 5729 W. Purdue Circle, Glendale, AZ 85302 

Telephone: (623) 934-4206 

Description of Performance: 

Awareness Issues: Special needs focused puppet show for school-age children. "The Kids On the 
Block" is a troupe of puppets whose purpose is to help school-age children understand the special 
needs of those around them. Many of the puppets face such challenges as blindness, leukemia and 
mental retardation and other social issues. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Donation $50. 

Travel Range: 

Phoenix Metro Area, and other valley locations. 

Past Performance: 

Local schools and libraries. 



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Contact Person: 

Name: Allan Wade 

Address: 827 E. 6th Ave., Mesa, AZ 85204 

Telephone: (480) 962-4426 

Description of Performance: 

He presents shows of parlor magic or illusions for small groups, assisted by family members. He also 
does balloon figures and marionette puppet shows. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

$85 for 30 minute show of magic and illusions; $50 for first hour of balloons, $35 each additional 
hour; $125 for 40 min. puppet show. 



Travel Range: 

Primarily Metro Phoenix area but will travel statewide. 



Past Performance: 

Summer programs in Casa Grande and Coolidge. Programs in Mesa, Tempe and Chandler public 
schools. Mesa libraries, high school and elementary schools statewide, and special occasion’s/private 
parties for all ages. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Dorothy Hines Weaver 

Address: 4639 W. Shaw Butte Drive, Glendale AZ 85304 

Telephone: (623) 938-7672 



Description of Performance: 

Author of Arizona A to Z and New Mexico A to Z. She makes school visits about the book libraries. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

$ 100/half day. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 



Past Performances: 

Schools throughout Arizona. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Fran Weissenberg 

Address: 3041 N. Willow Creek Drive, Tucson, AZ 85712 

Telephone: (520) 881-5827 

Description of Performance: 

Author of The Streets are Paved with Gold , a natural sequel to Fiddler on the Roof \ the story of an 
immigrant growing up in the melting pot of Brooklyn. Articles about bibliotherapy: Cherish your 
Memories , Immigrants in History , Family. Received the Sidney Taylor Award from the Association of 
Jewish Libraries. Age level: Intermediate, Juvenile. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Fee negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

Tucson area. 



Past Performances: 

Copper Creek School (Tucson), Pima Retired Teacher’s Association, Synagogues. 



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Contact Person: 

Name: We're Storytellers, Russell Mann 

Address: 59 Pine Del Drive, Flagstaff, AZ. 86001 

Telephone: (520) 774-5669 

Description of Performance: 

Multicultural and bilingual stories and songs for audiences of all ages. Can tell stories about Captain 
John Hance, who was an early Grand Canyon guide and noted Tall Tale Spinner. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

For Summer Reading Programs: $150 all expenses included for Northern Arizona. Outside Northern 
Arizona $250. 

Travel Range: 

Statewide. 

Past Performances: 

Mesa Public Library, Albuquerque Public Libraries, 150 schools and libraries in Arizona, Colorado, 
Utah, Nevada, and New Mexico, and various conferences and festivals. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Gene Williams 

Address: 19333 E. Ocotillo Road, Queen Creek, AZ 85242 

Telephone: (480) 987-3665 

Description of Performance: 

Creative writing and how to get it published. Teaches students by analyzing a story to improve their 
writing skills and write as well as the professionals. Holds seminars and teaches workshops. Also has a 
business that does videos, art, designs, topography, and printing, and can instruct in these areas. 
Programs for children. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable, depending on the occasion. 

Travel Range: 

Phoenix Metro area preferred. 



Past Performances: 

Held after school programs at libraries for students on improving their writing skills. Conducted 
seminar at Mesa Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: John Williams 

Address: PO Box 2207, Chino Valley, AZ 86323-2207 

Telephone: (520) 636-065 1 

Description of Performance: 

Educational Entertainment Experiences for children. He plays guitar and does sing-along getting the 
children involved in the music. Also presents adult musical programs of Hokey Folky Grunge (folk 
music with humor). Beginning songwriting and performing techniques. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable. 



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Travel Range: 

Anywhere in Arizona. 



Past Performance: 

Cottonwood Public Library, Prescott Public Library, Pioneers Home in Prescott, Charly's in Flagstaff, 
Fiddler's Dream in Phoenix, Thirsty Ear in Chino Valley, Phoenix Public Library, The Essenza in 
Mesa, The Ark Room in Phoenix, Peoria Public Library. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Janet Winans 

Address: 1 108 Mohave Avenue, Parker, AZ 85344 

Telephone: (520) 669-6578 

Description of Performance: 

Reads poetry, her own and others selected to fit the specified theme. Will discuss the process of 
writing her experience and the creative process. Exercises in creative writing can be part of the 
program, if desired. 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Workshop $50, Lecture $75, Performance $75. 



Travel Range: 
Arizona. 



Past Performance: 

Public schools in Tucson, Phoenix and White River, Arizona; Cottonwood Public library. Has traveled 
with the Tumbleword Group of Roving Writers in Coolidge & Lake Havasu City. 



Contact Person: 

Name: Diane Winslow, Dreams Unlimited Story Telling Service 

Address: 137 Mountain Morning Drive, Tucson, AZ 85704 

Telephone: (520) 742-0662 

Description of Performance: 

Author/Storyteller. Fantasy and Real Life Stories, Southwest Stories. Age level: Preschool, 
Intermediate, Juvenile and Adult. Available weekends only with exception of evenings in Tucson area. 
(Only available weekends and holidays). 



Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable plus mileage. 



Travel Range: 
Arizona. 



Past Performance: 

Schools in Wickenburg, Coolidge, Casa Grande, Tucson and Phoenix and various resorts including 
Canyon Ranch Spa Resort and Doubletree. Also toured schools in Indiana and Illinois. 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Rosie Stevens Witcher 

2742 S. Azalea Drive, Tempe, AZ 85282 
(480) 831-3880 



Description of Performance: 

Storyteller of Cajun and Southern Stories (Crayfish Tales and other Southern Delights). All age levels 



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Fee Plus Mileage: 

Negotiable. 

Travel Range: 

Arizona. 

Past Performance: 

National celebrations in Sacramento and Scottsdale. Artist in Residence in theatre 
(AZ Commission of the Arts). 



Contact Person: 
Name: 
Address: 
Telephone: 



Yavapai County Sheriff’s Office, do Sharon Wachter 

Yavapai County Sheriffs Office 

255 E. Gurley Street, Prescott, AZ 86301 

(520) 771-3275 



Description of Performance: 

Child safety programs, good touch, bad touch, stranger danger. Can arrange for education on most any 
topic, can schedule deputies, K-9 units etc, to visit groups. 

Fee Plus Mileage: 

None 



Travel Range: 

Yavapai County only 

Past Performance: 

Yavapai County Schools, library groups, pre-schools, etc. 



Contact Person: 

Name: 

Address: 

Telephone: 

Description of Performance: 
Fee Plus Mileage: 

Travel Range: 

Past Performance: 



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RESOURCE PEOPLE INDEX] 



RESOURCE - PEOPLE 
INDEX 



NAME 


CATEGORY 


PHONE 


PAGE 


Abbott, John 


Storyteller 


520-636-2025 


271 


Accent Entertainment 


Variety Acts 


480-967-7676 


271 


Aces Entertainment 


Storytellers 


956-5102 


271 


Artio, Penny 
Aloha Hoomalimali, 


Nature 


480-982-6376 


272 


Alice Stewart 


Dancers 


480-986-7293 


272 


Anderson, Dorothy Daniels 


S tor yteller/ Author 


957-0462 


272 


Arboretum of Flagstaff 


Arts & Crafts, Nature 


520-774-1442 


273 


Arizona Historical Society Museum 


History 


480-929-0292 


273 


Arizona Science Center 


Science 


716-2000 


273-274 


Arizona Public Service Company 


Safety 


250-3418 


274 


Asano, Doris 


Arts and Crafts (Origami) 


997-0679 


274 


Austin, Lon 


Folksinger 


623-979-8374 


274-275 


Benally Berta 


Storyteller/Dancer 


520-527-1041 


275 


Black, Karen 


Storyteller 


520-888-3926 


275 


Bourque, Joan 


Author 


520-634-6606 


275-276 


Burke, Laurie 


Musical 


520-282-6617 


276 


Butler, Lollie 


Author/Storyteller 


520-622-2046 


276 


Cardamone, Frank 


Juggler 


520-717-1760 


276-277 


Coconino County Health Dept. 


Safety 


520-522-7871 


277 


Coconino County Sheriffs Dept. 


Health & Safety, Nature 


520-774-4523 


277 


Conway, K. E. 


Nature, Arts & Crafts 


520-284-1074 


277-278 


Corl, Susan 


Arts & Crafts 


520-394-2926 


278 


Chautaqua, Jay Cravath 


Musician 


480-893-1482 


278 


DJ the Clown 


Clown 


580-0834 


279 


Detter, Jill 


Storyteller 


274-8076 


279 


Doyle, Don 


Storyteller 


480-833-3013 


279-280 


Education Dept of Planned Parenthood 


Health & Safety 


263-4244 


280 


Estes, Paul W. 


Magician 


257-4261 


280 


Fallon, Marge 


Storyteller 


520-203-0795 


281 


Faro, Pam 


Storyteller 


508-9331 


281 


Flutterbys Puppets 


Puppeteers 


246-4043 


281 


Folksteppers, Alice Stewart 


Dancers 


986-7293 


282 


Freeman, Dennis R. 


Storyteller 


623-465-7791 


282 


Galvan, Roman 


Storyteller/ Actor/Singer 


520-636-8528 


282-283 


Garaway, Margaret K. 


Author 


520-579-9321 


283 


Geisler,Harlynne 
Great Arizona Puppet 


Storyteller 


619-569-9399 


283 


Theater, Nancy Smith 


Puppeteers 


262-2050 


284 



377 



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RESOURCE PEOPLE INDEX] 



NAME 


CATEGORY 


PHONE 


PAGE 


Halim, Fatimah 


Author/Storyteller 


230-0797 


284 


Handke, Sue for Danny 


Cartoonist 


480-991-3131 


284-285 


Harris, Sue and Kyle 


Music/Storytelling 


943-8645 


285 


Heard Museum 


Museum 


252-8840 


285 


Hennessy, B. G. 


Author 


948-5288 


285-286 


Herron, Bill 


Science 


520-733-7000 


286 


Hollan, Mary 


Singer 


906-0377 


286 


Howard, Rich Entertainment 


Variety Acts 


480-945-9193 


287 


Irbinskas, Heather 


Author 


520-298-2145 


287 


Iverson, Diane 


Author 


520-541-9304 


287 


Jolly Roger 


Magic and Tricks 


480-991-4292 


288 


Lance, Kathryn 


Author, Creative Writing 


520-326-2555 


288 


Lee, Anne 


Storyteller 


520-751-1402 


288 


Lewis, Deanne RN, CMS 


Storyteller 


520-778-6473 


289 


Long, Sylvia 


Illustrator/Author 


480-483-6181 


289 


Lukas, Cynthia 


Author, Creative Writing 


480-585-6180 


289-290 


Luv Clowns, Alice Stewart 


Clowns 


480-986-7293 


290 


Lynton, Lynn 


Musical 


440-1074 


290 


Marcellino, Thomas M. 


Nature 


480-984-6017 


290-291 


Norman, Judy 


Storyteller 


979-4875 


291 


Merril, Carol 


Storyteller 


520-636-0982 


291 


Merlene, Pris 


Personal Improvement 


480-649-2150 


291-292 


Meyer, Vi 


Storyteller 


480-948-6508 


292 


Meyers, Gloria 


Storyteller 


520-884-7951 


292 


Mike, Jan 


Author, Creative Writing 


520-790-0732 


292-293 


Mikell, Ken 


Musician, Storyteller 


520-634-6464 


293 


Miller, Dale E. 


Magician 


520-453-1309 


293 


Mohave County Cooperative, 


Hobbies, Nature 


520-753-3788 


293-294 


Music Performance Trust 


Fund 


Musicians 


254-8838 


294 


Museum of Northern Arizona 


Nature, Puppet Shows 


520-774-5211 


294 


Nolander, John 


Variety Acts 


520-459-8339 


294-295 


Norman, Nita 


Storyteller 


271-9216 


295 


Norris, Tony 


Musician, Storyteller 


520-526-6684 


295 


O'Dair, Grace 


Storyteller 


520-774-4187 


295-296 


Ogunsile, Remi 


Storyteller 


907-2744 


296 


Oso, Pat 


Storyteller 


480-890-0792 


296 


Ovaitt, Lorrain 


Storyteller 


520-636-0675 


297 


Parker, Steve 


Cartoonist 


509-927-7339 


297 


Pattison, Sheila 


Storyteller 


520-749-4375 


297 


Phelps, Kimberly 


Magicians 


480-833-4014 


298 


Phoenix Irish Step Dancers, Sharon Judd 


Dance 


253-1978 


298 


Phoenix Zoo, Education Dept. 


Nature 


273-1341 


298 


Pizzino, Leticia 


Storyteller 


800-669-7533 


298-299 


Prchal, Steve 


Nature 


520-883-3945 


299 


Presto Magic Studio, 


Barry Schor 


Magicians 


480-464-4518 


299 



37S 



314 



I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 



RESOURCE PEOPLE INDEX | 



NAME 


CATEGORY 


PHONE 


PAGE 


Pro-Impact Stunt Team, 
Lance Lyons 


Stunt Team 


480-858-0211 


300 


Puppet Pizzazz, Joy Wade or 
Joyzelle Curtis 


Puppets 


480-833-5577 


300 


Quintessence Chamber Ensemble 


Musicians 


483-9430 


300-301 


Riggs, David A. 


Storyteller 


480-996-6715 


301 


Rivera, Martin Juan 


Storyteller 


520-544-4533 


301 


"Rosa, Loca"-Tish Dvorkin 


Musicians 


986-6016 


301-302 


Ross, Leslie Eve 


Storyteller 


242-6067 


302 


Sadow, Jeffrey 


Storyteller 


480-990-8605 


302 


Sandin, Joan 


Author/Illustrator 


520-881-4481 


303 


Schick, Dick 


Health & Safety, Magician 


480-838-1608 


303 


Seats, Susan 


Magician 


996-4363 


303-304 


Shropshire, Mary Ruth 


Author/Storyteller 


520-529-1161 


304 


Smith, Elaine 


Sign Language 


480-962-4908 


304 


Smokey the Bear, Woodsy 


Health & Safety, Nature 


520-527-3492 


304-305 


the Owl 

Society for Creative Anacronism 


History 


480-962-6355 


305 


Southwest Brass, Russ Plylar 


Musicians 


997-9981 


305 


Starlight Planetarium Productions 
Brian DeWelles 


Science 


623-486-0102 


306 


Steele, Michael 


Magician 


520-634-7985 


306 


Stevens, Jan Romero 


Auther/Storyteller 


520-774-2611 


306-307 


Story, Joyce A. 


Storyteller 


623-935-1685 


307 


String Sounds, Susan Smith 


Musicians 


275-7790 


307 


Tang, Stan 


Cartoonist, Illustrator 


553-8166 


307-308 


Vela, Laurie 


Storyteller, Author, 


1-800 






Illustrator 


222-4974 


308 


Vogelsong, Phyllis 


Puppeteer 


623-934-4206 


308 


Wade, Allan 


Magician 


480-962-4426 


309 


Weaver, Dorothy Hines 


Author 


623-938-7672 


309 


Weissenberg, Fran 


Author 


520-881-5827 


309 


We're Storytellers, Russell Mann, 
Anna Del Paxton 


Storytellers 


520-774-5669 


310 


Williams, Gene 


Creative Writing 


480-987-3665 


310 


Williams, John 


Musician 


520-636-0651 


310-311 


Winans, Janet 


Creative Writing 


520-669-6578 


311 


Winslow, Diane 


Author/Storyteller 


520-742-0662 


311 


Witcher, Rosie Stevens 


Storyteller 


480-831-3880 


311-312 


Yavapai County Sheriffs Office 
c /o Sharon Wachter 


Safety 


520-771-3275 


312 



3 

ERIC 



379 



315 



RESOURCE COMPANIES! 



I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 

A Child's Art Factory, 7371 Player Drive, San Diego, CA 92119. 1-619-460-6077. 

Prepackaged craft kits for groups of 24, 30, 36 or 100 students, ranging in price from $15 
to $120 depending upon the size of the kit. 

ABC School Supply, Inc. 3312 N. Berkeley Lake Road, Duluth, GA 30136. 1-800-669-4222. 

Hand puppets, craft supplies, prizes, flannel boards, games, records, etc. 

ALA Graphics. American Library Association, 50 E. Huron Street, Chicago, DL 60611. 

1-800-545-2433. 

General posters, calendars, decorations for libraries. 

Accent Annex. 1 120 S. Jeff Davis Parkway, New Orleans, LA 70125-9901. 1-800-322-2368. 

Novelties and trinkets including masks and hats. 

Action Products International, Inc. 344 Cypress Road. Ocala, FL 34472-3108. 1-800-772-2846. 

Fax: 1-352-687-4961. 

Educational toys, model kits, science toys, animal figures. 

Argus Posters for Education. P.O. Box 6000, Allen, TX 75002-1304. Orders: 1-800-527-4748. 

Colorful posters and award certificates which can be purchased in volume batches 
for prizes. 

Arizona Renaissance Festival. 12601 East Highway 60, Apache Junction, AZ 85219. 1-520-463-2600. 

Fax: 520-463-2026. 

Medieval festival runs for 6 weeks yearly starting in February. Flyers, study guides, posters. 

Building Blocks. 38W567 Brindlewood, Elgin, IL 60123. 1-708-742-1013. 

A catalog of idea books: bulletin boards, felt boards, exploring art, fingerplays, puppets, clay 
modeling projects, singing games, etc. 

Carson-Dellosa. P.O. Box 35665. Greensboro, NC 27425-5665. 1-800-321-0943. Fax: 1-800-535-2669. 
Instructional materials, bulletin boards, charts, clip art, books, rubber stamps, blocks. 

Child Graphics Press. P. O. Box 7771, Hilton Head Island, SC 29938. 1-800-543-4880. 

Primarily posters and ’’novel unit teacher's guides” which contain bulletin board ideas and activities. 

Children’s Book Council. Order Center, 350 Scotland Road, Orange, NJ 07050. 1-800-999-2160. 

Colorful posters and certificates for summer reading programs. 

Dakin, Inc. P. O. Box 7200-Order Department, San Francisco, CA 94120-9977. 1-800-227-6598. Linda 
Pazola, local sales representative will show samples and take orders, 602-493-1773. Minimum order 
$250.00. 

DEMCO, Inc. P. O. Box 7767, Fresno, CA 93747-7767. 1-800-356-1200. FAX 1-800-245-1329. 

Kids Love Libraries : new ways to inspire today's kids, 1995 catalog. Books, puppets, bookbags, 
bookmarks, posters, display racks and library furniture, designed for kids. 

Devonshire Renaissance Faire. City Of Phoenix, Parks, Recreation & Library Dept. 2802 E Devonshire. 
Phoenix, AZ 85016. 602-256-3130. Fax: 602-262-6001. 

Coordinates activities and performances for annual Devonshire Renaissance Faire at Los Olivos Park, 
Phoenix, Arizona on 9/27-9/28/97. Contact for information. 

Gryphon House, Inc.: Early Childhood Teacher Books. P.O. Box 207. Beltsville, MD 20704-0207. 
1-301-595-9500, Toll Free 1-800-638-0928. FAX: 301-595-0051. 

Publishes activity books, including fingerplays, crafts, art, science, math, celebrations and holidays. 

380 




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RESOURCE COMPANIES! 



Highsmith. West 5527 Highway 106, P. O. Box 800, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538-0800. 

1-800-438-1637. 

Library promotions, including puppets, posters and bookmarks. 

Hot Rod Magazine. P.O. Box 51397, Boulder, CO 80323-1397, Attn: Frederick R. Waingrow, President 
A possible source of sports related incentives to offer as prizes. 

Inside Stuff. The Quarter Group Inc., 2155 Butterfield, Suite 200, Troy, MI 48084-3423, Attn: Media 
Programs - Karen Ashnault 

A possible source of sports related incentives to offer as prizes. 

JanWay Company. H Academy Road, Cogan Station, PA 17728-9300.1-800-877-5242. 

Personalized promotional items for libraries: magnets, buttons, bags, bumper stickers, mugs, pens and 
pencils, shirts and caps. 

J.L. Hammett Co. P.O. Box 660420, Dallas, TX 75266-0402. 1-800-333-4600. Fax: 1-800-873-5700. 

Teacher resources, classroom supplies, art & craft materials, furniture & equipment. 

Johnson Specialties. P. O. Box 357, Cedar Hurst, NY 11516-0357. 1-800-221-6714. 

Catalog of trinkets and inexpensive items. Treasure chests in a variety of sizes ( on page 24). 

Jr. Drag Racer. P.O. Box 5555, Glendora, CA 91740-0950, Attn: Promotions Manager-Diane Harlander 
A possible source of sports related incentives to offer as prizes. 

Kids & Things (DEMCO), P. O. Box 7767, Fresno, CA 93747-7767. 1-800-356-1200. 

Fax: 800-245-1329. 

Kidstamps. P. O. Box 18699, Cleveland Heights, OH 44118. 1-800-727-5437. 

Inexpensive rubber stamps of all sorts. 

Kimbo Educational, Department R, P.O. Box 477, Long Branch, NJ 07740-0477. 1-800-631-2187. 

Cassettes, records, filmstrips, videos and read-alongs useful for storytime activities. 

Kipp Brothers, Inc. P.O. Box 157, Indianapolis, Indiana 46206. 1-800-428-1153. Fax: 1-800-832-5477. 

Toys, novelties, gifts, carnival & party items. 

Lakeshore Learning Materials. P.O. Box 6261, Carson, CA 90749. 1-800-421-5354. Fax: 1-31 0-537- 
5403. Arts & crafts supplies, games, puzzles, music instruments, blocks, toys. 

Library Clip Art Book. Em Graphics, Box $233, Greenville, NC 27835-8233. 1-919-355-2478. 

140 reproducible drawings designed by a library community relations coordinator specifically for 
library themes and services. $50 per volume plus $3 shipping. 

Listening Library: Literature Based Media For Children And Adults. 1 Park Avenue, Old Greenwich, CT 
06870-1727. 1-800-243-4504. 

Carries wonderful characters, puppets and dolls to go with favorite children's books: Curious George, 
Pippi Lonstocking, Madeline, Winnie the Pooh, Clifford, etc. 

Music for Little People. P. O. Box 1460, Redway, CA 95560. 1-800-727-2233. 

Audio and video cassettes, musical instruments, some costumes and activity kits. 

Oriental Trading Company, Inc. P. O. Box 3407, Omaha, NE 68103. 1-800-327-9678 for catalog requests. 
1-800-228-2269 for orders. 

Catalog includes a range of inexpensive trinkets and promotional items. Inexpensive prizes can be 
ordered in bulk; some decorations and crafts materials. 




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RESOURCE COMPANIES] 



Racing for Kids. Griggs Publishing Company Inc. P.O. Box 500, Concord, NC 28026-0500, Attn: Robert E. 
Griggs Jr. 

A possible source of sports related incentives to offer as prizes. 

Really Good Stuff. A division of Filmic Archives, The Cinema Center. Botsford, CT 06404. Customer service: 
203-261-1920, or orders: 1-800-366-1920. 

Posters, bookmarks, stickers, buttons, trophies and other learning materials for librarians and teachers. 

Rivershore Reading Store. 2005 32nd Street, Rock Island, EL 61201. 1-309-788-7717. 

1995-96 Catalog has lots of Olympics related incentives: award ribbons, stickers, collectible buttons, 
friendship bracelets. 

S & S Educational Products; S & S Arts and Crafts. P. O. Box 513, Colchester, CT 06415-0513. 
1-800-243-9232 or (203) 537-3451. 

Craft kits and supplies geared toward youth groups and crafts groups. 

Shapes ETC. 8840 Rt. 36. P.O. Box 400, Dansville NY 14437. 1-800-888-6580. 

Die-cut shapes e.g. bears, hearts, etc. Also stencils, rubber stamps and bookmarks - most of the paper 
"shapes" come 3" x 3" or 5"x7". 

Sherman Specialty Company, Inc. P. O. Box 401, Merrick NY 11566. 1-800-645-6513 or 
1-800-669-7437. FAX: 1-800-853-TOYS (8697) 

Various trinkets, small toys, prizes, stickers, and treasure chests. 

Smilemakers, Inc. P. O. Box 2543, Spartanburg, SC 29304-2543. 1-800-825-8085. 

Stickers and toys. 

Sports Illustrated for Kids. Time Inc. - Time Life Buildings Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020- 
1393, Attn.: Promotion Manager -Pamela T. Dey 

A possible source of sports related incentives to offer as prizes. 

T. S. Dension and Co., Inc. 9601 Newton Ave. S., Minneapolis, MN 55431. 1-800-328-3831. 

Discovery themes information cards which contain reading and art activities on various topics. 

Tuff Stuff. P.O. Box 751901, Charlotte, NC 28275-1901 

A possible source of sports related incentives to offer as prizes. 

U. S. Toy Co., Inc. 1227 East 119th Street, Grandview, MO 64030. 1-800-761-5900. 

FAX: (816) 761-9295 

Inexpensive novelties and toys to use as incentives. 

Upstart. 32 East Avenue, Hagerstown, MD 21740. 1-800-448-4887. 

Reading and library promotional items. Posters, decorations, bookmarks, bags, prizes for libraries. 
Catalog ? (p.12-13) has materials with the theme: WIN WITH READING. 

Wonderstorms. do World Almanac Education, P. O. Box 94556, Cleveland OH 44101-4556. 1-800-321- 
1147. 

Posters, bookmarks, mobiles, displays, to promote reading. Catalog covers many themes. 



382 



o 



318 



IREAD: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA~ 



RESOURCE MATERIALS] 



RESOURCE MATERIALS 



Government Publications: 

Government publications are available at low cost and in bulk quantities. Some of the titles below may coordinate 
with or supplement programs you choose to do this summer. Libraries may wish to order a quantity of the 
publications for distribution to interested parents, or for distribution to the general public. 

The following publications may be ordered from: 

R. Woods, Consumer Information Center, Pueblo, CO 81009 

BOOKS FOR CHILDREN #8 

A listing of 100+ of the best children’s books recently published, from preschool to high school levels. 1992. 

$1. Item 101Z. 23pp. 

HELPING YOUR CHILD LEARN GEOGRAPHY. 

For children 3 to 10: fun ways to learn geography. 1990. $.50,. Item 414Y. 33pp. 

HELPING YOUR CHILD LEARN MATH. 

Free, 2 copies maximum. Item 612Z. 

HELPING YOUR CHILD LEARN SCIENCE. 

Some science basics plus fun activities for parents and children to do jointly. 1992 $3.25. Item 143Z. 64pp. 

HELPING YOUR CHILD LEARN TO READ. 

Free, 2 copies maximum. Item 617Z. 

HELPING YOUR CHILD USE THE LIBRARY. 

1992. $.50,. Item 415Z. 23pp. 

TIMELESS CLASSICS. 

Lists nearly 400 books published before 1960 for children of all ages. 1991. $.50,. Item 417Y. 

YOU CAN HELP YOUR YOUNG CHILD LEARN MATHEMATICS. 

Fun ideas to connect real life experiences with mathematics. 1991. $.50,. Item 412Y. 

From the Government Printing Office, the following titles are available. Call the GPO Order Desk for prices 
(202)-783-3238. Give the stock number. 

COMO AYUDAR A SUS HIJOS A APRENDER CIENCIA. 

1992. Stock number 065-000-00521-2. 64pp. 

From Library Programs/Office of Educational Research and Improvement, U. S. Department of Education, 555 
New Jersey Ave., NW, Room 402, Washington, DC 20208 (202)-208-0969 

COMO AYUDAR A SUS HIJOS A USAR LA BIBLIOTECA. 

1992. 25pp. 



383 



319 



| READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA LIBRARIANS' FAVORITES: A RESOURCE LIST | 



LIBRARIAN'S FAVORITE: 

BEST BOOKS FOR CHILDREN'S PROGRAMMING 



Can you find it?: 25 library scavenger hunts to sharpen your research skills.. 

McCutcheon, Randall. Revised edition. Minneapolis, MN. Free Spirit Publishers, cl991. 

Channels to Children: Early Childhood Activity Guide for Holidays and Seasons. 

Beckman, Carol A. Colorado Springs, CO. Channels to Children’s, 1982. 

A handbook containing crafts, finger plays, songs and stories for felt, and patterns to use and arranged in 
thematic categories according to seasons or holidays. 

Copycat Magazine. Racine, WI, Copycat Press. 

When planning programs for young people. Copycat Magazine is undoubtedly the source used most frequently 
by all members of the Youth Service Department at our library. While Copycat is advertised as a classroorp 
tool of "ideas and activities for K-3 teachers", our staff has found this magazine indispensable in our day-to-day 
functions at the library. We use its colorful and informative calendar each month as the focal point of our 
bulletin board. Copycat's seasonal and thematic units provide us with stories, bibliographies, crafts, songs and 
reproducible artwork for use in our storytimes and other programs. Each issue covers two month’s worth of 
activities and includes information about special days. The artwork is simple and somewhat whimsical yet it 
remains appealing to both children and adults. If your library can't afford a full-time artist-in residence, then 
become a guilt-free "copycat" by subscribing to this wonderful magazine. Write to: Copycat Press, P. O. Box 
081546, Racine, WI, 53408-1546. At $16.95 a year for five issues, it's a bargain! (P.S. No issue is published 
during July/ August but you’ll be too busy with your summer reading program to even notice!) 

Connecting Young Adults and Libraries : a how-to-do-it manual. (How to do it manuals for libraries series). 
Patrick Jones. New York. Neal-Schuman, 1992. 

Young adults’ libraries -Administration. 

Creative Resources for the Early Childhood Classroom. 

Herr, Judy. Albany, N.Y. Delmar Publishers, 1990. 

Thematic units containing fingerplays, songs, books, recipes, art activities, developmental skill activities, 
games, creative drama, and music. 

Everyday Circle Times. 

Wilmes, Liz and Dick. Elgin Illinois. Building Blocks, 1983. 

Thematic units with ideas for displays, songs, fingerplays, recipes, field trips, books and games. 

Also: The Circle Time Book? 1982 

Yearful of Circle Times, 1989 
More Everyday Circle Times. 1992 

Flannelboard Fun A Collection of Stories, Songs and Poems. 

Brigg, Diane. Metuchen, NJ. Scarecrow Press, 1992. 

Discusses how to make a felt board and felt figures and offers other suggested activities. Includes 28 stories 
and rhymes with patterns for felt figures and a bibliography of resources for storytime programming. 

Library Puzzles and Word Games for Grades 7-12. 

Smallwood, Carol. Jefferson, NC. McFarland & Company, cl 990. 

Library orientation for junior high school students. Junior high school libraries — Activity programs. 

Picture Book Story Hours: From Birthdays to Bears. 

Sitarz, Paula Gaj. Littleton, CO. Libraries unlimited 1987. 




384 



I READ: FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA LIBRARIANS' FAVORITES: A RESOURCE LIST~| 



Includes an introduction on putting a Storytime together with thematic chapters following. Each chapter 
discusses publicity, presentation, read aloud books, fingerplays, songs, story presentation ideas (felt board, tell 
and draw, etc.) and films. Includes an appendix for other resources aids in programming. 

Also: More Picture Book Story Hours. From Parties to Pets. 

A Planning Guide to the Preschool Curriculum . 

Sanford, Anne R. Winston-Salem, NC. Kaplan Press, 1983. 

Each section of the book is divided into a weekly theme with sub-themes with levels of skill development. 

Units contain crafts, activities, recipes, finger plays, songs, and storytelling ideas. 

Ring A Ring O ’Roses: Fingerplays for Pre-School Children. 

Flint Public library, 1026 E. Kearsley, Flint, MI. 48502. (313) 232-711 1 
A collection of alphabetically arranged fingerplays with subject index. 

The Storytime Sourcebook . 

Cullum, Carolyn N. New York. Neal-Schuman Publishers, 1990. 

Divided into thematic sections giving suggestions for filmstrips/films, books, craft, activities, songs and 
fingerplays. 

Story S-T-R-E-T-C-H-E-R-S: Activities to expand Children's Favorite Books. 

Raines, Shirley C. Mount Rainier, ND. Gryphon House, 1989. 

Chapters are arranged around a theme with each theme containing several feature books. Each feature book has 
ideas for crafts, creative drama, science and recipe activities, books, fingerplays and songs. 

Also: Story S-T-R-E-T-C-H-E-R-S. 1991. 

Theme- A-Saur us: The Great Big Book of Mini Teaching Themes . 
compiled by Jean Warren. Everett, WA. Warren Publishing House, Inc., 1989 

Each thematic unit contains a variety activities designed for preschool children. Each unit has art and science 
activities, recipes, fingerplays, and songs and at the end there is a bibliography of books to each theme. 



Theme- A-Saur us II: The Great Big Book of Mini Teaching Themes . 

Compiled by Jean Warren, Everett, WA. Warren Publishing House, 1990. 

A companion volume to Theme- A-Saurus with additional themes containing art and science activities, recipes, 
games, fingerplays and songs. 



Young Adult Program Idea Booklet. 

Wisconsin Library Association. Children’s and Young Adult Services Section. YA Task Force. 
Madison, WI. Wisconsin Library Association, 1991. 

Young adults-Books and reading. Young adults’ libraries 



385 



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ERIC 



386 387 



The following coupons are to be used as incentives for the participants in 
your summer reading program. For information on the adult ticket prices 
when a child’s ticket is complimentary, please contact the appropriate 
organization: 

The Phoenix Zoo 

http://www.phoenixzoo.org/info/location/ 

602-273-1341 

The Arizona Science Center 
http://www.azscience.org/ 

602-716-2000 

Arizona State Parks (main office in Phoenix) 

For specific parks, please contact them directly 
http://www.pr.state.az.us/text/parkfees.html 
Tel & TTY (602) 542-4174 
From Area Code 520 call toll free 1-800-285-3703 

Arizona Renaissance Faire 

http://renaissance-faire.com/Renfaires/Arizona-Renassance-Festival.htm 

(520)463-2600 



Please remember to thank these organizations for their support of YOUR 
summer reading program! 



388 



Participated in the 2000 Arizona Reading Program | Participated in the 2000 Arizona Reading Program 



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Arizona State Parks 

Escape to the outdoors and enjoy nature, boating , hiking , and 

fishing... 

Explore Arizona from breathtaking desert scenery to awe 
inspiring pine forests. . . 




State P»rko 



Experience living history programs and go back in time 
when the west was truly wild... 



Northern Region 

Dead Horse Ranch State Park (Cottonwood) 
Fool Hollow Lake Recreation Area (Show Low) 
Fort Verde State Historic Park (Camp Verde) 
Homolovi Ruins State Park (Winslow) 

Jerome State Historic Park (Jerome) 

Lyman Lake State Park (St. Johns) 

Red Rock State Park (Sedona) 

Riordan Mansion State Historic Park (Flagstaff) 
Slide Rock State Park (Sedona) 

Tonto Natural Bridge State Park (Payson) 

Western Region 

Alamo Lake State Park (Wenden) 

Buckskin Mountain State Park (Parker) 

Cattail Cove State Park (Lake Havasu City) 



Lake Havasu State Park (Lake Havasu City 
Yuma Crossing State Historic Park (Yuma) 

Yuma Territorial Prison State Historic Park (Yuma) 

Southern Region 

Boyce Thompson Arboretum State Park (Superior) 
Catalina State Park (Tucson) 

Lost Dutchman State Park (Apache Junction) 
McFarland State Historic Park (Florence) 

Patagonia Lake State Park (Patagonia) 

Picacho Peak State Park (Picacho) 

Roper Lake State Park (Safford) 

Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park 
(Tombstone) 

Tubac Presidio State Historic Park (Tubac) 



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This coupon valid for 50% off park day-use 
entrance fee at any Arizona State Park. 
Good for one time only, up to four people. 



(Library Name) 

Must be 1 8 or under to be eligible. Present this coupon to receive 50% 
off park day-use entrance fee to any Arizona State Parks. Not valid at 
Kartchner Caverns State Park™ or Oracle State Park. Not valid without 

library stamp. 

VALID THROUGH DECEMBER 3 1 , 2000. t 

For free brochure, call (602) 542-41 74 , _ Arizona State Parks ,js|i 

or (800) 285-3703 from the 520 area code-j r J ! J 1 300 W. Washington J5r 

http://www.pr.state.az.us Phoenix, Arizona 85007 isrJL 




•••••" — - * 




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the Arizona 



& ARTISAN MARKETPLAl 

J KIDS! (AGES 5-12) 

. Enjoy Your Day at 
'"Festival 2001 for 
Participating with 
Arizona Reads! 

Huzzah! 



KIDS 

5-12 

FREE 

Receive One Free Child's Ticket 
with One Full Price Adult Ticket 

$6.00 VALUE • Under 5 Atman FREE 




This coupon is valid at 2001 Festival Main Gate ticket booth only. 

1 ticket per coupon. NOT VALID in conjunction with a Fry’s discount ticket ^ 
or any other discount offer. No purchase required for a coupon. 

Available while supply lasts. Limit one coupon per person. cs 




HE ARIZONA 



~TOARTISAN MARKETPLA' 

KIDS! (AGES 5- 

Enjoy Your Day at 
Festival 2001 for 
Participating with 
Arizona Reads! 

Huzzah! 




KIDS 

5-12 

FREE 

Receive One Free Child's Ticket 
with One Full Price Adult Ticket 

$6.00 VALUE • Under 5 Always FREE 



This coupon is valid at 2001 Festival Main Gate ticket booth only. 

1 ticket per coupon. NOT VALID in conjunction with a Fry's discount ticket ^ . 
or any other discount offer. No purchase required for a coupon. ^r 

Available while supply lasts. Limit one coupon per person. ^ 




THE ARIZONA 

•NAISSAN 

^ARTISAN MARKETPLA' 

KIDS! (AGES 5-12) 

Enjoy Your Day at 
Festival 2001 for 
Participating with 
Arizona Reads! 

Huzzah! 



KIDS 

5-12 

FREE 

Receive One Free Child's Ticket 
with One Full Price Adult Ticket 

$6.00 VALUE • Under 5 Always FREE 



This coupon Is valid at 2001 Festival Main Gate ticket booth only. 

1 ticket per coupon. NOT VALID in conjunction with a Fry’s discount ticket ^ 
or any other discount offer. No purchase required for a coupon. ^r 

Available while supply lasts. Limit one coupon per person. q 




■ '' •*$■¥' . '<:£■ ^ v*t**v$. 

,■ ~ ~ ARIZONA 





KIDS! (AGES 5-llf * 

Enjoy Your Day at y. 
Festival 2001 for j 
Participating with 
Arizona Reads! 

Huzzah! 




KIDS 

5-12 

FREE 

Receive One Free Child's Ticket 
with One Full Price Adult Ticket 

$6.00 VALUE • Under 5 Always FREE 



This coupon is valid at 2001 Festival Main Gate ticket booth only. 

1 ticket per coupon. NOT VALID in conjunction with a Fry's discount ticket ^ i 
or any other discount offer. No purchase required for a coupon. 

Available while supply lasts. Limit one coupon per person. c* j 



ERIC 



"96 




BEST COPY AVAILABLE 



ARIZONA READS PROGRAM EVALUATION 



Please help us evaluate the 2000 Arizona Reads Summer Reading Program. 

Please photocopy and complete the form. Return it to Arizona Reads Evaluation, Arizona Humanities Council, 
1242 N. Central, Phoenix, AZ 85004-1867, no later than September 15, 2000 . 

Thank you for your cooperation! 

1. Library Name: * 

Address: 




2 . 

3. 



Children’s Services Contact Person: - 

Job Title: 

Are you interested in serving on the 2001-2002 Arizona Reads Committee? 
What was the primary goal of your Summer Reading Program this year? — 



Phone No.: 



YesG No Q 



How did you measure achievement of this goal? 
(please check any that apply) 



Statistics 



Quantitative Measures (Mandatory) 



Yes No 

o □ 



Qualitative Measures (Pick at least one) 



1. Focus Groups 

2. Peer Evaluation 

Unobtrusive Observation 
Questionnaire 



3. 




Fast Response Survey 
Questionnaire 
Focus Group 



Q Q or 

or 

□ □ or 4. Attitudinal Measurement 



□ 


□ 


Interview 


□ 


□ 






Focus Group 


□ 


□ 




Questionnaire 


□ 


□ 


□ 


□ 


□ 


Observation 


□ 



□ □ 



ERJT 



307 



i 



Using your qualitative measures: 

What difference does the Arizona Reads Program make your Library? 



What difference does the Arizona Reads Program make to your community? 



MANDATORY STATISTICS 



OPTIONAL COMMENTS 
PROGRAM STATISTICS 



4. Number of all youths registered 

(break down by age if possible or just give total) 

Children (ages 0-14) 

Young Adults ages (15+) 

Total: 



5. Total number of weeks in your 
Children's Program (ages 0-14) 



In your Young Adult Program 
(if separate) (ages 15+) 



3 

ERIC 



393 



4. Population of Legal Service Area (an etf'p§itKl 
§§J Population faffea-:ilWiil 

lliP^hon of Legal Service Area (ages 15+) 



Total: 




2 



MANDATORY STATISTICS 



6. Number of FTE involved in your Program _ 
Number of Adult Volunteers Involved 
Number of Youth Volunteers Involved 

7. Total number of volunteer hours contributed 
to the program 

8. Total number of meetings, special events 

programs etc- held during your Arizona 
Reads Program 

Programs (definition): are any activity 
which informs, educates, motivates or 
entertains children, while promoting 
library use. 

Total number of children and adults attending 
each event (estimate is okay) 

vii 

viii 

ix 

x 

xi 

xii 



(Continue your list on the back of this page, 
if necessary). 

9. Were any special needs children involved in 
your program? 

Yes □ No □ 

If yes, please explain: 




OPTIONAL COMMENTS 

6. Was staffing adequate to support your program? 
More than adequate Q 

Ad equ ate CJ V 

Inadequate Q 



8. Please describe one of your most successful 
programs ; ; 



Please list local sponsors of your program: 





best copy available 



o 

ERiC 



399 



3 



MANDATORY STATISTICS 



OPTIONAL COMMENTS 



PROGRAM BUDGET 



10. Overall program budget for all library programs 
in 2000 

$ 

1 1 . Your local budget for Arizona Reads $ 

Program 

Contribution by Friends of Library $ 

Amount contributed by other sources $ 

Total Arizona Reads program budget $ 



11. How would you rate the a< 


dequacy of 


of your ARP budget? (Please check one) 


More than adequate 


□ 


Adequate 


□ 


| Inadequate 


□ 



********************* 



Please enclose, with your evaluation, any pictures, newspaper articles, booklists, programs, or other items that 
you wish to share with us these items are displayed at the annual Arizona Reads Program Workshop in 
September or October. 

Thank you for your participation in this survey. 

An optional questionnaire regarding the Arizona Reads manual and promotional items follows. 



4'xD 



BEST COPY AVAILABLE 



EVALUATION OF ARIZONA READS PROGRAM MANUAL 
AND PROMOTIONAL ITEMS 



1 . 



How would you rate the Arizona Reads Program manual? 

Useful □ Somewhat useful □ 



Not useful □ 



What suggestions do you have for improving the manual? 



What difference does the manual for the Arizona Reads Program make to your library?. 



2. How would you rate the other materials provided by the Arizona Humanities Council? 



Free Items 


Useful 


Somewhat 


Not Useful 






Useful 




Activity Sheets 


□ 


□ 


□ 


Paper Book Bags 


□ 


□ 


□ 


Bookmarks 


□ 


□ 


□ 


Clip Art 


□ 


□ 


□ 


Reading Log 


□ 


□ 


□ 


Posters 


□ 


□ 


□ 




Cost Items 


Useful 


Somewhat 


Not Useful 






Useful 




Zipper Pulls 


□ 


□ 


□ 


Pencils 


□ 


□ 


□ 


Buttons 


□ 


□ 


□ 


Stickers 


□ 


□ 


□ 


Magnetic frame 


□ 


□ 


□ 


Canvas Bags 


□ 


□ 


□ 


T-Shirts & Polo Shirts 


□ 


□ 


□ 




4^1 



1 



What suggestions do you have for improving these materials provided by the Arizona Humanities Council?. 



What difference does the availability of these materials make to your library?. 



3. What themes would you like to propose for future Arizona Reads programs?. 






Please enclose, with your evaluation, any pictures, newspaper articles, booklists, programs, or other items that 
you wish to share with us these items are displayed at the annual Arizona Reads Program Workshop in 
September/October. 

Thank you for your participation and evaluation of the 2000 Arizona Reads Program. In addition, your interest in the 
improvement of libraries in Arizona is greatly appreciated. 



4 ° 2 



o 

ERLC 




Arizona Reading Program 



A project of Arizona Reads, a collaboration between the Arizona Humanities Council and the Arizona Department of Library, Archives and Public Records. 




4^5 





Arizona Reading Program 
Come Join Us! 



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